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Written by
Ed Frawley
Emails about Dog Bites & Dog Attacks (Warning: Graphic photos of dog bites below)


How to Break up a Dog Fight Without Getting Hurt

Ed Frawley discusses two different ways to break up a dog fight whether you're alone or with someone.



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Carrie Silva Wooddell, a professional dog trainer with over ten years of experience, teaches families how to better understand their dog and demonstrates how to prepare and introduce their dog to their new baby.

In recent years, the number of child dog bites has risen. Keep your baby safe by learning the warning signs to watch for when your dog is around your baby.

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CLICK HERE to visit the product page for this DVD and for purchasing options



If you own an aggressive dog you need my DVD titled Dealing with Dominant & Aggressive Dogs.


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Email:

March 3, 2016

I dont know what triggered the dog fight. My two male shepherds had finished eating and were lying down. One of them got up and went and started drinking water. The other followed and thats when the growling started. by the time I got to them, it was a full blown fight. I separated them by just getting in and ripping them apart. i put them both down and held them. After a brief period, I released them. The one shot back at the other and thats when i instinctively stuck my hand in and thats when the bite happened


Email:

June 2, 2014

I'm from the UK and have found your website through searching for dog fights, so I thought I would tell you my story. I have a 4 year old male Staffordshire bull terrier who is very well sociailised. He loves people and he loves other dogs male or female. He has been attacked more times than I can remember and he just cowers behind me. He's never ever shown any aggression to other dogs other than the odd warning growl if they do try to go for him and that's usually only if he's on a lead and if he feels really threatened. He plays at dog parks with male and female dogs off lead he's wonderful.

So this perticualar day, my best friend was at a funeral and needed someone to look after his also male Staffordshire bull terrier. He's a lovely natured dog as well and gets along with my boy so I agreed to have him for the day. I took them out for walks and they were great. I had them in my house for over 4 hours when I let them outside. My friend's dog was been a bit daft about picking stuff up in the garden and running round with it. I misjudged the situation and all of a sudden, my boy attacked and he meant it. I couldn't get them apart the other dog didnt seem to be fighting back but my lad had hold of the side of his face just under the eye. I thought he was going to kill him. There was alot of noise. It was awful. I dunno maybe thats a bit of an exagerration? But what I thought I saw was a dog in proper killing mode. I couldn't stop him. My mild mannered dog had suddenly turned into a killing machine. I stupidly tried to prize his jaws apart. I'm a women of not very big build and I didnt have the strength to do it and his jaw shut and clamped on my finger. It dislocated it at the pip joint. It fractured the bone and severed the tendons. I didnt realise it had happened at first until I saw it. My finger never got stuck in his mouth with both the dogs still fighting. My neighbour came out to see what all the noise was. He jumped over the wall, twisted his collar, and eventually my boy let go. But then he grabbed the other dog's paw. Again my neighbour twisted the collar and somehow got him to let go. Never once did either dog go for me or my neighbour.

It was 4 weeks ago now and I would like other people to be able to read my story. I have attached a pic of my finger although it's not the best but it gives you an idea. I cannot move it and have been told it could be two years before I get right. There is a possibility I may never get right. I blame myself as I never should have brought another dog into my dog's territory.

Many Thanks for reading my story,
Amanda


Email:

January 30, 2014

If you are still looking for dog bite pictures, I have one to share that I sustained while trying to break up my two dogs. An Australian Shepherd/Lab mix and an Australian Cattledog. Both were rescues both 2 1/2 years old, and lived together fine for 6 months until they recently started fighting. Joey was the resident dog, we'd had him since 6 months old, and the Jackson the Cattledog we rescued at 18 months. He was anxious, had a slew of health issues that we cleared up, and when he felt comfortable enough he started attacking Joey out of jealousy. The slightest things set him off. Me and my boyfriend had broken up 3 or 4 fights already, using the back legs effort quite effectively, but while we were trying to train them to get along we were keeping them crated separately unless we were both home.

I accidentally did not lock the Shepherd/Labs cage when I let the Cattledog out to go outside when I was home alone on Jan 7th. Joey, the Shepherd must have been feeling relaxed, because he started to exit his cage as well. Then Jackson the Cattledog noticed and before I could divert attention, I was in the middle of a fight, They are both 50-60 lbs, and I fear so greatly that they will seriously harm each other, they are fighting to the death. I was thinking what to do when I noticed a break in the fight, tried to tell the Cattledog to go to bed, and grabbed Joey by the scruff, but Joey unexpectedly turned and bit my hand. I screamed once and he let go but damage was done. I was wearing fabric gloves, not sure if it helped or not, it certainly must have looked like fur to Joey.

I ran out of my house in my sock feet (it was -20 that day) to the neighbours, dogs still fighting, and when I arrived at the hospital my glove was soaked with blood and I was so nervous to have them cut it off! I had a badly broken ring finger, just snapped right in half, which required surgery to place a pin, and 10 stitches in my middle finger. It was a terrible experience, and the whole time in the hospital I was just crying for fear of my dogs condition. They are both the sweetest boys, but they refused to live together peacefully. We really wanted it to work out, but dealing with my injury and the uncertainty of their future, we realized it was best to separate them and we found Jackson a fantastic new home, where he doesn't feel threatened by a housemate. I miss him dearly, and feel like a failure, but we were over our heads, the Cattledog was so overbearing and it was hard to deal with two dogs who needed constant supervision to even be in the same room together.

We have definitely learned a lot through this experience, about dogs and about ourselves. Thanks for your advice.

Kaylee

Ed's Response:

Kaylee,

First I would like to thank you for taking the time to send this information. It will help others understand how dangerous this can be. Most people simply don’t know. In fact more instructors in dog training schools don’t know.

I would like to offer a little advice for the future. We have had dog’s that we would never allow to be together, not even on leash together (because they were adult German Shepherds and Malinois)

We were able to live with them through good management. Meaning we used dog crates in the house. They were never out together. Not ever. Some folks like their dog crates to be in the living area. We don’t do that simply because we have a nice finished room in the basement that is set up with 4 dog crates and it our feeding room. We have a fridge and freezer there for the food and all dogs eat in their dog crates.

I also recently produced a short video on Management for one of our recent newsletters. It’s free to watch if you can watch streaming video on your computer. I suggest you watch it. Good management is just as important as good obedience training when it comes to living with a dog.

Good luck with your dogs. And again thank you

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Email:

Dear Ed,

I am a dog lover since the time I was wearing diapers and that's a pretty long time ago, I saw some of your videos and I must say you did some impressive work.

I am a fan of positive reinforcement method ONLY. I believe humans did enough damage to dogs and the animal kingdom in general because of their egomania of thinking we have to rule the world... and they will use physical power even violence to achieve so... I am against any PHYSICAL handling of a dog of any temperament and with any issues.

As much as I do respect your work, I need to write you about how much the dominant and aggressive dog video is foreign to me.

I don't care if it will take a month to get my dog to understand instead of understanding within few seconds... You say it is ok to jerk on a prong with a dominant dog as a harsh correction, anyone can do that... This is not establishing my position as a pack leader but the animal fearing the pain from the jerk of a prong... There can be another solution to that type of behavior-maybe food, sound... Since you know so much, why wouldn't you try to figure out something new and less harsh? You have the capacity and competency, why use harm or pain to achieve obedience? I do know a hard, dominant, aggressive dog can be a real danger and a challenge trust me, I have an abused  rescue pit bull with thyroid issue and all sorts of aggression writing this email with me to you. But I NEVER ever used any physical force with him and he is better and better every year I have him... Do I want to correct some of his remaining "bad" behavior? I do but until I figure out how without any physical handling I won't.

Best,
Lotti (SOFT dominant dog with any aggression you name) and Martina the handler

Ed's Response:

You are naive.

What would you do with dogs that did this?
http://leerburg.com//dogbites.htm

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Email:

June 28, 2012

My 6 year old son was bit by the babysitter's dog yesterday, i don't know what led to the bite and I don't know how or if it was provoked. Here are the photos. his nose injury is actually a laceration about 1/2 inch deep. He also had a puncture wound on his neck and in between his fingers. His cheek they were unable to repair, so a chunk of his cheek is missing and will have to heal from the inside out.


Email:

Dear Ed,

I am a dog lover since the time I was wearing diapers and that's a pretty long time ago, I saw some of your videos and I must say you did some impressive work.

I am a fan of positive reinforcement method ONLY. I believe humans did enough damage to dogs and the animal kingdom in general because of their egomania of thinking we have to rule the world... and they will use physical power even violence to achieve so... I am against any PHYSICAL handling of a dog of any temperament and with any issues.

As much as I do respect your work, I need to write you about how much the dominant and aggressive dog video is foreign to me.

I don't care if it will take a month to get my dog to understand instead of understanding within few seconds... You say it is ok to jerk on a prong with a dominant dog as a harsh correction, anyone can do that... This is not establishing my position as a pack leader but the animal fearing the pain from the jerk of a prong... There can be another solution to that type of behavior-maybe food, sound... Since you know so much, why wouldn't you try to figure out something new and less harsh? You have the capacity and competency, why use harm or pain to achieve obedience? I do know a hard, dominant, aggressive dog can be a real danger and a challenge trust me, I have an abused  rescue pit bull with thyroid issue and all sorts of aggression writing this email with me to you. But I NEVER ever used any physical force with him and he is better and better every year I have him... Do I want to correct some of his remaining "bad" behavior? I do but until I figure out how without any physical handling I won't.

Best,
Lotti (SOFT dominant dog with any aggression you name) and Martina the handler

Ed's Response:

You are naive.

What would you do with dogs that did this?
http://leerburg.com//dogbites.htm

Regards,
Ed Frawley


About a Bite:

I work for an animal control agency. I am putting together a manuel for new employees and came across your web site about dog bites. I have enclosed a photo of one of the worst ones I have seen while here. Of course I can't give all of the details, but this is the upper left arm of a boy about 12 years old. He was attacked by a dog that the family had recently taken in - a shepherd-pit mix. The mother of the boy told us the story - family was camping when the dog went after something in the dark. The boy tried to pull the dog back to the campfire when it turned on him. The boy has very little use of the arm left.

Hopefully this picture can help to show people what can happen when a dog is in "fight drive."

dog bite

dog bite


Comment:

Hi Ed,

I have been trolling around your web site today and am amazed at the stupidity of most dog owners!   My daughter (7) was attacked by our neighbors German Sheppard a month ago (she did ask permission and the owner was standing right there) and had to have reconstructive surgery on her face.   Anyone who thinks that dogs shouldn’t be trained in a manner that is “not warm, fuzzy and cute” are off their rockers!  Thank you for attempting to keep our world safe with training and information on your web site.   No child should have to experience what Natalie and countless others have due to the stupidity of clueless owners. 

Thanks!
Katie
Atlanta, GA

dog bite

Ed's Comment:

There are SO MANY STUPID OWENERS out there.

Do you have any other photos? I am writing a book on dog aggression and laying the problem at the feet of these stupid people – and can always use good photos. They may help others in the future. Your daughter is a beautiful little girl. I hope she is doing better

Kind Regards,
Ed Frawley

Response:

Ed,

Here are a couple more.  One is of her on the operating table still under anesthesia, the other is the next night after surgery.  Thanks for your research and hard work. 

Katie

dog bite dog bite


5 Month Old Rot Pup Bites Wife

Mr Frawley,

My name is Matthew I am a 7 year veteran of the New York State Police and 10 year veteran in Law Enforcement. I recently passed up an opportunity to be a K-9 Officer in order to have a household pet that can be home with my wife and soon to be newborn baby due March, 2006 when I am working the overnight shift.

I lost my last Rottweiler to cancer at 9 years 8 months of age in August of 2002. He was a great dog. I recently bought a 9 week old Rottweiler Bono from AJMA Rottweilers, Andrzej Rozek www.ajmarottweiler.com just outside Newark, NJ. I paid $1500.00 for the puppy. I purchased your video 8 weeks to 8 months and am very satisfied with it. I am considering purchasing your dog obedience video soon, since the Bono is coming up on 5 mos of age.

Here's my situation; (I understand it is a handler problem and not the dog). Bono is food aggressive. I make him sit before he can have his food. I put it down and put my hand either in the bowl or I continue to hold the bowl until he is done eating. He does not make a peep. However if I pet him or my wife pets him while I am holding the food he growls. I contacted my breeder and he suggested to buy a beef bone from the butcher and hold it while Bono chews on it. I did this and I'll tell you what the outcome was. I was sitting on the floor Bono was in a seated position and chewing on the bone while I held it. I could pet him and he would not make a sound. However, my wife leaned over from the couch and pet him and all hell broke loose. He bit her on her hand by the wrist breaking the skin. I immediately reacted and grabbed him by the sides of his face lifted him off the ground and shouted NO and continued to shout out him for about 5 seconds (he is about 45 lbs.).

I am willing to do anything to correct this problem and my wife and I are concerned and want to be able to trust the dog when the baby comes. I have about 4 months before the baby. Can this be corrected.

Thank you,
Matthew

Answer on Rot Dog Bite

There is a lot that has to be said here.

I recommend that you go to my web site and read the article I wrote on my philosophy of dog training. I think you will get some good ideas there.

We don’t do what you are doing with the dogs we raise. That is screw with the dogs food. I believe its unfair for a pack leader to give food and then screw with it. Pack leaders eat first. Pack leaders allow lower ranking pack members to eat but they don’t harass them after they have allowed them to eat. Don’t worry a lot of people mistakenly do what you do. When dogs have a tendency to be dominant they also have similar problem.

We feed our dog in the dog crate.

The fact is there are much better ways to deal with dominance. You may want to read the article I wrote on GROUND WORK to Becoming a Pack Leader.

The Basic Dog Obedience program is part of the solution but not all of it. Sounds pack behavior training is also important.

Read the article I just wrote titled THE THEORY OF CORRECTIONS IN DOG TRAINING.

I can tell you that this dog needs some serious logical training right now with a prong collar. Your wife needs to step to the line and work with this dog. Its going to take some work

I can also tell you that you need to plan on doing training with a remote trainer with this dog. Maybe not right away but this dog will need e-collar training. I use a Dogtra 1700 on my personal dog. I just finished producing a DVD titled E-Collar Training for the Pet Owner.

Lastly study the article I wrote titled Dealing with a Dominant Dog. You can find these if you go to the list of training articles and scroll down. You need to know this information. If you have a 5 month old dog biting your wife you have zero wiggle room to screw up.

Regards,

Ed


dog bite


Question:

Hello Ed,

I have spent the last 5 hours reading your web page and all the great articles. I wish 8 years ago, I would have been able to do this. I am emailing you now because my situation seems to be somewhat different, or perhaps I just have not found an article covering my problem.

I have an 8 1/2 year old Chocolate Lab named Zero. When we got him we also had a 7 year old Lab, Zero was the runt of the litter and always had a problem nursing because the other pups would not let him. We assumed that this is why he would growl when we went near his food, so we just left it alone. The 2 dogs got along great, and there never was much of a problem with aggression. 4 years ago, we had to put the older dog down due to Illness. The vet came to our home, the younger one was put in another room and it was done. Since then, Zero has become somewhat of an aggressive animal and I am at my wits end. He does go on the furniture (I know, bad) and used to sleep in bed with us (I know, also bad. but that stopped over a year ago when we got a new pup). He growls when told to get down, he growls whenever you tell him something he does not want to do. Zero most of the time stays in his yard, but if he gets a whiff of something, he will wander off. If you try to grab his collar to bring him back he growls. He and the new pup have several fights and the pup has the scars to prove it. The little one has pretty much learned to read Zero now and they are great friends most of the time.

Now I know the growling is a problem, but there is a bigger one, he has nipped a few people (all family members). The first person he bit was me- It was the middle of the night a couple years ago, he was sleeping on the bed with us and hogging the bed so I pushed him with my feet, and he bit my toe.

The second time was Last January, we were visiting my husbands parents where Zero has gone many times before. They also have 2 dogs, one is a nasty female who has bitten Zero. He Ran and Played all day and into the night(I should mention he has a lot of energy). My husband and I decided to go out for a bit, and we left Zero at the house as we have many times before. While we were gone, he bit my Mother-in-law in the finger. She said he was really tired and sleeping at her feet and she bent over to pet him, and he bit her.

Third time, again at my in laws, same scenario playing all day and sleeping at my husbands feet. My Husband gently put his foot on the dog and Zero bit him in the toe.

Fourth time, 2 months ago at our home. We had just begun a remodeling project and had workers in-and out- He played for about 9 hours outside, then my husband and I went out for a bit. When we came home, we decided to put the puppy upstairs with us because know the history of my tired, grouchy dog. After doing my pre- bed routine I started to go upstairs where a baby gate was at the bottom of the stairs. There was Zero, not getting out of my way. I pushed him away once, twice and the 3rd time resulted in 7 stitches in my finger. (He did have a nasty ear infection, and I did push his head so maybe this was provoked).

Then last night- We are staying at my Moms during our re-model and getting ready for dinner. (The dogs were only out a couple hours and did not play super hard.) The dogs always come to the table and we make them lay down. My husband told zero to lay down a couple times and he used his hand to signal. The dog growled and went to my husband and bit him in the hand. I did not see it, but my husband says he did not touch him. No stitches or anything, a puncture wound.

So... My husband wants to put the dog down. Although he has never ran after anyone or "attacked" anyone, he is afraid it is just a matter of time as these incidents are getting closer together. I would like to pursue some form of re-training but don't know if it is possible to re-train a dog his age. I love this dog like a child and the thought of killing him has caused lack of sleep and appetite. He really is a good dog 99% of the time (but there is a lot of growling at my house), and I'm not just saying this, but one of the smartest dogs I have ever seen. Lately however, the problem seems to be getting worse. I know the obvious things like let a sleeping dog lie, and stay away from him when he's been playing all day and tired, but my husband says under NO circumstances should a dog bite his owner and unless the problem is corrected, he wants the dog put down. I do plan on taking him to the vet first so we can rule out medical issues, but after that, I am at a loss. Can you give me any advice at all, or maybe you know a good trainer in Wisconsin I could consult with?
Thank you for taking the time to read my long story and I hope to hear from you.

