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Answers from
Cindy Rhodes
Q&A Feeding a Raw Diet

Disclaimer: I am not a vet or a health care professional. Feeding a raw species appropriate diet can be a controversial topic, and like any feeding regimen can have health risks associated with incorrect feeding and preparation. DO NOT FEED COOKED BONES, ever! Cooking bones changes the molecular structure, they become brittle and may splinter and injure or kill your dog!! NO COOKED BONES.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Degenerative Myelopathy

Degenerative myelopathy is a disease of the spine in which the dog slowly loses the abilty to walk. Over the years I have had several dogs with this disease.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Save a Puppy's Life

In January of 1990 I had two large litters of pups (21 total puppies) at my kennel facility in Wisconsin. On January 14th they started to die. Before the nightmare was over I lost 6 puppies and spent $2,400.00 in veterinary bills. This article is about the changes I made in my breeding program to insure that something like this never happens to me again. I really think other breeders can benefit from what I have learned from this terrible experience.

Written by
Ed Frawley
The Importance of Good Positioning on Canine Hip X-rays

The purpose of this article is to teach the average dog owner how to determine if a hip x-ray is done properly on their dog’s hips. The article will demonstrate correct positioning and poor positioning. It will show 2 different sets of x-rays done on the same dog on the same day. One set has good positioning, the second set has poor positioning. You will see that with poor positioning, a dogs hips can look worse than they actually are. You will also see that no matter what you do with positioning you can never make a bad hip into a good hip.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Panosteitis

Panosteitis is the long form for what breeders call "Pano." Pano is a growth disease which is more common in large, big boned dogs. It can show up as young as 5 to 9 months and usually does not occur after a dog is 18 to 20 months. It is more of a growth disorder than a disease, but it is very painful to young dogs.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Vaccinosis: Do Your Research Before You Vaccinate

The unfortunate thing about vaccinosis is that people don't get involved in learning about it until after there is a problem, and by then it's often too late.

Vaccinosis is the term used for "reactions our pets have to being vaccinated." It is far more common than we are lead to believe. In fact, most veterinarians refuse to talk about it because they are the ones who give the shots that cause Vaccinosis.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Many Vets Don't Deserve Your Respect or Your Business

Cindy and I have a veterinarian (Dr. Rice - The Stillwater Vet Clinic in Stillwater, MN) who in our opinion can walk on water. There is no doubt in our mind that we could not find a better veterinarian anywhere in the country. Dr. Rice truly loves and cares about animals. I could write an article praising this man. His ethics, his professionalism, the way he cares about the welfare of animals is simply amazing. One only has to be around him for a few minutes to trust and like him. All I can say is he that he inspires me.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Should I Neuter My Dog

I get many emails asking if they should neuter their dogs. Neutering animals is an important income stream for many vets, which is why so many vets will advize you to neuter. The fact is unless your male dog is a monorchid (only has one testical) you should not neuter your dog (male or female).

Written by
Ed Frawley
What are Allergies?

An allergy is the body’s intense reaction to a substance called an allergen that can be inhaled through the lungs, ingested through the mouth, or absorbed by the skin. Often, when these substances are eliminated, symptoms do seem to decrease. Pets exhibit their distress by scratching and biting their bodies, by their digestive upsets, by their bad body odor, by their poor coats and by their difficulty in breathing and/or anxieties.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Cleaning Your Dog's Ears

1. Mix 50/50 vinegar and water. 2. Fill a 20 to 50 CC syringe (without the needle on it). 3. Inject it into the ear - (not so fast that you would cause damage! Don't force it as so not to block the air that comes out or hard enough to damage the dogs ear drum!). 4. Massage it for 60 seconds. 5. Clean the ear with cotton balls (not "Q" tips). 6. If the dog requires medications - put them in after this application. With dogs that seem to have constant ear problems - clean their ears at least once a week.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Foods That are Toxic to Dogs

One thing that all pet owners should be aware of is that there are some foods that we eat everyday that can be toxic or fatal to your beloved pet. The following is a list of some foods that can be dangerous to our pets.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Foods That are Toxic to Dogs

Many of us have houseplants as well as trees and shrubs in our yards. Some of these seemingly harmless plants can make our pets sick or even kill them if they eat the wrong parts. Below is a list of some possibly toxic plants and trees.