Regards,
Monica

Ed's Comments:

This is more of a lack of education problem than a dog problem – its also very common.

You need to educate your dog, educate yourself and then change the way you live with this dog.

Here is a directory of information if you care to learn.

If you like this dog and want to fix it you can its up to you. But you cannot continue to live with it in the way you have.

Regards,

Ed


Our Dominant Dog nips at people

Ed

I have a question about dog aggression. I have a 5 year old female Giant Schnauzer that I got 2 years ago from a breeder that was done showing her. I would describe her as very confident but not an overly dominant dog. She's very smart and responds well to training. I also have a 7 year old male Giant that I’ve had since he was a puppy.

The first year I had her I never saw any aggressive behavior other than barking when someone is at the door. About a year ago I was at a friends house and her 8 year old son came into the yard after playing at a neighbors and she started barking at him very aggressively, I pulled her away and everything seemed fine after that. I was caught off guard so I know I was a little slow to react to the situation since she had never acted this way before. Then I had a situation at my home. My father-in-law came over and just walked into the house and she started barking aggressively and nipped at him. I pulled her away made her sit and she was fine. This is also the first time anyone had come over and just walked into the house without being let in. She has always been ok when I let people in, she usually just runs to get a toy. So after that incident I always hold her and have her sit when people come in the house and she has been fine.

I also have a cottage on a lake and last summer a friend came over, she never barked at him she just started following him and nipped at his shirt. It was really weird behavior. It didn’t really seem aggressive, she was just paying a lot of attention to him and she usually has no interest in strangers. She has not acted this way with anyone else and we have a lot of visitors at our cottage.

Now last weekend this same friend and his wife came over to my house. I did the usual holding her until they came in so she knows it’s OK for them to be there and she seemed fine. The next thing I know my friend walks by her and she bit him in the leg. Luckily she didn’t rip his pants but she did give him a little puncture wound. I just don’t understand what would cause this behavior. She never growled or barked at him before she bit. I really didn’t even realize what happened at first I just grabbed her and put her in another room. She obviously does not like this person for some unknown reason.

I would appreciate any training advice you have and what might cause this behavior,

Liz

Ed's Answer on the dog bite

You are making serious mistakes here.

Pulling the dog away is wrong. The dog needs a VERY HARD correction when it does this. Pulling the dog away is not a correction. You have perpetuated this behavior because of your mistake.

I strongly recommend the DVD I did on Dealing with Dominant and Aggressive Dogs.

I also recommend that you visit my web site and read a training article I recently wrote titled THE THEORY OF CORRECTIONS IN DOG TRAINING.

The reason I wrote this article was to help people understand how to motivate their dogs in training. Most people either use the wrong kind of correction or over correct dogs in training. I am not a fan of “force training” (although I most defiantly believe that every dog needs to go through a correction phase). By exploring corrections in training you will become a better dog trainer.

Regards,
Ed


I tried to break up a fight between my 2 beagles and ended up in the hospital emergency room

I found this site 3 weeks too late. I would have sent the picture of my finger, arm, leg and torso. I have a male beagle that I keep outside and a male inside that is his offspring (mixed breed). They hate each other. The outside dog dug under the 5 foot chain link fence while the inside dog was out front of the house on his cable. I went to unhook the inside dog and bring it in and the outside dog that escaped the back yard seen me with the dog it hates and came running and attacked it. I was trying to hold them apart by their collars and my fingernails were bending backwards I was holding them so tightly. It all happened so fast. I first let go of one for just a second to get the front door open and both tried to enter the house fighting like they were trying to kill each other. I knew I could not let them both into the house fighting. So I grabbed them apart by their collars again and led them to the back gate of the fence. I knew I had to let one go to grab the latch to the fence. When I did they really started fighting. I was at the emergency room 30 minutes later getting 6 stitches in my thumb and had several puncture wounds. It happened so fast, I don't even know which one bit me or maybe they both did. I am going to look into purchasing your DVDs. Also someone told me that I could have separated them with the water hose.

Angie

Ed's Answer on getting bit by a dog:

Thanks for writing. I will add this email to the site so people can learn from it.

The two DVDs I recommend are:

Basic Dog Obedience
And
Dealing with Dominant and Aggressive Dogs

I would also recommend a dominant dog collar for both dogs.

Ed


 

Dear Ed,

I studied your marvelous home page and tried to find the answer to my problem. We are living in Hungary at countryside in a family house with three dogs. We have two female dogs escaped from the street and one 5 year old male German Shepard Ali, who is my son's dog and we got him as a puppy. Ali is a beautiful big friendly dog and he is very strong. He got an obedience course and we can go for a walk with him without leash, because he is coming back if we are calling, and there is very few people. He is a little bit jealous of our other dogs but he never attacked them.He is very hard at the fence, but never attacked anybody. He is afraid of the doctor very much. Once a year doctor comes and vaccinate them. Last week came the doctor and we (my husband and me) tried him to hold but he got a panic and broken out and bit me on my face twice. I got a very ugly wound on my nose and another on my soul. I am absolutely uncertain what to do, how to handle this situation. What did I do wrong. We did not hit the dog after it, and he is calm again. My son scold him and I do not play with him anymore. What is the proper behavior in the situation? Your article about the dog's aggression is very interesting, but I do not understand what type of aggression was this.

Thank you in advance,
Maria
Hungary

Ed's Answer to this dog bite:

This dog needs the following:

Pack structure training
Serious obedience training - with a electric collar
A muzzle when you handle the dog

Regards,
Ed


My Dog bit me in the face that required 27 stitches:

Ed

I don't know if you take time to respond to emails anymore. I have been swimming around your web site., it is clear to me that you really know dogs.

Here's my question if you have time:

What steps can I take to AVOID bringing home a dominant puppy/dog?

- Which breeds are less likely to challenge pack order - if any?

- Does birth order affect adult dominance? Should we avoid the runt?

- Did I read on your site that if neutered gender does not affect dominance?

- Do the puppy "temperament tests" I've read about really indicate adult temperament/ dominance? ( I read on your site that dominance does not become clear until the dog reaches adulthood... - aren't there any indicators in a puppy at all? )

Here's why I am reaching out to you:

I have had dogs through my childhood and much of my adult life. 4 years ago we purchased a show bred German Short hair Pointer from a reputable breeder for a family pet. I thought I did everything right in training, establishing/maintaining pack order, exercise and play. I was committed to raising her right and did a good deal of research on these issues. After visiting your web site. I can see that in spite of my efforts I did not train through the correction phase so I did not know how to respond correctly when, as an adult dog, she became less clear on pack order. We trained her in puppy hood with Narnia (a recommended program in the Naperville, IL area) - are different training programs better or worse for particular breeds?

I adored this dog, she was really smart, playful, interactive; as a stay at home mom she spent all her days with me - we never had any growl, snap or obvious dominant issues between us. I did not treat her as a child but respected her as a dog. I unknowingly made a bad mistake: from the floor I approached her face with my face straight on - my vet said this was a challenge to her - and without a warning she bit me on the mouth requiring 27 stitches. Right or wrong, with 27 stitches, advice from the vet and her breeder we put her down. We have three young children and 9 neighbor children who run through my house and yard all the time - I was terrified of the risk to them.

Sadly this incident has affected my confidence as a dog owner and my trust in all dogs as family pets. I want my children to grow up loving dogs and pets as I did. I would like to stress that I am a dog lover, in spite of my own and many other kids coming and going my house is empty, and I am lonely, without a dog. I plan to purchase Your Puppy 8 Weeks to 8 Months and Basic Obedience dvds this next time I raise a dog.

If you are able to steer us to the best breeds for our family I would be very appreciative. I thought I had done the research into the right breed and breeder with our GSP.

This next time I would like to avoid major pack order or dominance challenges with so many children in my life. Kids are unpredictable, we need a dog who can cope with that. Kids like to play with, train, hug and sometimes kiss their pets even though this is not natural for dogs.

We are drawn to sporting, herding, working breeds because we like clever, energetic, playful, medium to large dogs. Maybe we are looking in the wrong direction?

Thank you for being a dog lover. Thank you for sharing your extensive knowledge and experience with the rest of us who are not experts but would like to raise and treat their dogs with the respect they deserve.

Sandra

ps - I have visited the AKC web site. and they do not really indicate which breeds are best for children (mine are ages 7-10). Probably it is more about lineage than breed but I am lost on where to go for guidance on temperament concerns. Our last breeder was sure our GSP would be a great family pet.....

Ed's Answer on what breed to buy:

You need to find a breed of dogs with NO TEETH - the famous toothless dog. This is not a breed issue. It’s a handler issue.

If you get a pup with good nerves and you establish pack structure and train the dog you can have a safe pet.

While you think you had established pack structure with your last dog in fact you had not. That’s pretty obvious.

The fact is the foundation of pack structure is more important than obedience training – I tell people that hundreds of thousands of dogs go through OB training every year and the vast majority of dominant dogs come out of training just as dominant as when they started. That’s because the instructor did not address pack structure. You fell into that category.

I have written on this and I have DVDs that train people.

I recommend that you go to my web site and read the article I wrote on my philosophy of dog training. I think you will get some good ideas there.

Regards,
Ed


My wife broke a finger and a toe breaking up a fight, not to speak of lacerations, and broke another finger very badly on another fight.

Ed:

We have 6 adopted (shelter,etc.) spayed female dogs. We have a 9 yr. old Peke with a weak back that gives her problems often, mild hip Dysplasia (spelling ?) and one eye, the other which was lost a few months ago in a fight with one of our 2 terrier mixes which she hates and attacks on sight. There is no problem with the other 3 dogs. We try to keep them separated which is difficult to always do (and when we forget, there is always a fight). I have been severely bitten on a few occasions; My wife broke a finger and a toe breaking up a fight, not to speak of lacerations, and broke another finger very badly on another fight. (She has M.S. and osteoporosis). We had a highly regarded trainer, Marriam Field-Barbieu, who has patented a few pieces of equipment and written over 30 books on dog training;She worked with us for 14 weeks, was very expensive and as far as I can see has done little to stop the Peke's aggression; the terriers do quite well on the basic commands, however, the Peke still will not remain on a sit-stay or down-stay unless she feels like it. She still would like to kill either or both terriers just as she always has. Some of your material suggests muzzles on all parties...will your "pug-nose cloth muzzle" work on a Peke? Until I read your material & viewed your DVD, "Remote Collar Training for Pet Owners," I was dubious about E-collars; however I now believe your "middle-of-the Road approach" makes sense. We have no alternative to breaking up a dog fight IMMEDIATELY because of the fragile Peke; I broke up the fight in which she lost her eye within 2-3 seconds. Will an E-collar be any danger to the Peke? not the "nick," but will her jumping or reacting harm her back? or hips? We are at wit's end! We have been told to find a home for her, but that would mean finding a home for her sister who is quite docile; plus they love each other, came to us together and we gave our word to not separate them......or euthanasia, which is not an option to us, even with her problems. Will your DVD #301-D be helpful? Do you believe an E-collar would help, not harm her ? Will the "pug-nose" muzzle work? Do we need a "Leerburg Dominant Dog Collar?" I believe you have more insight than anyone I have researched. Your in-put would be very much appreciated. THANK YOU, & we look forward to hearing from you

Bev & Nancy

Ed's Answer to using a remote collars:

No I do not think you should try a remote collar.

You need to get a dog crate for every dog you have and control the free time of these dogs.

I never heard of this trainer you spoke of. She sounds like a rip off artist. But then I have only been training dogs for 45 years and maybe I have not heard of her yet.

Get some dog crates and solve this problem.

Ed


Oh yes, when my two favorite dogs got into a fight and I saw the German shepherd bitch was about to really hurt my chow bitch, like a fool I rushed in. Can you believe I actually had a running water hose in my hand and never thought about it. My shepherd would break when I asked her to, but the chow was wanting to dish out pay back and refused to break contact. So being a junior rocket scientist I grabbed the chows (dam dog) collar and she immediately bit me faster than a hive of hornets can sting. Before I knew it I had been severely bitten three times on the left hand, almost losing an index finger at the first knuckle. One very bad bite to the outer lower leg and an awful bite to the upper left thigh that made me forget sex for so long I almost became a born again eunuch. I wish I had read you article on how to separate dogs before this happened. I now am a breeder of Germ Shepherds and a firm believer in a muzzle, separated kennel rooms and a bucket of ice water, incase the totally unexpected happens. ALSO I HIGHLY RECOMMEND A REFRIGIATOR FILLED WITH A EMERGENCY SUPPLY OF NERVE JUICE AKA Cocktails. I don't have any photos of the bites when they happened, but I can show the scars that I will carry to my grave. Get the book, get the video folks and for heaven sakes read the article.

Gary


Here is an article that was sent to me from a customer:

CAPE COD TIMES
CATAUMET - Police shot and killed a dog after it bit a man and then attacked a police officer last night.

The police were called to Millennium Drive in Cataumet shortly after 9 p.m. because a 39-year-old man, the dog's owner, had been bitten. When police arrived, the dog, an Akita - a Japanese breed originally used for fighting - also attacked the police officer.

The man was reportedly trying to break up a fight between the Akita and another dog.

The officer was not injured, according to the Bourne police. The man was taken to Falmouth Hospital with a serious arm injury, according to Bourne fire officials. The injury was so serious police originally called it a possible amputation, according to fire officials. The police shot the dog after it attacked the officer.

(Published: October 13, 2006)


Comment:

dog bite

That's the best picture I got of it. I saw the fight happening, and went to grab the attacking dog around the neck like an idiot. Instead, I just put the elbow section of my arm into the dog's mouth. I got two punctures (with a lot of bruising around them), and few cuts from her fangs. The marks down toward my wrist are scratches.


Email:

I stumbled upon your web site. Today as I am at my wits end with my dogs. I am sooo stressed and just want to cry. We have had 6 major dog fights in the past 4 years. These fights occur amongst my dogs. Cowboy JRT male almost 4 - aggressive dominant Daisy Pointer mix female 7ish - submissive Sheba Chow mix female 10ish - dominant over pointer, battling it out with the JRT. It is all our fault we are inconstant. Usually the fight is between the 2 girls we are not sure why. Once they bumped into each other and fought and the last time I was by myself I threw the ball for the Jack it went by the chow mix and the Jack jumped on the Pointer mix (she is the submissive one)(who was also running after it) and she rolled over -- next thing I know the girls are locked up fighting and the Jack is biting the Chows back legs (which he shredded). I have included the pics I received from breaking up this fight and the chows injuries. I tried to pull from their scruffs and The chow bit my pinky - I could see her eyes RED RED RED. They go into killer death mode. One of me cannot break up 3 of them. I don't want to pull the Chows back legs cause she is arthritic and it hurts her when I wipe her paws. I think she would bite me too. And when I have gotten them apart the Pointer mix has come back at the chow.

The previous fight that occurred a year and a half before. Was when we moved into a new house. We were sleeping and I woke up at 2 am with the girls fighting on top of me. Some how I got them apart and when I went to get up out of bed the Chow was on the floor next to me I believe she thought I was the pointer and she clamped onto my arm and shook. Her canines left deep puncture wounds in my arm and I had to go to the hospital and lost 2 weeks of work with the horses. I will attach pics of the scars.

The girls themselves have been to the emergency room several times with puncture wounds. My heart cannot take another fight. The chow is getting older and was recently diagnosed with Stage 2 mast cell tumors - cancer. I am afraid the Jack will be more aggressive towards her. He was beaten up by a Boxer at the dog park that we believe started this aggressive dog behavior. Recently the Jack has been more aggressive. Standing on the bed growling at the pointer not to let her in the room. Starring her down in the den. When he tries to get the possum under the shed he'll attack one of the girls instead. When we walk and there is a dog behind a fence the Jack will attack the Chow. I am afraid the Chow will snap and eat him. I am not relaxed around them and I know that is not good. I am going to buy your DVD on aggressive dogs.  

Any thing else you can suggest. We are interviewing dog trainers, but I am not sure that is the answer. I believe we know our basics but need to use them. Sorry the puncture scars aren't to clear. You can see it is a line into the puncture. Not the middle dot that was chicken pocks. So that was my forearm then on the other side was the other puncture only one cause she is missing a canine as a result of another fight Sorry for the long winded email. But like I said I am desperate to keep the family safe. Eventually we would like to get married and have kids but not as long as the dogs are like this. Any further suggestions would be GREATLY appreciated. I hope you get this.

Thanks In Advance,
Katie

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Email:

On Tuesday of this week, my male and female English Pointer had just finished breeding and I opened the kennel to take the female out since she is able to jump the fence. My male Jack Russell ran into the kennel to play and my male pointer attacked him, going for the throat. I tried to separate them, I even put my fingers into the pointer's mouth to open it up. I got my Jack Russell 3 times, but I was being bitten and my Jack Russell wouldn't back down. My poor little Jack Russell was killed by the Pointer. I didn't photograph the bites on my fingers because the swelling has gone down and they don't look very bad anymore.  Here are the bites that were on my legs and hip.

Aubrey

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Email:

Dear Ed,

I really wish we had someone dedicated TO DOGS, their training, and educating others like ourselves, as you are, here in Australia (perhaps there are – I just don’t know them).

I did want to tell you of our experience, as a warning to others.

Initially, we were interested in having Malamutes. We would have bought two as puppies – a male from a local litter and a female from some distance away. Having now read a great deal of what is on our web site., I am glad we didn’t.

But there’s more to the story.

A local “breeder” (whatever that term really infers I now wonder ??? – obviously not knowledge of dogs / pack dominance / training etc. etc. etc.) invited us to come and see his current litter.

He allowed ALL ten of our children (aged between 8 and 26), my husband and I to ‘socialize’/ ‘handle’ his puppies, from 6 weeks of age. At times the bitch was present; at times not. He always kept her in his charge if she was present. We helped him feed the puppies at times.

This we did for a few days each week for two weeks.

This breeder also had other dogs. One dominant male malamute (he often referred to this dog as his ‘alpha’ and kennel mascot); a couple of female malamutes – mother (this same mother was mother to the ‘alpha’ dog), and a sister to the female that had had the puppies; and several Golden retrievers.

I really wish we had had all your information earlier because an absolutely awful incidence arose.

One rather hot afternoon, we went to visit the puppies (at seven weeks). It was to be our last visit before bringing our puppy home. Upon invitation, we went through the owner’s garage into his back yard where the puppies were with the mother freely wondering around the yard. The large male was tethered to a long lead that was attached to a backyard pergola. The “breeder” told us that he (the male dog) was grumpy that day because of the heat, so he had put him on the long lead, so he could get under the shade of some distant fruit trees. (This “alpha” had previously snarled at a number of our children on other of our visits.)

The owner went to see off some other visitors leaving us to happily ‘socialize’ with the puppies.

One puppy had gotten itself under the back veranda and the owner had asked the children to see if they could maybe coax it out as he had been unsuccessful in being able to get it out.

A number of our youngest children were at the veranda already, when our 11 year old son walked over to see how their efforts were going.

Our son was unaware the male 'alpha' malamute had ‘literally’ crept up behind him, crouched. Two of the older boys had seen it though, but were unaware of its intentions.

With a growl, the male malamute lunged forward. Our son, having heard the growl swiftly turned to see the dog and copped the full force of the dogs bite to the right side of his face and left side of his neck, mouth fully open. The dog gave him a hard shake, then, THANKFULLY, let go, and retreated, having missed his initial aim of the throat.

Horrified children began screaming, “(the dog) bit him.”

Our son, dazed by the attack, and not really aware of his injures, ran to me.

Well, I went weak at the knees at the sight. First I saw his chin torn open; then I realized this neck was open as well. Blood began to run.

I called to our eldest children to call for an ambulance, as the owner came following out of his shed to see what had happened (he never saw the dog bite because he was getting food out from the freezer for the malamutes). My husband and I ushered our son into the garage, while giving instructions to the other children.

The injuries (see photos attached) were severe and almost through to the main artery of his neck. His chin was torn open through to the inside of his mouth, and as we were to find out later, had severed muscle off the bone.

A rapid trip to the hospital ensued with me holding his face and chin together.

Surgery. Multiple suturing.

Days in hospital.

The unexpected swelling was shocking to us all.

Visits to specialists all followed.

The worst of the story:

This owner KNEW his dog was registered and declared as a DANGEROUS DOG here with the shire council.

There are very specific laws in Australia to be adhered to, to be allowed to keep such a dog/s.

In fact, two of his dogs fell into this category as dangerous dogs.

Together, the ‘mother’ and ‘alpha’ had previously killed a pet sheep and gotten themselves the title – DANGEROUS DOG.

The “breeder” had broken ALL of these laws – no fully enclosed pen (top, bottom, and sides), no “Dangerous Dog” signs on all entrances to his property, no muzzle when out of a pen, not allowed in the presence of children under 17 years (he let all our children run around the yard with this dog on a lead - with no muzzle), failed to notify council he had moved house/property with his dog/s, no red and yellow striped collar on his dog to identify it as Dangerous, etc. We had no idea it (and the “mother”) was a dangerous dog.

THIS SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN ALLOWED TO HAPPEN.

A law suit followed, taken up by the shire council, who “dealt” with the dog (after the owner was told of the implications had surrendered the dog), for which the offender/law breaker was fined a mere $500.00.

SHAME! SHAME! SHAME! – Such an irresponsible “breeder” to intentionally allow this to happen (perhaps it could have been his own baby boy, or have led to death).

Ed, perhaps you would have been a good advocate in our Australian law courts in such situations.

I am happy to say that my son’s injuries healed well, without infection. Our son had loss of sensation to a section of his chin area for some time, most of which has now returned. His smile remains a little crocked but not enough for further corrective surgery, just now.

Time having past, our son has lost his initial fear of dogs, though any dog rushing at him still leads to his retreat behind us. This happens all to often.

Reader:
DO NOT LET YOURSELF EVER, EVER GET INTO THIS TYPE OF SITUATION.
SOMEONE’S LIFE WILL BE AT RISK!
BE A RESPONSIBLE DOG OWNER and HANDLER!
FOLLOW SOUND TRAINING INSTRUCTION!

If only we had had Ed's knowledge of dogs before this had happened, it would have been prevented.

Feel free to share our DISASTEROUS experience with others that it may never happen to anyone else.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR FREE ADVICE AND HELPFUL INFORMATION ON YOUR WEB SITE.

With your help we will get it right with our two GSD.

Kind regards, 
Jenny
Victoria, Australia

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Email:

Dear Ed or Cindy,

Please guide me as to what steps I need to take, which videos/equipment I need to buy- or even if you think this situation is redeemable at all.

My dog Bisou (three years, not spayed, oddly has not come into season in a year after having has 3 heat cycles- never been bred), pictured, and Baer, my other shepherd, broke the board on the fence lock, got out, and proceeded to terrorize my neighbors, biting one (pictured) and charging and rushing others. I was at work and unreachable.

The man she bit was my next door neighbor and he was just going from his car into his house. He said there was no barking, the dogs came up to him, he didn't run, just said "hi" and when he proceeded to his door was attacked and bit from behind.

My other neighbors tried to put the dogs away- they all thought they were friendly, as they see me or my 8 year old daughter walking them and stop and say 'hi' and pet them, etc.

However, Bisou was NOT friendly, and charged across the street aggressively and chased a man back into his house with his dog- he later came out and pepper sprayed her. Another neighbor, Joe, was getting barked at by Bisou and he told her to 'sit' and she did. He said my other dog was lying in my yard calmly.

Animal control was called, and my neighbor Dave was worried for my dogs who (he thought) he knew and tried to get then back into the fence. Baer complied however Bisou was viscous and and barked and growled and when Dave told her to 'get in the yard' she jumped and bit his hip- no damage, thank goodness. He did manage to get them in the fence and block it with a garbage can. While his actions were stupid I am very lucky. Kids would have been walking home from school shortly- God forbid what could have happened.

I know I belong on the 'dumb and dumber' page- I'm so sorry I let this happen. Here are the warning signs I've noticed- surely there were more but I have been too ignorant to notice or recall. Bisou has charged up, barking, to people walking by in the street before- four times. She is three years old. Every time it has been when I am unaware and in the house- the gate or front door was left open. Once we were on a walk at dusk and I was talking to people and not paying attention, and a teenager ran up to us. Bisou barked threateningly at the girl. I gave a very harsh correction, subsequently the dog sniffed and licked the girl.

I taught her to not run out the door. I have her off leash in the front yard with me and strangers are greeted by a friendly dog. She listened to my commands and my daughters, on or off leash. We've worked in as many environments as I can think of- the city, the park, wherever. She has always been friendly towards other dogs. She is respectful to my guests and enjoys attention from them, but if they are not 'dog people' I have no problem telling her to 'go lie down' and she'll leave them alone. The dogs have their CGC's and Bisou knows many competition obedience maneuvers. She has never been a problem whether walking her to school to get my daughter, at dog 'gatherings' with other people and dogs, etc. She was uneasy in her training for the 'stand for exam' when I am at a distance, but certainly never looked aggressive- she just broke her stand a lot until she learned not to.

As a pup I worried she lacked confidence but she seemed to overcome her fears the more we explored the world and by a year or so there were no more 'scary piles of leaves' and she seemed not to have a confidence/fear problem. She likes to chase things, and when she is engaged in watching something of interest she can take a very strong correction and recover quickly. I learned that teaching her not to chase the ducks at the pond.

My best guess is that Bisou must not worry in my presence and thinks in my absence she needs to take charge. The aggression and violence she displayed yesterday sickens me. I am so over my head I don't know what to think or do.
My husband (serving the US Army in Korea) said not to get rid of her rashly, so I will see if I can get a grip first.

Obviously this dog needs to be contained 100% of the time. What of my daughter? Me? Could this dog turn on us? Do we have a monster that needs to be killed? Should I muzzle her at all times?

I boarded my dogs with a professional trainer this summer while my daughter and I visited my husband in Korea. (she does competition obedience with her Tervs and Dobermans and herding with her Border Collies- multiple OTCH's and high in trials with different dogs, etc.) She was completely dumbstruck when I related yesterday's events. She had the dogs 2 and 1/2 months and saw no dog or people aggression issue what-so-ever, no separation anxiety, etc. Nor do the dogs ever try to 'escape'- not for her or me, in my house or yard. She said she knew my dogs and they were provoked in some form or another- not to justify what happened, of course- but she insisted there was a reason. I don't know what to think.

Biting humans just seems like a thing that is not redeemable- how could I teach a dog that it is so utterly unacceptable whether the animal is in my presence or not that I could be sure it would never bite another human again?

There are as many different opinions on this as people I know. I need sound advice, and I have your tapes with you and Cindy and I trust you.
Please tell me the appropriate course of action.

I am so sorry. I thought I was a good dog owner. People always complimented me on my well trained dogs. I am such a clueless fool. I can never let this happen again.

I thank you in advance for your advice- I can't thank you enough, as I am in desperate need of sound guidance.

Sincerely,
Laura

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Email:

Ed,

First, thanks again for all you have done and continue to do for dog lovers and trainers throughout the world. I have a concern and wanted to post it directly to you rather than through the discussion board and am looking for your advice. Recently I joined a club to train my dog as a PPD. The club director and I have recently come to an agreement. He has a 5 year old male Malinois that is his PSA competition dog and needs a Helper to assist in the training. Since I have expressed an interest in becoming a Helper (I have bought an studied your 2 DVDs Training the New Helper and Advanced Trial Helper Training), the trainer offered to work with training my young dog (10 months old) and in return I will become a Helper for him to train his dog.

The first day I showed up, I thought I would be putting on a sleeve (as I had never taken a bite and had no training). However, he had me get into a full body bite suit, which showed some signs of wear on the upper left arm. Regardless, we went through the training session.
However, while in the bite suit, when the dog bit (it is trained to bite the upper left arm pit area when the Helper is facing him and bite his leg when running away. The leg bites pinched a bit but were not particularly bothersome, however, the arm bites were altogether different. I could feel the bite much more, it was more than a strong pinch, in fact when I took the suit off I could se that the dog actually broke my skin. The trainer wanted to work together for an hour daily, however, as you can see in the photo, there is no way I can continue to takes bites on that area of my arm.

So my questions to you are:

1. Does this look like a normal effect after a bite session on a bite suit?
2. How do I continue to train with him and his dog until the arm heals?
3. Is there a way to tell if the suit is not properly fitted and if it is not, is this one of the side effects of an ill fitting suit?

I apologize for the long email, however, I wanted to have your personal opinion and not post to your discussion board as the trainer most likely reads it and I did not want to damage our relationship without first understanding if it was something I was doing wrong or something I could prevent or if it is simply the nature of the business and I need to suck it up.

Thanks for taking the time.

Regards,
Al

P.S.
Picture was taken after icing for two hours.

Dog Bite


Email:

Mr. Frawley,  

I just finished reading your well written article on breaking up a dog fight. Nearly two years ago I had two female mastiffs go after each other in my kitchen. I made the horrible mistake of grabbing their collars in an effort to break up the fight. Attached you will find the pictures of my arm. In total I needed 50 sutures to close the wounds. As you can see, the wound at my wrist came very close to hitting the ulnar and radial arteries. The doctors were not able to leave either of the wounds completely open because they were gaping. I did end up with cellulitis and a subsequent staph infection. I spent a very long time on antibiotics trying to get the infection under control.

It is with relief that I tell you that I have not had to experience another dog fight since that time. I still raise, show and breed mastiffs. I currently have seven and they all live in peace. I always keep a watchful eye on body language and interactions between the dogs, watching for red flags. The fight experience I had is something I will never forget, but it taught me several very valuable lessons.

I think you've given some wonderful advice in your article. I will share the information with my network of mastiff folks. Thanks for the helpful ideas.  

Jennifer

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Email:

I saw on another area of the site that you requested pictures of dog bites incurred in the process of breaking up a dog fight. Attached you will find some pictures of my leg after being bitten by my now neutered JRT. He and my 27 mo. Standard Poodle have done this twice.  Both times the JRT started it but the Poodle was intent on finishing it. These bite marks were deep puncture wounds and you can clearly see the jaw line of the JRT. The wound is about 6 weeks old. The first time the JRT was almost killed but even when I had them separated he came back for more on death's doorstep. I had him neutered and this time I knew better. I forgot that the Poodle was in the other room out of his crate and let the JRT out. Immediately he made a beeline to the Poodle. I couldn't watch that again so I got in the middle of them and pulled them apart. As I was doing that the JRT who is only about 10"stood up and nailed my thigh. 

There are reminders on the crates so that this never happens again. Interesting that he and my one female Poodle have a ball playing and don't fight, just argue occasionally. I have another female Poodle as well but she has never been out with any of them because I can't afford to take a chance with her while showing in conformation. My Poodle boy somehow managed to loose a front incisor in this last go around and he now has scarring on his muzzle so I guess that his show career is over.

On another note, I was reading your section on wolf hybrids and found it fascinating and it made perfect sense to me. I live in TN, but, am not originally from here. Unfortunately I see this maddening attitude everyday. Some days I don't think that I can handle a minute more of it.  My next door neighbor thinks that my Poodles are silly and that I ought to let the JRT go out and boar hunt. He loves the aggression. Well there is going to be a new sheriff in town. I plan on ordering several of your DVDs if I am going to have a house full. 

BTW, my show girl is as fierce and stubborn as they come. She is barely a year and takes a firm hand like one might use with a GSD. This is unusual for a Poodle, but, it is in her lines.  Her daddy was the number 1 Poodle in the country for a few years, but, was know to be intelligent, stubborn and bordering on dog aggressive. I knew this when I got her and thought that I was prepared, but, I think that I need to get a little more prepared. I have video of her squaring off with a professional handler that is one of the best in the middle of a specialty ring.  Once she gets that she is not going to win the battle she becomes compliant, but, it is an ever vigilant task. The other night she went to the crate of the other female and growled because I was kneeling down paying attention to her. When that didn't work she ran up behind me and locked down on the back of my arm. I snatched her up and threw her in her crate. I was warned that she would need to be reminded that there is only one boss in the house and it's not her! 

Thanks for all the great info. I wish that you were training trainers. I would love to learn from you.

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Email:

I got this when I broke up a fight between my mastiff and my boxer.  No fun.

T

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Dog Bite:

Hi there, Ed and Cindy:

Your site said you were always looking for pictures of bites, so I’m sending my pic and the history of the bite so your readers don’t make the same mistakes we did – things snowball fast. Also, we need your help.

We have two Bloodhounds adopted from a rescue. Boomer is a 110 lb. neutered male who appeared to have a sweet, though dominant, temperament – we thought he was just a big goofball and got lazy with the hound. My husband had a heart attack and I got incredibly ill with a two-week-long flu during his recovery. We were literally sick and tired and allowed him on the couch during this time. When my husband was a bachelor, he let his dog sleep in the bed – luckily, his former hound was the sweetest dog you’d ever come across and this caused him no trouble. Boomer, however, has dominance issues, like putting his paw over your arm when you’re petting; and when we first got him, he would nip at your clothing and jump up on any- and everyone. We beat that over time and he hadn’t nipped at anyone for about a year-and-a-half.

One morning, I was in bed with a 103-degree fever and my husband let the dog into the bedroom thinking I’d want company while I was making deals with the heavens for my flu to pass (Boomer had never been allowed in the room, let alone on the bed). I’d never felt so miserable, even when I’d had pneumonia. Anyway, Boomer jumped on the bed and I didn’t make him get off and continued to rest. After about 20-30 minutes, I sat up and leaned over to pet him and get some sympathy…wrong. I don’t know if he was just pissed or if I perhaps hurt or startled him because he was sort of tucked in the crook of my knees and I bent directly over him for some cuddling. Dumb-Dumb-Dumb! I knew better, but my head was swimming and I wasn’t thinking. He got ‘whale-eye’ for just a moment and I knew I was in trouble but did not have time to react when, without a growl or anything, he bit me in the face. When I screamed, he ran to his crate to hide. The bite, as you can see, could have cost me an eye, as there is a contusion on the white of my eye where one of his teeth scraped. The bite cost me a trip to emergency in my pj’s – sick already, and I had 8 stitches on the triangular tear below my eye and two on the opposite side of my nose. It also cost us trust of this previously not-perfect, but pretty-good-natured dog.

Our vet advised us to put him down, and I couldn’t do it – it was completely our fault and I didn’t think he should pay the ultimate price for my stupidity. We consulted a behaviorist for an aggression consultation and purchased several of your DVDs, including Dealing with Dominant and Aggressive Dogs and Basic Dog Obedience. We also purchased a Dogtra e-collar and the e-collar training DVD, though I’ve been afraid to use it because both the trainer and a family member who fosters shepherds say it would be dangerous to do so. The behaviorist said that he’ll always have dominance issues and that it will be a life-long struggle to maintain. That’s fine with me but I don’t want to make another costly mistake. Luckily, I work from home and don’t have any wee ones, so I’m willing to do whatever is necessary to give the hound a happy, healthy life. That entails a lot of walking, but I just cannot control such a huge, driven dog by myself.

Sorry this is becoming a novella, but we have another problem. When we first got Boomer, I was able to walk both the dogs at the same time with no trouble for several months. One day, we were walking on an adjacent block when a huge, unleashed St. Bernard pounced on my other hound, knocking her to the ground, while her hill-jacker owner sat in his truck and watched – and did NOTHING. I knew there was no breaking up this fight safely with no help from the dirt bag owner, so I just yanked hard on both my dogs’ leashes and we ran from the offender. After that incident, Boomer howled and lunged any time he saw ANY other dog besides my other hound, whether he’s at the yard’s fence or on a lead. He’s an embarrassment to walk and frightens owners and dogs alike, his howl carrying for – quite literally – miles.

Finally, could you please advise on the e-collar training and offer any advice you can on this specific situation? I’m not looking for free services…I’d be happy to pay for a phone consultation or something, as your expertise and experience are phenomenal and I hold you and your organization in very high regard – it’s just so hard to find professional advice in line with my own philosophies…i.e., family members and behaviorists who use and advise absolutely no corrections, solely positive reinforcement and say I should put the dog down or never correct his behavior.