Written by
Otomax
Ear Problems in Dogs

1. Cotton swabs and slides are needed to perform a roll smear. 2. The cotton swab is gently placed in the ear canal to recover a sample of the exudates. If otodectic mange is suspected, mineral oil should be placed on the cotton swab. 3. The cotton swab is then rolled on the slide. A consistently thin smear should be made for bacteria and yeast. A thick smear should be made for Otodectes.

Written by
Fred Lanting
Cataracts in the German Shepherd

Cataracts - This is a disorder of that part of the eye that looks like the double-convex glass disk in the telescope, binocular, microscope, magnifying glass, etc. The lens is clear and transparent in the normal dog, is filled with a viscous fluid, and is situated between the outer "skin-like" cornea and the main part of the eyeball containing the vitreous humor, another fluid.

Written by
Daniels Pharmaceuticals
Your Dog and the Thyroid Gland

The thyroid gland is a small gland located under the skin at the center of the neck. It is regulated by a smaller gland at the base of the brain, called the pituitary gland. This gland signals the thyroid to produce thyroid hormone and regulates its blood concentration.

Written by
Daniels Pharmaceuticals
Your Dog and the Thyroid Gland

The pancreas, is one of the most important glands in the endocrine and digestive system. It is located next to the stomach and large intestine. The pancreas serves two major functions in the body. One is to produce insulin and alter hormones that regulate carbohydrate metabolism.

Answered by
Ed & Cindy
Dogs with Torsion & Bloat

Bloating is fatal 98% of the time. If you have had experiences with your dog bloating we would appreciate hearing about it and we will add them to this article. Your experiences may help other dog owners learn how serious bloating in dogs is.

Written by
Dave Trowbridge
Setaria: The Cereal Dog Killer

There’s a dog killer lurking in your neighborhood: a common weed, called foxtail. The many variants of the foxtail are not native to North America (with one exception), and many pet owners would gladly prescribe a Dantean punishment for the European immigrants—the Spanish in California where I live—who introduced the damned things to the New World. Native or not, chances are you see it every day during spring, summer, and fall and never think twice about it. But it’s out there, and if you don’t take appropriate precautions, it can kill your dog—or, at the very least, kill your veterinary budget. Here’s a story of one dog that came off second best in an encounter with the foxtail—but he lived. Others have not been so lucky.

Written by
Ed Frawley
Poison Proofing Your Dog

Not many people need to worry about poison proofing a dog. But if you happen to be someone who is being stalked, or if you engage in a profession where people may try and hurt you or your family, then its not a bad idea to consider doing this. Even if its just to insure that no one will kill your pet.

Submitted by
Leerburg Readers
Holistic Vets

This list was created to assist dog owners who wish to raise their dogs on a raw diet with minimal vaccines and chemicals. This is NOT the list for people who want a regular allopathic vet that pushes kibble and yearly vaccinations.

We have asked our discussion forum members for their input and experiences with holistic vets, practitioners or conventional vets that support raw feeding and a minimal or no vaccine protocol. We have no experience with the vets on this list unless otherwise noted and are not recommending one over another.

Written by
Stu Tarlowe
What To Do If Your Dog Is Skunked

My dog Buick got skunked recently in my sister's backyard on the East Coast, while HER dog just laughed and laughed!

It was Buick's second skunking, and I hope this time he's learned his lesson. My skunk remedy, both times, was a thorough bathing with the same product I’ve used for years, on all my dogs, for routine bathing: “Dr. Bronner's 18-in-OnePure Castile Soap.” Either the peppermint or eucalyptus variety will do the job.