Thanks so much. I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

Dog bite to face

Ed's Answer:

Shellie

Thanks for sending your story and for your business.

You must use remote collars on this dog. Start working this dog in marker training. Follow the work in my article. Become an expert on the details of that article. After “charging the mark” start using markers to put the remote collar on the dog. It only needs to stay on for a few second then take it off – and use markers to put it back on. Go slow here – mark the collar being near the dog, then touching the neck etc etc until the dog is allowing you to put the collar on before you mark/reward. When this is done correctly the dog will not feel threatened when you put the collar on.

These dogs need to have remote collar work with dog aggression. This means the instant the dogs see another dog they get the highest level of stimulation. You don’t wait for him to fire up – you stimulate for looking at another dog. You should probably have the male in muzzle for handler aggression issues. Use the wire basket muzzles. When the dog understands the work he will start to turn his head away from another dog. When that happens you can often reduce the level of stimulation and only go with a nick. This is all a factor of experience with your dog.

I would be using dog crates for these dog. They should go through my pack structure program - Establishing Pack Structure with the Family Dog.

Life as they know it needs to end until you have control again. Your husband needs to buy into this program or it won’t work. Don’t underestimate how important this work is.

Typical dumb ass advice from your Vet. The behaviorist is correct, dominant dogs will always have to be controlled. You cannot ever allow them to opportunity to demonstrate dominance (ie. Lay on furniture or a bed etc etc) That doesn’t mean you have to kill the dog, it simply means that you need to be aware that the dog is dominant and you need to be prepared to be a pack leader.

I would have filed a police report against the red neck that allowed his dog to attack your dogs.

Kind Regards,

Ed


Dog Bite:

Just a couple of deep scratches, but some intense, painful and swollen bruising. This is two days after the fact and the swelling is 90% gone.

Found your web site. the next day - next time I'm going for the back legs.

I tried to stop a fight between my two dogs - something I don't usually do - but this one was nasty and I got concerned. The pit-lab got me - grazed my leg as he lunged at my akita-mix. Bad morning.

Thanks for your informative web site.

The akita is staying leashed to my side now and the pit-lab stays with either my husband or I. No one gets free run of the house anymore. Both dogs seem to like it. It's quite obvious that they'd rather not fight.  We'd dropped the ball with ground work and pack structure.  With two males, of roughly the same size and age - both dog aggressive breeds - we can't ever afford to slack off.  Learned it the hard way....

Thanks for all the info. I was glued to your web site. for the first 24 hours after their fight.  Just for the record, we ARE searching out professional help with this.

>>Sarah<<

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Dog Bite:

I just came across your web site. WOW! I have been doing a lot of things the wrong way. This is what happens when you have 4 dogs fighting at once. Boxers and a Great Dane. This happened in May. I no longer have these dogs. I did place them in only dog homes and that they needed obedience training. I do keep in touch with the people that have my dogs.

They tell me that the dogs are doing well. I know now that I felled at being a pack leader.. I kept thinking what was going on and what was I doing wrong. Sometimes I would just walk into a room and all of them would just start fighting for no reason. I am glad that I came across your site. I am writing to you and sending these photo to you please try to get your message out to other people that think any and all dogs are just cute little things. These photo's are of when i got home from the hospital. These are the after photos.

Many thanks and keep up the Great Work!!

John and Maria

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Dog Bite:

I've been lurking and saw that you want photos of injuries as a result of breaking up a dogfight. We took in a 6-7 year old Great Dane that had been running the streets. We already had 3 other Danes. One day Cass (the new girl) decided she didn't like Annie, our 2 year old blind Dane. This picture was taken right after the fight. I ended up in the hospital for 3 days on IV antibiotics. We still have her and that is how I found your web site., looking for a 'humane' muzzle.  

~Patty

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Dog Bite:

My brothers own a pit bull named Grim.  She is between 4 and 6 years old, I don't really spend a lot of time around my brothers so I don't know.  I met her for the first time 3 days after my oldest brother's ex wife killed herself and my mother and I flew to where he lives to be there for him.  That was July 4Th this year.  About 10 minutes before we went to get our things out of my brother's truck Grim was sitting by my feet with her head in my lap just letting me pet her.  She really is a beautiful dog... and if you think this is all about praising aggressive dogs it stops after saying she's pretty... As my mother, my cousin who had also come to help out, and I went to get our things I was pulled to the ground by Grim.  I could feel her teeth ripping through my jeans and into the side of my left leg.  I kicked frantically.  I managed to shake free for a moment and started to climb up the side of my brother's truck.  By this time their pet German shepherd had broken free of his chain and wanted in on all the fuss.  He grabbed me around my ankle and pulled me back to the ground where Grim got me again just below my right knee.  I don't remember kicking them both off, but my mother, who couldn't get near enough to help and was trying to stay in between the dogs and my cousin who could make a toothpick look fat, my mother says that I did and climbed into the cab of my brother's truck and shut the doors.  I do remember the younger of my 2 older brothers coming and taking hold of the dogs and climbing into my cousin's truck and her taking me across the alleyway to the hospital.  My brother did pick a good location when house hunting, as he has 5 little boys and a little girl to care for.  As soon as they took me into the ER I remember that they didn't have to cut my jeans to see the wounds they were that torn up.  At one point the doctor needed to inject an anesthetic into my left leg so that he could assess the damage.  The first time he did the liquid shot out the other end of the wound, just on the other side of my chin bone... you should be able to tell where when you look at the pictures.  After the anesthetic took effect he put his long finger into one side of the wound and followed the path of the liquid through a hole big enough for a grown man's finger to fit through.  They decided after I'd been there maybe 40 minutes to take me into surgery.  When I woke up 3 hours later I was told that between what the dog had torn out and what they had to cut out due to damage I had lost about 1.5 pounds of flesh, half a pound being muscle mass from my left leg.  It has been 4 months now and I am able to stand for about a half hour at a time, and I have been told not to let my left leg swell from any strenuous activity for another 2 months as the skin is laying directly on the muscle and they don't want to risk it pulling away.  I now have an inch deep well at the center side of my left leg.  On my right leg there are 2 long lines around the back of my ankle making it now look like a scalloped edge instead of the attractive curve my high heels used to show off.  By my knee on my right leg I look like I have a series of age spots that start just under the center of my knee very tiny and as they move toward the outer knee get larger... the largest the size of a medium grape.  To top off all the damage my brother's dog inflicted the younger of my older brothers has recently told my baby sister that they're keeping the dog as they're not sure it was his precious Grim that bit me... even though I have 3 different size and shape bites that couldn't have been both caused by just one dog...  One of my father's good friends who is a cop where my brother's live is taking the necessary steps to make sure that animal never has the chance to even sniff another person again... As for the other dog, the German shepherd, he was poisoned while my brother was out of town over things dealing with the death of his ex wife, and trying to keep custody of his stepson-- he believes it was the work of the boy's paternal grandmother who had been harassing him over the child.  Nothing could be proven on that and so nothing was done.

I hope to God that what happened to me will teach people that large aggressive dogs are not safe as house pets.  And I pray every night that dog doesn't get hold of one of my nephews, ranging in age from 4 to 10, or my niece who is 3.

Signed, 
A 24 year old woman who thanks God she survived

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Dog Bite:

Hello,

I often check your web site for help with my two GSD females.

I recently had to break up a fight between them. I was in a worse situation, as I was by myself, and outside of the house. They got into it over a snowball. One of them is 6 and the other just turned 1. It was the young one that attacked the first as she is kind of jealous of any affection or attention. She probably wants to establish her position now that she is coming of age. Otherwise they sleep together, eat together, and there is usually no problems with them. She is also the one who got me, although she did not attack me per say. I just wanted to share the pictures with you as you ask on your site.

This is a great web site and source of information.

Thank you,
Monika

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Dog Bites:

Hello Ed,

I received the DVDs and collar. I watched the e-collar DVD and Aggressive Dogs DVD and I like it. You cover some great points. Up until now I've been watching the Dog Whisperer and it looks your techniques are similar which I like.  It makes total sense. I do have a few questions:

1. It's my understanding in your DVD that when my dog shows aggression while I have the dominant collar on, I am to immediately pull up and stay there until he calms down. Is that correct?

2. When using  the e-collar to make the dog avoid looking at another dog, at what point can I move to the next step? By that I mean, I think the next step would be to allow another calm submissive dog to smell my dog, is that correct?

My biggest problem and what brought me to this point is exactly what you talk about in your videos. My dog was attacked by a very large short hair male 1 year ago and my dog unfortunately was on the chain at the time so he was defenseless. I of course jumped in to break them up and got severely bit in the wrist (pic attached) by my own dog! I have since taken dog aggression very very seriously.

I thought I was doing great in following Cesar's way but I find I tense up at time and create the fights. This is because I never trust the handler on the other end with another dog and always have my scenario playing in the back of my mind. I know this makes me a weak pack leader. I have to take this"bull" by the horns I guess and put the past behind me. Any further advice will be greatly appreciated!

Thank you for your help!

John

dog bite

Ed's Response:

John,

First thanks for your business and the photo. A hard lesson to learn.

Caesar seems like a very nice guy. He has done a lot to make people understand that dogs are pack animals. Unfortunately a lot of the things he shows should not be attempted by the average dog owner – IE ALPHA ROLES are very very dangerous and in my opinion no one should try them.
Yet he shows them a lot on his show. I know a women in CA that got almost 100 stitches in her face trying to do it on her GSD.

Caesar also doesn’t understand low level stimulation training with remote collars. In my opinion that's the power of training with remote collars. The shows I have seen he uses remote collars to extinguish behavior with high level avoidance training. There are applications for that – dog aggression and/or handler aggression is one of them. But the dog should have a muzzle on for handler protection.

The dominant dog collar is effective if used properly. How long you life the dogs front feet off the ground depends on the dog. In some extreme handler aggression cases it has to be until the dog passes out. In other cases it only needs to be long enough for the dog to realize he just broke a pack leader rule. So there is no standard answer for this question.

Your question on allowing another neutral dog around your dog is a good one. The way we handle it is our dog would never be allowed around another dog that was outside his family pack. There is no need to do this – none what so ever. You run the risk of your dog striking out and then you have another arm bite problem. Although you may want to refer to my article on how to break up a dog fight without getting hurt.

I know what Caesar does with brining his other animals around aggressive dogs. What you don’t see are the number of times that this does not work because it failures were cut out of the show. I would have to agree to disagree with what the shows on this issue. There is too much room for errors when non-dog professionals try this and when problems happen and they will the result is traumatic.

Good luck with your dog.

Kind Regards,
Ed Frawley


Question:

Here you go, Ed.  Lovely, huh?  This was a redirected bite on my forearm this past October from a client's Jack Russell Terrier that aggressed at my GSD.  My fault, of course.  My assistant had the JRT's leash and the JRT lunged, the leash came out of her hand and I stood in front of my dog with my arms out to the sides to prevent the client's dog from getting hurt by my dog - pretty stupid - sometimes my reflexes are good and other times, I want to kick my own ass.  The left photo was the top of my forearm (upper canines) and the right photo is the bottom of my forearm (bottom canines).  Full mouth bite, canines sunk all the way in and 2-3 quick shakes.

Leah

dog bite dog bite

Ed’s Answer:

Ouch – one thing is for sure – you will NEVER let something like this happen again. It is one way to develop the philosophy of “if it can happen it will happen so err on the side of safety.”

Thank much for sending this.

Kind Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

This happened while trying to break up a fight between family dogs. My mother-in-law and I both got bit by her dog. I was trying to grab my puppy which is not a small dog and not timid and pull her by her collar. I got pulled down by the two dogs and fell between them. My shoulder got bit and my right hand. I now have to go for surgery to correct the thumb nail, that may never grow back correctly, and the bone broke also.

Mandy

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Dog Bite:

I recently rescued a pit bull mix. She's about 1 year old. Yesterday my 3 year-old male beagle walked by her and growled and the pit bull attacked. They've gotten into quite a few scuffles before and I've easily separated them but this time was much different. They fought for a good five minutes. The pit bull is very strong and was picking my beagle up by the neck and swinging him around. I thought for sure he was dead because of the amount of blood. I kept trying to pull the pit off of him but her jaw was locked. At one point I gave up and started screaming and crying because I was horrified. My brother heard this and ran downstairs. He pulled the beagle and I pulled the pit bull by the legs and we got the separated. However, the beagle who was clearly losing ran back at her and started the fight again. I pushed him away with my arm and he latched on and started shaking it. When he realized it was me, he ran away and I put the pit outside. She had very minor cuts and gashes but my beagle, Toby was soaked in blood. I've included a picture of his neck. My brother called 911 and the paramedics were there very fast. My arm was gushing with blood and my finger was black/blue and swollen. We also had to rush Toby to the animal emergency room. It was an awful day.

Anyway, I wish I had known your techniques before I tried to intervene like that. I panicked and I didn't know what else to do. The bite was worth it because I don't think my beagle would have made it through if I hadn't tried to stop it. However, next time I'll definitely know better. We've given the pit to someone else. And Toby is quarantined by animal control for ten days.

Sincerely,
Marissa

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Ed’s Answer:

Thank you so much for taking the time to send this.

I will post it to our web site with the hopes it will help others learn how dangerous breaking up a dog fight can be.

Best of luck for your beagle.

Kind Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

These are bites on one hand I received breaking up a fight between two Boxer bitches. Not really serious, once all the blood was washed off.....but could have been. Also a lot of bruising came afterwards, and restricted the use of this hand for a few days.

Am just trying to wade through your wealth of information.

We have raised and trained Rottweilers, Shepherds and Boston Terriers over the years. We now own Boxers and St. Bernards. The worst fights I've had to break up have been between the terriers. They simply don't let go, nor do they quit.

Jean

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Dog Bite:

Hello Ed and Cindy.

I have e mailed you a few time for training advice so thank you for that.

I would like some advice on what I should do regarding my 15month intact male GSD, today I made a very stupid mistake which led to my dog attacking my father in my back garden, the dog had found an apple which had fallen from the tree and my father tried to pick it off the ground from in front of the dog, this triggered an attack and he was bitten on the hand and back and when I pulled the dog of him I was bitten on both arms and hands, I only had a short pull tab on a dominant dog collar so when I tried to choke out the dog he was still able to bite me so I had to take him to the ground and choke him until he was out cold.
We obviously both needed medical attention.

I will list the mistakes I know I made.
1 – The dog should have been in kennel/crate with visitors.
2 – He should have been on lead.
3 – I should not have let my father play/interact with the dog.

I broke handling rule 101 and I know this incident was my fault and I will have the scars to remind me of this moment’s foolishness for many years to come.

Now where do I go from here, I hold no grudge towards my dog, but is the relationship between my dog and myself damaged?

As far as handling a dog post attack is it business as usual? any suggestions on where to go from here? I am still committed to keep the dog if possible.

Answer:

I would recommend a couple of DVDs to help you:

Establishing Pack Structure with the Family Dog
And
The Power of Training Dog with Markers

The pack structure dvd is a must. It shows the dog (without any force) that you control every second of his life and you are the person who determines if he has any good things happen. It accomplishes this without going to war with the dog.

The marker training is the best way to begin the re-introduction to training with a dominant dog because it is 100% motivational. Do not misunderstand how important this is. You will have to reach a point – some time down the road where correction are going to be required but not now. Get your foundation built. These two dvds teach you how to do this.

Also read the free ebook or article I wrote on Marker Training. Don’t just read this- study it – understand the details of it. The power of this work is in the details.

If you have any photos of these bite wounds I would appreciate seeing them. I am writing a book on dog aggression and collecting photos for the book. They may help others.

Kind Regards,
Ed

Thank You:

Thanks for advice;

I have these 2 DVDs as well as dominant dog DVD. I have run my dog through the pack program which I thought had been successful; he used to pull on lead on walks and only come when he felt like, after I ran though the pack program he stopped pulling and recall was great.

Should I back up the training and repeat the foundation aspect of the pack structure program, perhaps the dog needs to be in the early phase of the pack program for much longer?

I have added some photos of my wounds, please note these are 24hours after the event when they were being re-dressed also a couple of photos of the dog ”Zeus”.

Thanks again…

Kind Regards,
Neil

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Dog Bite:

I spent the better part of today reading your articles on dog aggression and dog bites.

I have an old picture of what happens when someone tries to step in between two dogs squaring off without actually fighting.

A few months ago, a friend of mine was over to visit, and see my then 8 month old Border Collie Shepherd mix that I had agreed to take and had recently received from a former neighbor. I was convinced that she had at one point been abused for being aggressive, since she would cringe and skulk away for being disciplined, because she was (and still is a bit) mouthy, and is also very protective.

My boyfriend has a 6 year old Pit bull. He is usually very mellow and laid back, and has never been aggressive towards people or dogs. I was preparing dinner, and they had just spent an hour in the yard playing fetch. My pup was sitting about 10 feet away from me, watching very intently to what I was doing. My boyfriend's pit came up to investigate what I was doing, and Tab growled, her head and tail went flush with her back, and every hair on her back stood on end. Hobbs did not yield, and the tension between them became increasingly heavy.

My friend, a recent college graduate with a major in psychology of all things, came over, bent down next to Tab to pet her, and she grabbed his face and shook him violently.
The whole ordeal lasted all of a minute. Luckily she missed his eye, barely, but since then we have taken extra precautions to keep her from being in a situation like that again, even though we have managed to (almost) re-train her, and my friend has since stayed far from her jaws.

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Dog Bite:

When I was 7 I was walking across the neighbors yard (they said I could since I lived on a busy rode) their dog lunged at me. I lost 75% of my blood and my arm was close to coming off. They had to give 21 shots to numb my arm and it took 7 nurses and 3 doctors to hold me down. I was going nuts. I understand what all these people feel but I got lucky and the scars aren't on a big part of my body and I didn't loss my arm. The scar use to be closer  together but I'm now 17 and it happened 10 years ago. People still to this day ask me what happened, I like to explain it to them because the look on their face is like they are amazed about it.

Thank you,
Kasey

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Dog Bite:

I have a attached a photo of my left hand, bitten as I tried to separate my two boxers from fighting. I lost my pinkie fingernail and the bone was fractured. Could have been a lot worse so I guess I was lucky. Feel free to contact me for any info.

I’ll give you a little history on my clan.  I was home alone on  Monday evening with all 3 of my boxers, Bella 3yr old female, Bishop 2 1/2 yr old male and Brinks, their son who is now 13 months is already the largest of the 3 dogs weighing in at 68 lbs. I usually have no trouble with them but will admit they totally listen to my husband more than me.  Bishop is a small boxer at only 42 lbs and was trained by a local trainer in protection by Dogs RRR Us.  When I came home from work I directly went into the kitchen and put my purse etc away. I greeted Bella and Bish and at this point Bish was already carrying my shoe from the front hall. He does not chew them up but carries them around doing the boxer “kidney bean wiggle” for awhile.  I proceeded to our “dog room” where I crate Brinks during the day. I let him out and he followed me down the hallway. Right away he went up and smelled Bish with my shoe. I don’t know which one of them actually started to growl first but that’s when the fight started. They ended up in the kitchen still fighting and at which point the was blood everywhere. Brinks had Bish by the inside of his mouth and I thought I needed to do something. I started to drag brinks by his back legs closer to the door to the backyard and figured I could call Bish off. At this point Brinks did loosen his bite but then Bishop lunged at him and that’s when I got bit because my hands were still too close to Brinks. I wasn’t expecting Bishop not to listen but looking back on it should have been able to tell that they were both is such a drive that I shouldn’t have tried what I did. This happened on Monday and we have kept both dogs separated. When Bishop goes by the baby gates he looks like he wants to attack Brinkley.

I’m not sure if you time to answer a lot of personal e-mails but I am at a loss of what to do now. My husband had suggested we could find a home for Brinks but I still haven’t decided. We have been feeding them apart for months and are only given bones to chew on when they are separated. Brinkley became protective of his toys pretty young and had gone after Bishop before so I was aware this might happen and feel at fault.  I can take his toys, bones etc away from him with no problem and they are all very loving dogs but don’t know what the next step is. There is no children in the home yet but I do have small nieces who come by and think for now both dogs will have to be muzzled. Look forward to hearing back from you.

Thank you for your time,
Lauren  

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Ed's Response:

Thank you so much for sharing this. I hope photos like this will help convince people how dangerous dog fights can be

Kind Regards,
Ed


Dog Bite:

Guess I should've read your page first!

dog bite dog bite

Ed's Response:

Thanks for sending the dog bite photos. Can you tell me the details of what happen. Maybe the story will help others.

Kind Regards,
Ed

More:

Hi, Ed.

The new pictures are my wife's hand, resulting from the same incident.  These pictures are 10 days old and don't look as bad as they really were.  The picture of the top of the hand is the healing of a fingernail that was entirely torn off. The other one isn't very descriptive but, portrays the swelling (less now) from the crushed bone in the tip of the finger. Due to that bone, the injury bled for nearly 36 hours. I tried to send X-rays but they didn't work too well.

Our incident revolves around 2 adult female dogs, a weimaraner (107 lbs) and a husky mix (48 lbs). They are the youngest and oldest, respectively, of 4 and the shortest and longest time with us, respectively. They have issues.

The older dog has always had problems with strange dogs and, because she lives in a fenced yard, snaps at our other dogs, by proxy. The 2 others blow it off and walk away.  We got the weimie a year ago and, while they get along for the most part, the weimie thinks the husky is seriously trying to fight. 

We've had 1 fight over a dog coming up to the fence.  The fight which caused the pictured injuries happened when the weimie approached the husky's bowl. She likes to eat outside in her kennel and she doesn't like to be bothered.  We can't let them kill each other so we tried to break it up.  It took 15 minutes or more to break them up and resulted in 2 hours in emergency.

Thanks for your interest and web page.  Hope this helps someone else to not do the same thing.  It sure helped us to see your article.

Scott

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Dog Bite:

Hello,

I don't know if you still want dog bite photos but here they are.  I got my GSD at the tender age of 6 months.  She had been passed around twice in that short life.  This bite was totally my fault and will be the first to admit it. She was wild as can be when I first got her, and she was my first big dog.  I should have thought twice and done research but all I saw was a gorgeous girl that needed a stable home.  Anyway, I already have two yorkies, male and female.  They didn't like her but they warmed up to her and sort of started playing.  After watching your DVD Dealing the with Dominant and Aggressive Dog, I took control of the situation.  I put her on a leash inside the house and began showing her who was boss.  Long story short she went for my male yorkie as soon as I established myself as the alpha.  Before when she thought she was the alpha they got along just fine.  Thankfully I had her on the leash in the house when my male walked towards us.  I didn't think anything of it since they were ok together previously.  It happened pretty fast so I'm not sure why I knew what was about to happen but something about her stance told me to pull up on her leash, (he was pretty short so pulling up kept him out of her reach).  He escaped unscathed, he was gone in just a second.  As soon as he was gone I assumed it was over so I lowered her back to the ground.  As soon as her paws touched the floor she latched onto the side of my knee which was level with her head so I guess it is the first thing she saw.  We went to the ground and she started to jerk on my knee so I started choking her to get her to stop, I guess she came out of the attack mode she was in and let go.  Had I had the dominant dog collar, that I now have, this probably wouldn't have happened.  Or if I had handled things differently it wouldn't have happened.  Since that day, they have been completely separated.  If they are out, she is crated and the other way around.  They are happy and safe now thanks to advice on your forum from smarter people than myself ha ha.  My GSD wouldn't dream of pulling this now.  She still will never be allowed around small dogs, or small children because of her prey drive and my own paranoia.  Thanks for all the DVDs and the forum. 

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dog bite dog bite

Dog Bite:

This happened when a friends pit bull started a fight with my lab. The dogs had been together in the same house for almost 2 years and neither had shown any type of aggression towards each other. I don't know what the fight started over, and neither dog was hurt in the fight... I was the unlucky one.

Laurie

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The night it happened

and one week later...

More from Laurie:

Thank you. I never realized that dogs that had been around each other for years and never shown any aggression would fight. After I got bitten, I was very uncomfortable having the pit bull remain in my home since he was the aggressor, and the one that bit me.  I had my friend come an get him and I am happy to say that now he is an only dog, and I'm sure much happier. My 3 dogs have a pack order, with all the humans being first, and then the dogs... it is funny, their order is when we got them. The lab is the highest in the dog chain, then the shep. mix, then the lab mix.  None of them have ever fought each other, and its weird, they don't even try to take toys away from each other. I have read your articles about having multiple dogs in the house, and they are no longer fed in the same area. Even though they have never been aggressive over food, I don't want to take that chance. I'm hoping that even though my lab was "involved" in the fight that since he wasn't bitten or injured at all that he will not be aggressive to other dogs.


Dog Bite:

We're not sure which dog it was that got me - my dog was attacked by my neighbor's dog suddenly, and when I tried to grab my dog (a Chow Chow), my face got in the way. It's all kind of a blur, really, and VERY scary, because my contact lens got knocked out of my eye, so at first I thought my left eye had gotten injured!! Thankfully it just missed, as you can see by the scratches right below the eye.

I have definitely learned that the most important thing to do is STAY CALM, and not bother screaming and yelling, and having two people to break up the fight is the way to go.

- Kait

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Dog Bite:

These are pictures of what happens when someone uses a shock collar that doesn't have a clue about dog behavior, owns a pit bull and drinks.

I rode my bike up my neighbors driveway and his pit came out to great me as normal, relaxed, whole body wagging.  I stopped my bike and reached down, palm up, to return the greeting and my neighbor shocked his dog on high level.  The dog yelped and bite me.  It was a reflex from the stim and not an "attack".  I went one way off the bike, away from the dog, the dog stayed where he was, looking as stunned as I felt. 

What did I learn from this: Don't drink and pretend you are a dog trainer. 

The dog was about 10 months old at the time of the bite.  The owner has made him an neurotic mess that is not trustable in any situation.  Owning an e-collar doesn't mean you know how to use it.

Another note, the doctor decided to glue this wound closed, and as an added bonus he neglected to clean it first.  4 days later, I was in my doctors office having the glue pealed off and I was put on mega antibiotics for infection.  The middle bone in my finger was fractured and if the infection would have gone in to the bone I would have been in serious trouble. 

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6-24-2006 07-01-2006

Ed's Response:

Thank you for sending this – I am sure it will be helpful to others to realize just how serious dog bites can be. I hope you are better.

Regards,
Ed Frawley

Another Dog Bite Photo:

Ed, Yes, I am fine now, all the feeling is back in my finger and all is well. 

This is my last bite picture.  I have been lucky.

Below is another bite, and this one is from one of my dogs.  I hunt and compete Jack Russells.  I do a lot of cardio training with them running with a quad, lure coursing here at home, etc, to keep them in top shape for what I require them to do.  The one problem I had was with the quad.  They would get so excited and then frustrated that the quad wasn't moving yet that they started biting. The quad tires, sticks, me.  I realized that they were overflowing drive and I had to get a handle on it, cause damn it, that hurt.  Now, I make them get control of themselves by sitting before I open the kennel door.  I wore chaps for a while and when they would go for the tires or me, I would stop, say no, and not start again until they backed off.  It didn't take the smart little buggers long to figure it out and now I can leave the chaps behind.   

dog bite


Dog Bite:

Hello,

I read that you wanted dog bite pictures for your web site. I have one for you.
 
Two friends of mine bought themselves a pit bull mix,a rescue. The next day the dog,for no reason I could see, jumped up, grabbed the owners friends arm and refused to release it (the guy sat on a stone, with is back from the dog). None of the other people there could move, I told the dog to let go, kicked him hard in the head with my working shoes, with no effect at all. Everything seemed to be in slow motion, we had no one to help us, nothing that we could use to get the dog off.

As I thought that, pure panic, my dog, a 7 year old american stafford shire terrier came. He had been swimming and we had watched him when the attack happened. My dog came running forward with intent to attack the pit bull mix to save the guy. Sacrificing himself. The attacking dog let go to face my dog and we got a hold of its leash.

The pit bull mix was put down the same day. It did not show any sign of attacking before, he had been a friendly tail wagging dog, and after the attack it acted like nothing had happened. No stress, nothing. Totally unpredictable. Now not all pit bull mixes are like that, but I never thought I would witness a dog attack on a human for real in my life.

The guy's injuries were bad. His muscle hanged outside the skin had to be put in place again and he needed 25 stitches. If my dog hadn't come to the rescue it could have been a lot worse. I realize this when I see the horrific pictures.

My dog has been nominated hero dog year 2009 in my country.

Regards,
Helena

Dog Bite


Dog Bites:

Hello there,

I am writing for the second time. I sent you a picture already of what happened to my left arm when I tried to stop my female pit by wrapping my arm around her neck/shoulder area before the fight started. That time I only had two punctures and bruises. I see you put the picture up on your second page. After reading your article, I didn't know if I had the strength to stop a dog fight, but I swore to myself I was going to use your method should I ever have the need. Unfortunately, I never really received the chance.

It was New Year's Day (2009) and about 5 of us (family, friends) were signing karaoke. China (6 year old female pit) was sitting next to me on the couch... which, after reading a lot of articles and books, I know now is not good when you have a dog with a dominant personality. Well, she is very skittish too and someone knocked over something in the hallway outside of the room. Sadly, Pudge (12 year old male pit/lab mix) came into the room to investigate and came right up to China. She immediately took after his face and got a hold of his ear area. There was nothing I could do. I was prone and the two dogs were practically in my lap. The men in the room absolutely freaked (having no experience for this situation) and made it so much worse. They started yelling and tried to pull the two dogs apart by grabbing their middles. Well, they succeeded but China was in such a frenzy that her head whipped around and -- bam! There was my (left, again!) arm in her mouth.

She crunched down and I remember just staring down at her and my arm in disbelief. I didn't even yell or anything -- just stared down at her. My husband grabbed her once he realized what was going on and she jerked her head like she was going to start thrashing. I screamed out, "No! Leave her alone." He did and then China realized she had a hold of me and not the other dog. She instantly let go upon the realization and took off in a run to another room.

The end result: 5 puncture wounds, one very large deep gash, a minor gash and cuts, $3000 in medical bills, 2 1/2 month healing time and I have no feeling in the top of my thumb to this day, but plenty of nasty scars.

I was told that if one puncture wound was deeper or more to the right side of my arm, I would've had to have surgery to repair the tendon because at first I couldn't use my thumb at all and I couldn't turn my arm over.

I am writing this because I think it's important for people to know that in the right situation (like two dogs fighting in front of you on a couch), you can get bit no matter your knowledge. I also want people to know that their dog is not the same during or seconds after a fight. China is not aggressive toward people at all. She is only dog aggressive and bit me because she was so hyped up. Thirdly, it's important for a person to know their dog. In my case, China is skittish and the reduction of loud noises and commotion has done wonders, but in order to achieve that, I had to give her away to a friend who knows her history very well. My friend is currently working with a vet to desensitize China. So my very last point is... Sometimes, you and the animal are not meant to be. You can't have your dogs keep fighting, and especially not when you have other dogs that are far too old or simply unable to defend themselves properly.

I am really, really hoping that I will never have to send you another email. Thank you for your wonderful site and advice. When I decide it's time for my family to bring another dog into our lives, I know the first place I am going to be getting information from is your site since you have such wonderful articles.

--- Amy

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Dog Bite

Ed's Response:

Thanks much for this email – I agree it will help others realize how seriously it is.
You may want to read the article I wrote on how to break up a dog fight without getting hurt. It is also in the form of a free eBook on my web site.

I would recommend the following DVDs to stop this from happing again:

Preparing Your Dog for the Helper
Establishing Pack Structure with the Family Dog

I am afraid if you don’t make some changes your going to have more fights.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

Hi,

I found your web site. and saw that you need pictures of dog bites. I tried to break up a fight between my dog and my neighbor’s dogs, both whom I trust, but I still got bit…by my own dog. I got about 4 stitches in my left inner-elbow. It’s a big scar now.

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dog bite dog bite

Dog Bite:

I was one of the stupid ones who got caught up in the moment when my two dogs started to fight again. One is a Border Collie/Wolf Mix and the other is a Malamute. My first instinct is to protect them from each other, so when the Malamute lunged at the Border Collie. I did the classic grabbing her by her collar. Then the Border Collie lunged back at the Malamute, so I grabbed her and pulled her up on the couch with me. But of course the Malamute wasn't done, so she lunged yet again and instead of getting the Border Collie, she got my arm. My cousin was home at the time even, but she didn't get to either in time. I had been told of the method of grabbing their hind legs even, but had stupidly forgotten.

The pictures are of my forearm. The one with the single bite is underneath and the other bigger one is the top of my forearm.

Dog Bite Dog Bite

Dog Bites:

Bites to wrists and forearms, broken bone in left hand and partially amputated middle fingertip of right hand (bone splintered, unsavable) and pin in fractured ring ringer next to it. I spent days in hospital for IV antibiotics and excruciating surgery with only local anesthetic (do not advise this but had no other option). As you noted, bite wounds are only loosely stitched, if at all, to help prevent infection. Deep tissue damage under the scarring is inevitable, and painful, months after.

This was the result of trying to break up two spayed female English Bull Terriers, one 8 years, the other 14 months a month ago. I knew how to safely break up a fight, but not all by myself. Obviously.

A rapid succession of unexpected young female fosters unbalanced our pack order. I immediately sought professional help from a noted behaviorist/trainer to correct the situation and strengthen my leadership skills. She reiterated exactly what you said--"NEVER touch a fighting dog, as it causes them to turn on you!" I sought professional in-person evaluation to determine if it was possible they could safely live together in the future, and if so, what must be done.

All my dogs are undergoing further training under professional guidance and thankfully, order has been restored. I am fortunate the outcome was not worse and that Animal Control knew my dogs personally: that they were not vicious, people-aggressive, or even aggressive with each other or other dogs prior to this incident. My other dog, a small pit-mix, sustained a bite to her foot while trying to help me break it up. Their wounds were far less than mine and all have recovered.

My dogs are separated when home alone before this and always will be.
But no more fosters--my first duty is to keeping my pack running smoothly and being a strong leader EVERY day. I volunteer in other ways now.

Thanks for your important safety message. Wish I'd known it before.
This photo is not as graphic as some; a month later the 20+ stitches are out and the swelling reduced enough to allow me to type. Just waiting for bones to heal so can start therapy and finally work again.

CW

Dog Bite


Dog Bite:

I was attacked by a neighbor's pit bull. It was about 7:40 in the morning on November 7th when I was walking down the road and taking my son to preschool. I noticed that the neighbor's dog, that had mildly bit my son's forearm in April, was loose. So, I quickly picked him up off his bike and stood still. Then I noticed the dog running towards us, so I turned sideways so my son would not get bit again. The dog jumped up and bit my elbow and shook his head until I fell to the ground. Then he let go and just paced back and forth in front of us. I slowly backed up to another neighbor's door where she called animal control and the ambulance. I was transported to the hospital and had to have major reconstructive surgery to fix my arm. I still have a very distinctive scar most of the way around my arm, but luckily I have full movement. It was the worst dog bite that the animal control in our town had seen. The dog was kept tied up in the woods with little contact by the people's house, so when ever he got loose he would go crazy. If there is anything else you would like to know, just let me know. Thanks.

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Dog Bite Dog Bite

Ed's Response:

What happened to these people? And the dog?

I hope you sued the hell out of them.

Ed Frawley

Reply:

Well, after my son was bit in April, the people got a few citations and the dog was quarantined for 10 days to their garage. They then had to get a better collar since they considered his incident minor, but since mine was considered major, the dog was put to sleep and they received more citations. Yes, we did sue them since it was the second time it happened.