From the
Tufts Breeders Conf.
Notes from the Tufts Genetics Breeders Conference

Genetic analyses of domesticated animal species have proved very useful for determining relationships between breeds (Wiener et al., 2004), for illuminating the processes underlying the domestication process (Wiener & Wilkinson, 2011), and for identifying genes associated with specific traits (Georges, 2007).

From the American
College of Vet. Surgeons
Chronology of Hip Dysplasia Development in Labrador Retrievers

Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) was ?rst described by Schnelle in the mid-1930s and is currently recognized as the most common orthopedic disease of large and giant-breed dogs. Hip dysplasia is a complex disease re?ecting a combination of genetic weaknesses and environmental stresses that can promote progressive remodeling and osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip joint.

Interpreted by
Honey Gross-Richardson
Hip Dysplasia and the SV

The first success - taking stock!

All encompassing agreement and great understanding: The breeders and members commented entirely positively on the introduction of the Breed Value Assessment for HD in the SV!

Countless phone calls and requests in the Head Office document the great interest, that the members of the SV, have in this scheme. The decision of the federal general meeting of the SV to introduce the Breed Value Assessment for HD is generally welcomed. The SV thereby fulfills it's great responsibility towards the welfare of the German Shepherd breed!

From the
Orthopedic Foundation
for Animals
Hip Dysplasia and the SV

Elbow dysplasia was originally described as a developmental disease manifested as degenerative joint disease of the elbow with or without an ununited anconeal process. Erroneously, the term elbow dysplasia became synonymous with ununited anconeal process thus causing the confusion that exists among some veterinarians and breeders.

Developmental degenerative joint disease of the elbow has multiple inherited etiologies, which may occur singularly or in combination (ununited anconeal process, fragmented medial coronoid process, or osteochondritis of the medial humeral condyle).

From the
Washington State
University
Giving Subcutaneous Fluids to a Dog

Fluid given under the skin, subcutaneously (SQ), is absorbed into the blood stream and can be used to correct or prevent dehydration. The most frequent disease for which fluids are given is chronic kidney failure. Dogs with chronic kidney failure pass large amounts of urine and may not feel well enough to drink enough to prevent dehydration. The dog owner may give subcutaneous fluids a few times a week to supplement the water the dog is drinking in order to prevent dehydration and help flush waste products through the kidneys.

From the
Science Daily
Lou Gehrig's Disease In Humans Genetically Linked To Dog Disease

An incurable, paralyzing disease in humans is now genetically linked to a similar disease in dogs. Researchers from the University of Missouri and the Broad Institute have found that the genetic mutation responsible for degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs is the same mutation that causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the human disease also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. As a result of the discovery researchers can now use dogs with DM as animal models to help identify therapeutic interventions for curing the human disease, ALS.

Written by
Karen Thompson
Death of a Dream

Once upon a time, in a land not-so-far away, there lived a beautiful soul. He was anexuberant, handsome, sweet, and strong six-year-old Golden Retriever, named “Kirby.” Kirby was a very special dog with unlimited potential. His registered name, Coppertop Sky’s the Limit, said it all. The sky really was the limit for the talent he possessed. That is, until the day Kirby encountered a particularly nasty tick.

Written by
Karen Thompson
New Tools in the War Against Tick Borne Disease

The tick population across the country is currently exploding and expanding. There have been reports of dogs dying of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever as far east as Connecticut. The Lone Star Tick that is normally responsible for transmitting that particular disease was previously isolated to parts of the Rocky Mountain States, but can now be found nearly anywhere.

Written by
Fred Lanting
Canine Ear Hematomas

Hematomas are fluid-filled pockets on the inside of the earflap (pinna) caused by some trauma (forceful injury), which in the first place might be the result of an allergy, an infection, dogfight injury, being struck, or a foreign body such as dirt, yeast, a seed, mites. The fluid is a mixture of blood from tiny blood vessels (capillaries/arterioles/small veins), plus correlating pathways of the lymph system.

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