Comment:

If a dog respects the adults of the house as the leaders, why wouldn't they also respect the babies of the leaders in a similar way that wolves and other pack living canids respect the offspring of the pack leaders? I have been around big dogs my entire childhood and I never ever knew a kid that got bit on the face, and in fact, with humans teaching children how to relate to dogs and how  and when to behave towards dogs, we never in my entire childhood had any serious incident with a dog that I can recall, and this in a town full of families of kids and many dogs of all types.

I personally believe no normal dog will maul a human being which it knows, and that any dog that would seriously harm a person on the face is probably a vicious dog which has something wrong with it as far as it's socialization. Of course, I am not an expert. Also, my mother used to housebreak puppies for her friends, and I watched her housebreak golden retrievers and german shepherd pups in literally a few days - as soon as the dog could control it's bowels, it would, and these dogs were not ever punished. Housebreaking a dog, if you consider it a challenging aspect of dog training, well, I don't know what you are talking about. Mike.

Ed's Response:

Mike,

You are so wrong your don’t even know how much you don’t know.

Have a look at this web page. http://leerburg.com/dogbite.htm These are all examples of how stupid your email is.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

I am a volunteer for a rescue, in San Diego, CA.

I had walked this dog many many times, no issues or problems.

I was at an adoption event, and noticed some white "things" (for a better word), on his rear.  So I took him to the one person (his person) that I knew would let him examine him.

We laid him down, and I showed her what I was worried about.  She explained it was baby wipe remains from her trying to clean him up.

I was on one knee at the time, and he jumped up and nipped at my face, getting a little beard in his mouth.

I grabbed his leash and held him away from my face, and he turned his head, bit me lightly at first, then gradually increased the pressure.

8 stitches later...

Art

Dog bite dog bite
dog bite dog bite

Ed's Response:

Laying a dog down on it’s side – which is basically an “ALPHA ROLL” is a very, very dangerous thing to do. I know a women who got 100 stitches in her face when she tried to ALPHA ROLL an adult German Shepherd.

Unfortunately we see this a lot on TV shows like Cesar Milan. While Cesar has the experience to ALPHA ROLL a dog and get away with it virtually 99.9999% of those who view the show should never try it. There are much safer and better ways to deal with dogs.

I guarantee that this dog gave off signals that it had the potential to bite. Many times these are very subtle signals that are easy for those without experience to miss, which is what happened here. That’s not uncommon and I don’t say this to be critical. It’s just a simple fact. I am sure you will not make this mistake again and I thank you for sending in your story. It will help others realize how dangerous an ALPHA ROLL can be.


Dog Bite:

Hi Mr. Frawley,
 
Attached are some pictures of some minor injuries that have happened to me trying to stop my dogs from fighting. I have two male dogs that go at it a lot. One is a rottweiler mix and the other is American bulldog/pit-bull.
 
My fiance recently tried to stop a fight and grabbed their back legs with a friend but the dogs did not let go of each other. The fights have gotten so bad that they just latch on and do not let go. We love them both so much. We wish not to have to give one away. Is there something we can do to prevent them from fighting? When they do fight, how can we separate them from fighting if they do not let go?
 
I am hoping you may have some advice to give. I am in dyer need of help. I hoped that they would have learned to get a long by now, since this has been going on for about a year now, but it looks like it has gotten worse.
 
Look forward to hearing from you!
 
Thanks for your help :)
 
Pamela

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Dog Bite:

Hello,

I ran across your website looking for pictures of dog bites. So I am sending pictures of my arm. This happened Nov. 4, 2009. I was visiting a friend of mine. As I was leaving her house when I got to my car, her dog (Spike) attacked me 3 or 4 times. It was terrifying. I thought I was going to lose my arm. The dog is a mix breed, part chow and weighs 55 or 60 pounds. Thank god I had on a thick sweat shirt or the injuries would have been much worse. The trauma was so traumatic I have to see a therapist. I hope these pictures are helpful to you. Thank you.

Phyllis
Newport, TN

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Dog Bite  

Dog Bite:

I got bit by a Great Dane while trying to break up a fight between the Dane and another dog.  I took this photo of my hand with my cell phone while in the ER.

Elizabeth

dog bite


Dog Bite:

Hi,

I have 6 dogs that do not always get along.  In my attempt to break up a fight between 2 Shibas, my 4 year lab came to my rescue and pulled me out of danger.  I ended up with over 80 stitches from my ankle to my butt.

That picture should make people take notice.

Thanks,
Marge

dog bite

Ed's Response:

Thanks for sending this. Can you provide a little more detail on what you tried to do and how the dogs came to bite you? Did you have their collar or how did this happen?

I do think it would help people.

Regards,
Ed Frawley

The Story:

I have 6 dogs (8 year old  F cockier spaniel (THE BOSS),  a 5 year old M black lab avoids conflict at all costs, 3.5 year old F Shiba, 2.5 year old F Shiba and last but not least 2 -2.5 year old M Shibas.

The 2 male Shibas cannot be within sight of each other. They will fight to kill (Teddy is 22 lbs and Joey is 35 lbs). They each have bedrooms with cages in them as they will try and go through a regular door.

Joey was at the door to Teddy's room and Teddy was not secured in his cage. I took my tennis rackets and wedged them between Joey and the door. Once I got him back he turned on the other dogs. I jumped on him and covered him with myself.  I was bit from the butt all the way down my leg, little bites though. I put Joe in his cage and tried to calm the situation. I called my sister and she left work and came over, when the remaining "shibas" heard her in the garage they started to fight. At that point I grabbed a comforter to try and cover them and split them up.  At that time Scout (110 lb lab) grabs my leg pulling me away from them. This is where the severe bites occurred. The ironic thing is he is my dog with me everywhere I go and he tore my leg up. The paramedics came and scooped up the innards of my leg wrapped it and so on.

I know I am insane, I still have all 6 dogs. I have attached several pictures of the wounds.

The Shibas are the only ones with collars.

If you would like any other info please let me know.  Also any recommendations, other than putting me in a nut house.

Sincerely,
Marge

Dog Bite Dog Bite
Dog Bite  

 


Dog Bite:

A stray dog ran up to me and my dogs while on a walk. I am 9 months pregnant and my dogs reacted in a protective manner. They have never been in a fight in the 4 years I have had them. Silly me tried to break it up. Luckily it was my own dog that accidentally bit me and he instantly stopped the fighting.

Dog Bite

Cindy's Response:

I'm sorry that you were bitten, but your dogs getting in a fight almost certainly had nothing to do with you being pregnant. This is one of those myths that gets passed around, there is no truth to it.  It probably had more to do with the fact that you didn't offer them leadership and guidance about what to do when faced with this stray dog. 

Ed has written an article about being attacked by stray dogs.

We also have an article about how to break up a dog fight without being hurt.

I hope your wound heals up quickly,

Cindy


Dog Bite:

I had two dogs That both were not neutered. I had Grizz, a 15 pound Shiba Inu since he was 3 months old. When Grizz was 3 years old I introduced him to a new puppy who was never quite right (I thought he was abused). We named the new puppy Alamosa. I also had 3 other dogs that were all Shiba Inus, but they were neutered or females. As Alamosa got older he challenged Grizz. They were trying to establish who was alpha. I broke up one fight that was not that bad. I had a pretty good bite on my arm and finger. I kept the dogs separate till I could get the dogs fixed. On July 4th the little Shiba Inu, Grizz got out of the room. He started to run to the back door, Alamosa thought he was coming after him. He picked Grizz up by the neck and started swinging him in circles. I panicked and didn't know what to do. My 50 pound dog was going to kill my 15 pound dog.. At first I picked Alamosa up and he dropped Grizz, but then Grizz jumped and was biting Alamosa I lost balance and fell. Then Alamosa again had Grizz by the neck.. I had Alamosa in a head lock and my hand in his mouth to keep him from biting all the way down on the little dog. I was hitting Alamosa in the head to get him to release, but he only fought harder. I also tried to pry his jaw open but it would not budge. I ended up pulling the little dog from Alamosa's mouth and throwing him out the front door. Alamosa did not try and go after the other dogs nor did they try and interfere. Alamosa did not have a scratch on him. My other dog was covered in blood. I thought it was his blood. I did not even know I was bleeding until I got to my parents house and realized my meat was hanging out of my arm. My dad drove Grizz to the Emergency Vet. Grizz had a superficial wound while I had to get five stitches. It would have been more if they stitch all dog wounds. Not only did I have a good 60 bite marks on my arms and hands but I also got bit on my foot and ribs. 

I had Grizz stay at my parents and Alamosa with me. I got both dogs neutered thinking this would solve the issue. I moved and my friend took Mosa. They had him 4 months. I went to check on Alamosa and he was starved and who knows what else. He was always a shy dog and was never social (even though he was always around people). I took Alamosa back and continued to keep him away from Grizz cause they would still challenge each other through the glass door. Then yesterday Alamosa was in the back yard and Grizz managed to get out. Alamosa went straight after Grizz. My mom had Alamosa by the hind quarters trying to pick him up. He would not release Grizz. I tried to pry his jaw open and it didn't work. I then put a metal stick in the back of Alamosa's jaw. He bit it in half. I had to hit Alamosa with a 2 by 4 for him to let go. We separated the dogs and they were both fine. They bit through one of my moms nails, and I have 5 small bites on my fingers. Now I feel I have to put Alamosa to sleep. I have tried to get him used to other people but it doesn't work. He growls and snaps at everyone. Even people he once knew. It is hard cause he is a GREAT dog, but only with me. He knows tons of tricks and is obedient with me. I can't trust him with other people or animals and can't take the risk of him hurting anyone or anything else.   

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Dog Bite Dog Bite

2 Weeks After

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Dog Bite  

Ed's Response:

Many people (vets included) feel that neutering an adult dog will change its dog aggression. They are 100% wrong. This is born out by the fact that a lot of very good police service dogs come from working dog breeders and are only sold because they have one testicle. These dogs are neutered after they are 2 years old and do not lose any aggression.

The only way neutering has any effect on aggression is if it is done around 6 months old.

In your case the safest way to manage dogs like this is with TWO DOG CRATES. One dog will always have to be in his crate when the other is out. Locking them in separate rooms is too dangerous. It’s too easy for one to slip by when you or someone else opens the door – but then you already found that out the hard way.

Your dog that growls and snaps at people needs to learn that this is inappropriate behavior. You can counter condition the dog through the use of markers and jack potting high value treats every time a new person is around. This gets done to the point where a new person means good treats for the dog. Of course no on touches this dog – or looks at the dog or talks to the dog.  This work can be practiced on your walks where the dog encounters other people.

If this approach doesn’t work then you will need to work with our dominant dog collar.When the dog shows inappropriate aggression his front feet are lifted off the ground and he is told to “KOCK IT OFF.” This is explained in detail in my DVD titled Dealing with Dominant & Aggressive Dogs.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Fight:

Hello my name is Duna,

My dog Mylie, who is a German Shepherd, was playing in her backyard with my friends dog, Malibu, who is a Bit Mix. They got excited and my dog being a puppy went for Malibu's neck and Malibu started  attacking my dog. I grabbed the dogs by the collars and Malibu bit my forearm. I just read and watched your video, now I know how to brake dog fights apart and I will never try this by myself again! The dogs are fine, I got the worst of it! I thought I would share my Bite picture with you! Thank you for all you do!

Duna

Dog Bite


Dog Bite:

On 03/02/1984 I was 6 years old when the neighbor’s dog bit me. I was in the owner’s house, watching TV, the dog was sitting in front of me, I kind of had to look around the dog to see the cartoons. My name was mentioned in a conversation between Neighbor and my mom so I turned my head to look at them. That was when the dog jumped at me.

In picture 1 you can see how I couldn’t close my eye all the way—this was because my eyelid had been torn off and was hanging next to my nose.  After being re-attached, it was a little too short. Pictures 2 and 3 were me sitting on the couch at home after coming home from the hospital. Picture 4 is after the stitches were removed from the tear in my face; puncture wounds all healed pretty well. Picture 5 depicts a better-healed scar.

I had plastic surgery twice to remove the scar, my eyelid is still a little different than the other one—not noticeable to the average person but very aggravating to anyone putting make-up on me! The physical scar under my eye has been totally removed but it was very painful and frightening as I was still rather young when the surgeries occurred and when they do surgery right under your eye, they can’t allow you to be put under as they need your eye to stay open... scary to say the least.

The emotional trauma was enormous. The taunting from other children about my messed-up face, cruel and painful. The subsequent surgeries were terrorizing. 

This dog had bitten another child in the neighborhood not too long before me, in the face as well. The owners said it wouldn’t happen again and the dog was allowed to live. Then, my mom and I went over to Neighbor’s house for a visit, they talked while I watched TV.

Dyani-Alexandra
Dog-weary mother of 2 girls who aren’t even allowed to LOOK at a dog

Dog Bite Dog Bite
Dog Bite Dog Bite
Dog Bite  

Ed's Response:

Thank you for sending this. I will add it to the article I wrote on Kids and dogs. People need to see how important it is to control the environment their dogs are allowed to be in,

Too many are just stupid pet owners who live in denial of their dogs aggressive problems.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


A Forearm NOT a Knee:

This was within seconds of getting fight broken up and I had a jacket on when bitten. This looks like my knee cap it is the forearm below elbow.

bite


Dog Bite:

I was walking my dog, a 40 lb male. His leash slipped out of my hand and he ran over to a 70 lb husky male that was also on his walk. The lady walking the husky started screaming instantly -- before the dogs had even come near each other. They started sniffing -- and fighting as I ran over. The lady backs away, pulling on her leash, screaming. I was alone and tried to grab my dog's legs and kick his jaw off. He had a grip on the other dog's neck at that point. 

I told myself I wasn't going to put my hands in the middle of it and went to grab my dog's leash to attempt to pull him off since my other tactics weren't working. It was laying on the street and I grabbed it quickly. The husky was faster though -- and reached over and put his 2 canines into my forearm and quickly released. I yanked the leash for about 5 seconds and then they both released each other. 

The 2 punctures were on either side of my forearm -- and nearly connected in the center (very deep -- as his entire tooth went through each hole). The doc loosely put one stitch in either hole since they were gaping open -- but in a way that they would drain and breathe properly.

My male had been in a fight with a very territorial female 5 months before this. The female initiated when he got close to her. Since then -- if I'm not present to control the situation and correct him when he encounters other dogs -- he fights. It happened another time when he bolted out the front door that wasn't latched properly and started fighting with a male beagle about his size who was walking by the house. 

We have another dog -- a 65 lb female that he plays with great. She is very gentle and will ignore him and walk away if she doesn't want to play. Sometimes, however, if she has a bone he wants, he whines and is scared to go near her and retrieve it. (Makes me question his dominance).

I walk them daily -- they both walk by my side. I'm frustrated with the male's aggression in uncontrolled surprise encounters. If you have any tips or insight for me -- I would greatly appreciate it. I'm very inclined to take him to a trainer for professional help -- but money is tight.

In the house, and in situations where other dogs aren't present -- he is HIGHLY obedient. He knows if I don't approve of his behavior and rolls on his back in submission when I simply approach him and give him "the look." He has never shown any aggression towards humans. 

He is easily trainable and I try to be consistent and work with him often -- but still he fights with dogs in uncontrolled situations. I recently watched a chihuahua in our house for 2 weeks and he would sniff curiously -- but avoided him besides that. There are a pair of female St. Bernards that they meet with and they surround him and he shows no aggression towards. They are unleashed and my dogs are leashed. 

Thank you,
Take care,

Mollie

Dog bite dog bite
dog bite dog bite

Dog Bite:

Hello,

I recently stumbled upon your website, I see that you are always on the look out for pictures of bites, so here u go.

Well on 03/03/10 @ about 4:30 my son (7 years old) was playing outside with his friend like he always does. A neighbor let her dog outside while she checked the mail. Well my sons friend (7 year old boy) barked at the dog but then the dog came running and growling after them so the boys were scared and made a run for it but the dog was faster and jumped up and bite my son on his back. The lady heard him screaming so she turned and quickly got her dog and put him away, her dog is a Shepard/lab mix 2 1/2 year old by the way. The owner also said that he has never done this before and he always plays with kids and she didn't know what happened, she kind of blamed it on the other kid for barking... I blame it on her because where I live there is a leash law and she clearly didn't follow it... Luckily the bite was not too deep but it did get a little infected and we had to put him on stronger antibiotics,  but my son is a little messed up over it mentally.

My question is; Is it normal behavior for a so called friendly dog to do this? To me this is not normal and the dog should have never done this but I'm not an expert...

Thank you,
Gabby

Dog Bite Dog Bite
Dog Bite Dog Bite

Ed's Response:

I wrote an article on my website about preventing dog bits in children. While it doesn’t deal with this exact issue, every dog owner who has a dog around children may want to read it.

In your case there is a degree of responsibility that you need to accept with supervising your children and his friends. While I was not there, taunting a dog is not a smart thing to do. Your son paid the price for his friend's misbehavior.

So should this dog have done this? NO. Should the other boy have taunted the dog? NO.

In addition, turning and running probably triggered this dog to chase and bite. The odds are had the kids stood their ground and faced the dog he would have run up and barked. The owner would have heard this and come and got her dog under control. That may have been difficult for kids to do but had anyone ever told them how to deal with a dog they would have known to stand still with their hands crossed in front and tucked under their arms. If they get knocked down, they should lay on their stomach and cover their head with their arms and not scream.

The bottom line is almost all dog bites are preventable. In this case your son was lucky it was not worse. This neighbor should never have this dog off leash. Not ever and not for any reason.


Dog Fight:

My boyfriend and I took our Jack Russell/Pug to the dog park where he was in the pen with about eight other dogs and they were all doing fine. A large Pitt-bull/Terrier mix came into the pen with his owner and three children. It happened so fast--the attack, that my dog would have been killed if Chris, (my boyfriend) did not intervene. I know that Chris almost lost his thumb while saving my dog, but my dog, Tucker,  would have surely been dead if he hadn't. I think Chris was extremely lucky that he didn't lose his thumb or experience much more serious injuries as once the jaws lock it's impossible to get them open. I'm not sure why the dog let go but Chris pulled our dog, Tucker up off the ground by his harness and that's when he got bitten. The dog was trying to latch on to our dog again after Chris got him off the ground. I was reading your advice on the web about breaking up dog fights and in retrospect it all makes sense. However, what doesn't make sense is going to a dog park in the first place because you never know what type of dog you'll encounter. That was surely Tucker's last trip to a dog park and ours as well!!!

Below is a picture of our little dog, Tucker (22 lbs.) who was prey to the larger aggressor who had to weigh about 130 lbs. Big dogs and little dogs don't mix...

Best,
Kaydi

Let me know if you need to know anything else. As of now we aren't sure about the prognosis of Chris's thumb--nerve, tissue, ligament damage etc. as it just happened yesterday. They gave him about 8 stitches but now we are learning that you aren't supposed to stitch dog bites. However, since this went down to the bone--they had no choice.

Dog Bite
dog bite dog bite

Dog Fight:

Enclosed are two pictures: the first, is a bite I had from a pit-bull three summers ago. I was trying to keep my dogs away from an iron gate where the pit was, and made the mistake of giving the pit-bull my back! He grabbed my leg, but didn't tug nor pull (thank God). The moment I felt him clasp down, I ever so slightly, moved forward, that's what tore my leg! It had to be simultaneously, because as soon as i felt it, I turned and opened his mouth with my hands, he immediately let go!!! The second, is a picture of my dogs at "play!" This is not the first time that I've been bitten! I actually had an encounter with an Akita when I was 9 years old! He was biting into my scull for more than 30 minutes!! Not more than three months later, that same dog bit me again, this time on the face!! All together, I've had 85 stitches from dog bites!! Being the resilient male that I am, I'm truly a pack leader now and everyone who sees my dogs with me, can tell.

Jackson

Dog Bite Dogs

Ed's Response:

Not many emails of dog bite make me cringe anymore – yours did. You are a tough SOB.

Thanks for sending these photos. I will include them in my newsletter. Too many new dog trainers underestimate the potential for injury when handling dogs and dog fights. You learned this lesson the hard way. I believe your story will help others.

Regards,
Ed Frawley

More of the Story:

I thought that will get a cringe out of you! It was a big ordeal! the cops showed up before the ambulance did and they kept wanting me to show my leg to the new arrival of cops! They where just as astonished as you were! What made them freak out, was the fact that I was totally cool and calm! I was joking around flashing them my leg and laughing at their reactions! Needless to say that my adrenaline was off the charts!! I was just soooo happy that "hammer" the pit, let me go!! I was expecting the worse! I could have been really hurt, you know?  But like you said, I am a tough SOB!

Ed's Question:

Did you have to have surgery? How did they fix that – I can't imagine they just flushed it out and stitched it up???

How long was your recovery?

Regards,
Ed Frawley

Answer:

A plastic surgeon did stitch me up and flush it, but thank god it wasn't a long healing time. I was on crutches for three weeks and i even put out a fire at school, running on one leg to get the hose from the stairway!!! The scar healed up amazingly, I must say!


Dog Bite:

Dear Cindy,

In response to the request in your newsletter for pics of dog bites I am submitting attached. My friend was playing with a very friendly springer spaniel. There was no aggression involved. My friend was holding the tug incorrectly and as the dog lunged to grab it, he pulled it away, at an awkward angle. She inadvertently bit him. The damage took less than a moment to happen. The dog let go immediately she realized the thing in her mouth was not the toy, but all too late. In all of the relevant videos, Ed and Michael stress the correct positioning of toys / tugs. It is extremely important that people realize this advice stems from years of experience and can save them a lot of pain. My friend was very, very lucky, as he is a diabetic and elderly (80 years). It was not easy to find a doctor who was willing to put the stitches in. The wound was sutured the following day and healed uneventfully. If complications had set in, it was not impossible to believe he could have ended up losing his hand.

Thanks for the great newsletter. We appreciate the work you guys put into it!
Kind regards
SAM

dog bite dog bite
dog bite dog bite

Cindy's Response:

Thanks for sending this Sam, I'm glad your friend healed up without issue. You are right about the presentation of toys. This is extremely important! The dog also needs to learn proper targeting technique.

These skills can be learned in The Power of Playing Tug with Your Dog.


Dog Bite:

Hey Cindy,
 
This is what happens when you work a dog civilly and get too close. The handler did not realize that it was a live bite right away for it was dark out. After the out I put my sleeve back on, not knowing the extent of the damage and obviously in shock, I continued the work until my friends stopped me and brought me to the hospital.

Matt

Dog Bite Dog Bite on the arm

Ed's Response:

Thank you for sending your photos.

Some of my staff think I should not put these dog bite photos in our newsletter. I disagree. The reason they belong there is because the vast majority of people don’t understand how seriously a person can be injured when mistakes happen around dogs. Working around dominant dogs, aggressive dogs or training dogs in handler protection is serious business. It not only requires training it requires the person to know their limitation. People need to be willing to walk away from a situation they don’t have the experience or training to handle.

When people do protection training with dogs they need to be aware of how dangerous it is and how easily something can go wrong. Too often small simple mistakes can lead to serious accidents. Last week a good friend of mine (a 20 year police K9 handler) was accidentally bit during normal police training. He got a full mouth bite in the leg that resulted in 4 deep puncture wounds and some serious bruising.

The moral of this story is that new trainers should only try this work under the direct supervision  of a trained professional and the minute people start to cut corners on safety is when something happens. I would bet you a lot of money you won't be making the same mistake again. I hope your wounds heal.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

Hello,

I was wondering if you could point me in the right direction for some material in training my dog not to bite. We have a 7 month old male shitzu/ Yorkie mix that is showing signs of aggression towards my 6 year old son. He has bit my son twice to the point of drawing blood. We had a trainer come out and work with the two of them to try and repair the bond. It seemed she worked more with training my son than with the dog. She taught my son not to stare him in the eye and not to be ground level with the dog and to stand tall. The first time he bit my son was a couple of months ago. I was holding him and my son reached in to pet him and he bit his hand puncturing it and drawing blood. Last night he bit my son again in the face. He took one of my son’s toys and when he reached down to get it the dog lunged at my son’s face growling and snarling and bit him and held on until I swatted him. Luckily he only weighs about 6lbs and didn’t do much damage… I have been researching Yorkie pet rescues today for placement. But I am wondering if he is fixable at this point and can be trained to be a loving dog with my son. He is fine with myself, my husband and our 9 year old daughter. He is currently being crate trained. And when out of the crate we keep him on the leash in the house at our sides while the kids are home until he can be trusted. He bit my son yesterday while on the leash. We planned on having him neutered this month. I’d hate to give him away if there is some hope for him but then again I would never forgive myself if he seriously injured my son or another child for that matter. Any help you could give me would be greatly appreciated.

Mary

Dog Bite

Ed's Response:

Mary,

Most self described professional trainers don’t understand dog aggression and dominance. I can’t tell you how often I get emails like yours.

The fact is this dog is the way he is because of how you have lived with him. I don’t mean this in a negative way – most people just don’t understand how important this is with SOME (not all) dogs. Yours happens to be the kind of temperament that needs very specific rules and it needs to understand the consequences of not following the rules. It’s no different than raising a child.

You need to change the way you live with your dog. Run it through a pack structure program – this is details in the DVD I produced titled Establishing Pack Structure with the Family Dog.

You should also get the DVD titled Dealing with Dominant and Aggressive Dogs. I would also have this dog wear a dominant dog collar when on leash - how to use it is explained in the dominant dog DVD and on my web site.

This can be fixed if you make the decision to educate yourself and your family.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

Hi,

Here are photos of some dog bites I received when attacked by a new neighbor's Akita dog. I had not met it before and it got out accidentally when the owners were having an argument. It came up to me growling when I was on the sidewalk talking to another neighbor. I turned and walked away and my husband yelled out my name. When I looked back the dog had lunged and was off the ground with its head level with mine. It knocked me down in front of my house and I rolled from side to side to protect my neck. If my husband had not got him off me I think I would have been killed. He weighed over 100lbs.

Maree

Ed's Response:

Holy crap, this looks terrible! Thank you for sending it. I am sure it will help others understand how dangerous dogs can be.

What was the end  of the story? What happened to the dog and the neighbors? Did they pay for this?

Regards,
Ed Frawley

More of the Story:

The owners thought that I must have done something to their dog! They were sure of this even though they admitted to the neighbor who witnessed the attack (and who had nightmares for months), that the dog had bitten the woman owner too. Of course it was not the all out attack he launched on me. 

The local dog warden wanted the owners to put the dog down but they refused. He said his hands were tied because the county was in the middle of a state court battle appealing their vicious dog ordinances. He couldn't even force them to put a muzzle on the dog which would have helped me feel better. He suggested I seek legal advice.

The owners kept the dog locked in their upstairs apartment most of the time, (which I thought was not fair for a big dog), and I think they walked him in the middle of the night. They also fixed their backyard fence and would exercise him in the yard with them staying with him. Sometimes the dog would be on their front balcony and he would growl at visitors to the neighbor who lived next door to them. The owners thought it was funny when the neighbor expressed concern that the dog may jump off the balcony and attack them!

I realized I had become afraid of large dogs and stopped walking in our neighborhood. My husband's health insurance included some free counseling so I visited with a counselor who recommended I carry mace. The warden told me that could be dangerous for me but to carry pepper spray instead. 

I was attending university at the time and decided to speak to the student legal aid office to see if there was anything that could be done about the dog. I was upset at the owner's attitude. It was obvious they didn't really think their dog was dangerous even though they saw me covered in blood after the attack. They were sure I had provoked their dog and refusing to admit it! The legal aid office wrote a letter to the dog owners and also to the landlord enquiring about their insurance. They contacted the rental insurance company to see if they would do anything about my expenses and pain and suffering.

The thing is I didn't really have any expenses because the health insurance paid for my visit to the hospital emergency room. Luckily the dog had had a rabies shot. The owners brought a copy of the paperwork to the hospital while I was being treated. I was told money for pain and suffering is based on a formula related to my costs. I didn't really have any costs though and then I was due to graduate and also leave the state. One of the reasons we moved actually is that I no longer felt safe in the neighborhood.

I am still working on being less terrified of big dogs. Anyway to cut a long story short the owners kept the dog and I received $5,500 in compensation after the hospital had been paid back. Now I wonder if I should have held out for more. Being afraid of dogs has really limited my quality of life. It is so annoying.

Thank you for what you do with dogs. I came across your website by accident and now will have a lot better idea of whether a dog owner is in control of his pack or not. I also now know not to look a dog in the eye (it was a bit difficult not to when he was level with my crotch and growling), or to turn my back and walk away. Thanks for listening. It has been nice to unload. I usually don't talk about it because I think people don't really understand the terror I felt during the attack.

After my husband got the dog off me I looked up to see the dog starting to circle me. Luckily his owners then appeared and called him away. I hated feeling so helpless and don't think I could have been as brave as my husband if it had been him who had been attacked instead of me. The warden wondered if there was domestic violence in the dog's home and that he was stressed and attacked me because I was a woman. I had a feeling I should not have walked away from the situation, but I was so scared, and I was walking away from the dog's home, not towards it. I cannot believe the dog's owners could be so irresponsible. They obviously do not think their dog is aggressive, which is amazing to me. I hope the photos help someone else too.

Maree


Dog Bite:

If only we'd read your article BEFORE this happened. Only 4 stitches. No permanent injury. GSD vs rescue mutt. Tried to intervene on behalf of rescue.

Ed's Response:

Thank you for sending this. When you have a minute could you write the details of how the fight started and what you tried to do that resulted in the dog bite? I am sure your story will help others.

Regards,
Ed Frawley

The Story:

We're not really sure how the fight started. I was on my computer and heard them get into it. By the time I turned around the 41 lb mixed breed rescue was down and the GSD had him by the fur around his throat. My husband came running out of the bedroom and straddled the GSD, grabbed him by the collar and yelled OUS a million times. Then I threw a couple of glasses of water in his face. Hit him with a stick. Nothing worked. He was NOT letting go. That's when my husband asked me to try to pull the rescue (Karl) away from the GSD. Karl turned his heard toward me and I got it in the hand. 4 stitches and possible a fractured knuckle. I know he was just trying to protect himself. It was my fault. But yeah, dog fights are scary and it's almost impossible to watch one dog you love try to kill (it least it seemed that way) another dog you love. Thank you so much for your article, we will know how to handle it if (when?) it happens again!


Dog Fight:

My two border collies got into it and I was dumb enough to get in the middle. Three stitches later I am ok.  Luckily there was no serious damage.

Norm

Dog Bite Dog Bite

Dog Bite:

Hello my name is Tanya. I have a 2 year old Jack Russell who bit me and thought these photos may help. I am including a letter that I have sent out to people and rescue homes so that you can have a better idea of my situation, incase you wish to use my photos.
 
Any questions, please feel free to email me back.
 
Sincerely-Tanya

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello everyone. I hope this finds you all well.
 
About 3 weeks ago, my boyfriend Jay and I adopted a beautiful 2 year old female and spayed Jack Russell named Sassy. Sassy also just received her distemper and rabies shots and just started her heart guard pill and we treated her with Frontline Plus.  

Sassy's previous owner claimed that Sassy was his niece's dog and that his niece went off to college so she had to give her up. He never told us that she had an aggression problem. Once we found out that Sassy did have an aggression problem, we tried to contact the previous owner immediately and he would not return our calls. Although our Sassy has this problem, she is also a very sweet and smart dog! Jay's cousin is a former trainer, and together, they have been training her and have had great success. Sassy is a great walker and she loves to play. She is already well into her first few commands.  The problem is that she is also a random biter. This wouldn't be the end of the world, as we believe that all animals deserve a fare chance and it takes dedication and time to help an aggressive little Jack. Our issue is that it's not just us in the house, we also have my 15 year old daughter who lives with us and we can NOT take a chance with her safety or anyone else's! All we want is for Sassy to have a chance with people that know what  her special needs are and that may be able to help her find a good life in a loving environment. If you can please help us!  Jay and I are prepared to do everything in our power to make this happen. If any of you know any NON KILL rescue homes or anyone who is willing to adopt her who is aware of her issues and does NOT have children, then please get back to us as soon as possible. We would be greatly appreciate it.

Much love- Tanya and Jason

Dog Bite Dog bite
Dog Bite  

In the News:

Perhaps this can be a beyond-a-dog-bite story for you.  In this case, the unattended dogs were roaming free and the unattended baby mauled to death was strapped in her car seat.  Montreal.  Just happened.

It's so tragic and so beyond stupid and irresponsible that it boggles the mind.

A supporter of your work and site,
Elizabeth

CBC News | June 8, 2010

Mom. Grandma arrested after dog kills infant

Click to read article

A teen mother and her mother face charges of criminal negligence causing death after a dog mauled and killed a newborn girl on Montreal's south shore on Monday.

The pair were arrested after emergency workers were called to a house in Saint-Barnabé-Sud, near St-Hyacinthe, on Monday afternoon.

Paramedics found the baby girl covered in deep bite marks and scratches. Police said she had been left strapped in her car seat on the second floor of the house when she was attacked.

There was sufficient evidence to arrest both the mother and grandmother, said Quebec police Sgt. Ronald McInnis. Both had left the infant inside to go look at the yard and neither took "care of the baby," he said.

Two Husky dogs live on the property and were roaming freely when the mauling happened, McInnis added.

Both women will appear in court on Tuesday to face charges of criminal negligence causing death.

Article Update:

http://ottawa.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20100607/dog-mauls-newborn-100608/20100608/?hub=OttawaHome


Puppy Bite:

Mr. Frawley,

Here is a picture of my brother's nose after his brand new 9 week old pup so ferociously jumped up to lick his face. I am in the habit of reading through the Q & A section on your website every night before I go to sleep. The ignorance of so many dog owners is incredibly sad at times but I must admit I find myself in hysterical laughter so often just based on the answers you give them. So when I read about people with "vicious," "ferocious," or "aggressive" 8 week, 9 week or 10 week old puppies that are usually just being puppies using their mouths I gotta laugh. So I felt obligated to send this to you. The pup got him on both sides of his nose and it went completely through!!! OUCH!! We were all able to laugh about it after the bleeding stopped.

I must write you an entirely separate email expressing my appreciation and gratitude for You and Cindy. I have 2 of your DVDs that I received this week. I am watching Establishing Pack Structure with the Family Pet for the 2nd time right now. My Australian Cattle Dog Pup, Anthem, is snoozing in her crate and I just admire what you do so darn much it cannot be expressed in this short email. THANK YOU!

Your Appreciative Friend in California,
Heather

Dog bite to nose


Dog Bite:

My two younger female dogs were getting snarky with each other. My older dog decided to join in. I was afraid she would get hurt so I reached in to pull her away. As you can tell I lost. Big lesson learned on breaking up a dog fight. Luckily the hand works fine with no permanent damage.

Janet

dog bite dog bite

Cindy's Response:

Oh my gosh, that is horrible. I’m so glad your hand works after such a serious injury.

What kind of dogs do you have?

Thanks so much for taking the time to send these.

Cindy Rhodes

Janet's Response:

The dogs were a Golden Retriever and a pound dog mix. The older dog was a Dalmatian. I was fortunate that they did not tear the tendon you can see in the picture. As bad as it looks it was all a flesh wound. It happened so fast I didn't even realize I got bit until I saw the blood. I got very lucky.


Dog Bite:

This is a photo of my hand after surgery, which resulted when I broke up a fight between two intact male Pembroke Welsh Corgis. They had been living together peacefully for four months prior to this incident.

One was ten years old (attached photo) and one was only two, and I was afraid the younger one would actually kill the older one, or I would have let them settle it. They are both large for Pembrokes; 32-34 pounds. 

The older one’s teeth are actually what got me, though he didn’t realize it; he was biting down on the other dog. My index finger ended up curled up between his molars (still not really sure how I got in that position) and he splintered the bone in the back of my hand.

I was home alone, and eventually I got them apart by spraying Bitter Apple in their faces, eyes, mouths, until I could get one loose long enough to throw him in a crate. I had gotten them apart a few times before that, but then the other would leap up and attach himself to some part of the one I had grabbed (I’m not very tall and my arms are not long enough to keep them separated).

It was a terrifying time; probably lasted about 15 minutes. I have kept them apart for a year now, and I immediately neutered the younger one. I have been considering getting muzzles and trying them loose together that way to see how they behave. It’s been over a year now.

Sincerely,
Sherry

Cindy's Response:

Hi Sherry,

Thank you for taking the time to write and send the photos. Hopefully your experiences can help someone else prevent injury. I will comment that muzzling these two dogs and letting them loose together again would be a huge mistake. 

If you can’t work on fixing the aggression between them through training, then putting them together with muzzles will actually only create more bad feelings between them. Muzzles are great tools for preventing injury, but we never recommend muzzling dogs (especially dogs with a history of fighting w/ each other) and turning them loose. Muzzles can amplify the aggressive behavior, as the dogs feel huge amounts of frustration. Many protection trainers use muzzles to build a dog’s drive to bite and be aggressive (i.e. police dogs).  I can’t stress enough that I would not recommend trying it.

If you want to try re-introducing them,  I’d read the article Ed wrote on introducing dogs.

Cindy Rhodes


Dog Bite:

Hi Ed,
 
Like the site and information.
 
I have 5 children, 1 wife and 1 dog.
 
I am writing you to share this weekend's episode of dog bites kid, and to vent some of my frustration, with poor dog owners and they are usually in denial.

We went camping this extended weekend at a lake, (we have had other social interactions, several times with this family at their home), and they brought their dogs, everything seems normal, I ask about their 12 year old shepard's health in general, knowing that these animals have age issues with their backs and hips, I got a non-committal kind of reply, and I noticed that the dog seemed to have glaucomic eye distention, (Eyeball seems more rounder, protruding), and asked the owner if the dog seemed to have any difficulty seeing. again I got a non-committal response like, no, not yet.
 
(Back Ground: I had been a Navy Corpsmen since 1982, and the person I was speaking with was a Physicians Assistant).
 
Anyway, his wife took the animals to the water to play, and get wet, and they, the animals and kids had interacted before, and were playing in and by the water just fine, (How ever the wife stated that the dog seemed to be having difficulty with depth perception, miss stepping and "falling off" the submerged ledge, and getting a little panicky, so she guided the animal back to the beach, and to their tent site.
 
That evening, We came to their tent site to visit, my 5 y/o boy sat down behind the dog and went to give it a hug. The dog started like it was scared, and barked/bit my son twice in the face. We were fortunate that it was not a worse bite, as you can see in the pictures, it would have been the entire right side of his face.
 
I treated my boy with ice to keep the swelling down, and check up with the owners on the status of the rabies vaccination. All is okay there. I asked them if they would have their dog examined by a vet, I wanted them to, for safety of others, as they have a nice, timid 13 year old daughter. I hope they do, and that there is no other incidents.
 
My Boy is fine, tough nut that he is, even wanted to pet the dog that bit him afterwards.
 
I have always cautioned my kids about animals in general, but especially dogs and the do's and don't's with them.
 
We adopted a 4 year old Blue Heeler from the local shelter when my boy was about 18 months old, the first trial we did, was controlled and tethered socialization at the shelter for compatibility, the dog, Chickory, first went to a corner and relieved herself, then the next thing she did was to submit herself to the boy, on her back and whining at his feet.
 
She has been a protector for our kids every since, (we now also have twin 3.5 y/o's). Chickory is an Alpha female, spayed, and never allowed to be aggressive towards any children, (we have lot's of kids and friends over).
 
Hope you can use the pictures.
 
Thanks,
Roger

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Dog Bite:

Fresh from last night... It was between a 2 year old male, neutered Malamute and a 5 year old female, spayed GSD/Siberian mix. Both indoor, normally loving dogs. I've never even heard the Malamute growl. She was the instigator, and stole his toy. She had bullied him from a pup and he has just now gotten brave enough to fight back. We tried grabbing hind legs, putting a bucket over heads, throwing a bucket over water, throwing the actual bucket, inserting a folded chair in between, then my husband did the unthinkable and grabbed a collar. He knew better, too. We finally turned the hose on them.

Rachel

dog bite


Dog Bite:

Hello!

I recently made the mistake of trying to separate two of my dogs; and this was the result. Unfortunately I did not take a picture before stitches as my veins and bones were exposed and I was not thinking clearly.

I am an animal behaviorist and Welfare Inspector, and so have no excuse at all.

Henriette

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Dog Attack:

We did everything wrong in bringing a new dog in to our pack, and, apparently, weren't living correctly with that pack anyway. A massive 4 way dog fight ensued, one was almost killed, and we got the living sh*t bit out of us breaking it up. Now we are starting from scratch with the "Establishing Pack Structure" video. We also will watch the "Dominant and Aggressive Dogs" video as well. We wonder if the dogs can ever be left alone together outside, presuming we actually work your program? Cindy said no, and like a patient trying to find a doctor to tell them what they want to hear, I'm asking you. No disrespect to Cindy. Right now they are all sleeping quietly on their assigned pads in the living room. But I never know if a big blow up will occur. We are keeping them separated during the day, walking them all together at night, and have totally regulated their behavior in a way we never did before.

Rhae Leigh has healed beautifully, she's minus one ear, she nearly died at one point! Now she's running around like it never happened. $7,000.00 later.

Photo quality a little crappy for your website, just included for your info. Of course, you've seen it all before.

Thanks to God my hand healed, I'm a surgeon. I KNEW not to stick my hand in there, but the wheelbarrow trick didn't work. They were locked on to Rhae Leigh like a vice. If push comes to shove, we could re-home the new guy, we never had trouble prior to that. But, as you say, it was our fault, not his. We thought we had a good pack structure, but we were really not all the way there. And yes, we are Cesar fans. Now I don't know what to think of him. That acupuncture crap just made me wonder if he has spent WAY too much time in L.A.

Michael

Dog Bite
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Ed's Response:

Cindy is a better dog trainer than I am I suggest that you follow her advice on keeping these dogs separated for life and running them all through pack structure.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

Our two German Shepards got into a fight over what we believe is territorial aggression. My wife tried to separate the dogs and was bit on the arm, above the elbow. Here are a couple pictures of the dogs and the bite.

The black shepard is the attacker, Dante. The brown shepard, Kylie, was attacked and received 16 stitches on her left leg. My wife received 3 stitches from the bite.

Thanks for the info on your site. It really helps us with the problem we had.

Shaun


Dog Bite:

Hello. I am Skylar, I am 17 years old, and I'm from Iowa.

My mother and sister heard word of a dog a few towns away, that would make a great family pet. So we went maybe 11 miles out to get him. As the first couple of weeks had gone by, we began to notice he was VERY hyperactive. So, I would take him on 3-4 walks a day to calm him down. August 6th, 2010, I took him on his first walk of the day, everything was going great, besides the constant dragging me half way down the street. Lol, he's a big boy. Ha ha. Well, I thought it was a good idea to stop by at his dog friend's house, Joker. They were always good to one another always happy to see each other, nothing out of the norm. So we get there, they're playing as usual, when Joker decides to run down the street (we live on the same street). Of course Murk wants to run after him, and begins to pull me down the street, I tried my hardest to pull him back in hope of Murk calming down for once. As I'm pulling his leash back, his body turned and slipped his collar. My dog Murk, runs down the street after him, wanting to play. Joker is a much older dog and I suppose took it the wrong way. Not to mention Joker had wandered off into our yard, which is Murks territory. Murk gets to Joker, and tries to play, and joker being older, took it the wrong way, and began to maul my dog. This went on for maybe 15 minutes, I'm screaming and yelling, completely in a state of panic. My dog is a pit bull lab mix. And joker is a pit bull bulldog mix. So, as I've heard rumors, once pits begin to fight there is no stopping them. So, I grabbed murks collar, (stupid to break up a dog fight I know, I just didn't want one of them to die). As I did this, Joker, grabbed hold of my arm and began thrashing his head around as if I was a rope toy. Beginning to feel my bone slowly being crushed, I could either, A: Let him tear my arm up, and cause more damage. OR B: Rip my arm away from him, while he still had a chunk full of my skin in his mouth. I chose B. I had to go to the Emergency room, and they gave me a few stitches (messed them up by the way). Low & behold the sheriff shows up and starts asking me questions. I wasn't even worried about my arm in the least bit, I just wanted to make sure the dogs were okay. Well, after me pleading with the officer, and telling Jokers fantastic background of being a wonderful dog, he had filed his papers and was on his way. I get home a few hours later, and the police told Mike, (the owner of joker) that he had to be under a ten day watch, he wouldn't be put to sleep, because it wasn't an attack it was an accident. I'm the dumby who decided to break up a dog fight and I take full blame for my bite, it was not Joker's fault, he didn't know better. Once dogs get into that rage attack mode, there's no "Oh you're my owner, I won't bite you." No way. Our towns city council people, or whatever, told Mike he had to give away his dog because there were to be no pits in town. I mean, we live in a town with 250 people. And he was going to give him away to the humane society, but there was a waiting list? I think? Something along those lines, and instead, had Joker be put to sleep.

WELL ANYWAYS MISTER. THIS IS WHAT OPTION B LOOKS LIKE. ; D

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Ed's Response:

You made a lot of common mistakes here. I recommend that you spend some time reading my web site. Besides the fact that you should not have assumed these dogs liked one another, you should not have had this kind of collar on the dog. It should have been a prong collar with a dominant dog collar as a backup.

The fact is you have a dominant dangerous dog. It needs to go through a pack structure program, this is laid out in detail in our DVD, Establishing Pack Structure with the Family Dog. Read the description on the web page for this DVD.

I hope this information is followed and you never have to go through this again.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Thanks:

Good Morning,
 
Thank you for making a page dedicated to showing the effects/results of humans improperly trying to stop dog fights or other situations. I was wondering if you could include more pictures of the dogs that bit so people know that its not just  the stereotypical dogs that can bite. I have been a law enforcement officer since 1998. A couple of years ago I was working in Alabama and investigated some goats that were being attacked by local dogs. I expected 1/2 wild dogs to be the perpetrators. After searching the area,  I returned to the area of the goat pin and one of the dogs was inside chasing the goat, after it had already attacked it. The big, soft, fluffy golden retriever was going after the goat with a "smile" on its face like it was chasing a ball, not a living thing. The other dog was found later. It was a fluffy friendly mixed breed. Both were family dogs that at night slept in the bed with their adolescent boy owners kids. Both had very pleasant dispositions and were quite friendly to humans. Both had blood all around their mouth from the goat. I checked their mouths to verify that the blood was not the dogs own. Both were completely fine with me manipulating their bodies and mouths to check for wounds on their selves. No aggression whatsoever. I made sure the owner saw the blood on the dogs and saw the goat. Otherwise there may very well have been : "not MY dog" issues.  

Thank you for the wealth of free information you provide on your sight. I plan on purchasing some DVDs from you guys when I get back from deployment.  


Dog Bite:

Hi, I just wanted to share some pictures of what happened to me after my pit bull mix attacked me. I was walking him, and he saw 2 dogs approaching our path. I turned around, since I knew how upset and aggressive he gets. He did not like that and jumped on me. He bit me about 10 times, but for some reason he would let go and then come back to bite me again. My chocolate lab came very fast to get the dog off me. We went to  private obedience training. It went well for a while, but after he turned a year old, he started biting who ever was walking him to attack other animals. He is very aggressive towards them, he was going to the "Red Zone"  in a second. 

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Cindy's Response:

Thanks for sharing the photos. I would put this dog in a strict routine of no privileges and start with our groundwork program.

I’d also get a muzzle,  we have directions on how to measure the dog on this page. And a dominant dog collar.

You should study Pack Structure for the Family Pet and Dealing with Dominant & Aggressive Dogs.

We also have a number of eBooks, which include topics that may help you. 

This is a very dangerous scenario and if you don’t take care of this it’s only going to escalate in the future. Good luck!

Cindy Rhodes


Dog Bite:

Fresh from last night... I hope you can clean it up a little bit. It was between a 2 year old male, neutered Malamute and a 5 year old female, spayed GSD/Siberian mix. Both indoor, normally loving dogs. I've never even heard the Malamute growl. She was the instigator, and stole his toy. She had bullied him from a pup and he has just now gotten brave enough to fight back. We tried grabbing hind legs, putting a bucket over heads, throwing a bucket over water, throwing the actual bucket, inserting a folded chair in between, then my husband did the unthinkable and grabbed a collar. He knew better, too. We finally turned the hose on them.

Rachel

Dog Bite


Dog Fight:

Hello Ed,

One of my puppy purchasers call me in hysterics yesterday. Her 2 year old male german shepherd had just been attacked by a pit bull while she was visiting her daughter. Because she had visited your website, she was able to tell a neighbor who came to help to grab the pit bull by the hind legs and pull him off her dog. Fortunately the neighbor was a big strong man, and the pit bull let go as soon as his hind legs came off the ground. The pit bull was in the red zone and we are sure without the right intervention, her german shepherd would have been killed. It could have been much worse. Attached are photos.

I always provide my puppy buyers with your DVD, Your puppy 8 weeks to 8 months, and suggest they visit your website to have a look at various articles, such as how to break up a dog fight. Fortunately she took my advice and your website was there.

Once again, a big thank you from a very grateful dog owner and the breeder for all your hard work and dedication.

Edith


Dog Bite:

After the most recent family dog fight, I did a web search and found your site and article on breaking up a dog fight. Your article requested dog bite pictures, so I thought I'd send these. My husband had 9 loose stitches in the palm of his hand because the skin was pulled away down to muscle. You can also see some puncture wounds. The other side of his hand has a larger puncture wound. 

Both dogs ended up with multiple puncture wounds, one of which swelled up alarmingly and leaked for over a week. It's almost a month later and their scabs are finally coming off.

Here's the scoop: Six years ago my young daughter and I lived alone. Both our dogs (a Shepherd and a Lab mix) died of older age and causes. Keep in mind I've always had large dogs and coached them to be kind to everything, including our cats, children and other dogs.

My daughter and I then adopted a rescue dog: a wonderful male Rottweiler, Rocket, approximately 1.5 years old. Rocket was scheduled to be put down in an Ohio pound, so we have no history on him. For the first few years of having Rocket, if my daughter or I would cry, Rocket would shrink and leave the room, as if scared. About a year later, I met John, a 6'2" large man with a booming voice. From the start Rocket had a problem with John and similar-type males. He would, and still will, skirt around John while huffing and making aggressive moves when John moves from one room to another or walks up or down stairs. Outdoors there are no problems. We suspect he and his female owners were abused by a large male.

When John and I were married about five years ago, Rocket had a hard time warming up to him. (Today, Rocket will ask John for attention or lay his head in John's lap, but only if John's sitting.) Being a dog fan himself, John wanted a second dog so he'd have a companion, plus we both believe two dogs are better than one. So we adopted another male rescue, Lucky, a Husky mix. The two hit it off and are best brothers. 

After our marriage, John's son moved in with Diago, the male Golden he and his ex-wife got when Robert was a child.  Again, all went well... one big, happy family with three male dogs all between six and eight years old.

Then came the surprise. Two years ago John's ex-wife received a male Rott as a gift, but when Mason turned four months old she found out she needed surgery and couldn't continue to have him. Meantime, Robert had grown attached to the dog while living with his mom during the summer, so we relented and took Mason. While Rocket appears to be more of an American bred Rott, Mason has papers dating back to excellent stock and it's apparent he's extremely smart. But I had a breeder I know check out his heritage and, from the start, he was concerned about mixing the two Rotts together.

All four dogs are fixed. Mason's now 2.5 years old. There weren't conflicts with Mason when he was a growing puppy. But then they started small and have built up since. Diago, the Golden, never gets involved. Lucky, the Husky, has been part of the attacks without being an instigator. Mostly, it's been the two Rotts who are having problems. Mason seems to think he's the coolest thing around, or is too carefree to care if Rocket is challenging him. Rocket still thinks he should be the dominant male; after all, he was king before any of the other men or dogs came around. 

But Rocket is getting older and having joint problems, so he's losing the battles, but he's determined not to give up.  He still tries the dominant stance over Mason, and Mason stares at him with that glare which says he doesn't believe in the "law." Ever since the last battle a few weeks ago, we have to constantly move the two apart because we can see the hairs start to rise. 

We realize yelling at them when they fight does no good. And, obviously, putting yourself between them is stupid. We don't believe in physical harm, but John's had it and I don't know what will happen next time. With past dogs, letting them fight it out always worked out fine with no injuries. But the two Rotts are different. I'll tell the family about the method in your article (which I read in others, as well), but we tend to panic.

We dearly love all of our four dogs, two cats, turtle and fish. Our furry friends sleep with us and watch TV on the couch with us. Giving one away or putting one down is not an option. 

Kind regards,
Kathy
Chicago, IL

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Dog Fight:

Hi Cindy,

Last week I had to break up a dog fight between 2 German Shepherd bitches alone. I have never been so scared or overwhelmed in my life!

I was a taking care of a kennel of 5 dogs for a week while the owners were away at a big show on the other side of the country. The week was going smoothly until Friday night. I had an agility show with my dogs over the weekend so I was feeding the dogs and putting them in kennels in the morning and cleaning them at night so I wouldn't have to rush. Friday we had a huge rainstorm come through so I wanted to put the dogs in early so I could clean the kennels in daylight. I had had a really long but good day with my dogs and just wanted to go home feed them and relax for the evening. This could have been the first mistake.

I brought  the dogs in one by one put them in the crates in the garage and between bringing in the second to last dog and the last dog, the first older bitch  had gotten out of her crate and had found some spilled food on the ground. The younger  bitch that was with me runs up the crate line just being happy and as soon as the older bitch sees her, a fight blows up.

I grab both dogs by the back of their necks and get them up on their back feet so that the wouldn't get any leverage to rip and tear at each other. I try to pull the older bitch off and shove her in a crate but it wasn't working so I walked them over to the puppy kennels on the wall and shove the younger bitch in the kennels and try to shut the door. Meanwhile they are both ready to kill each other and the younger is trying to get out and the older is trying to push through my legs and around my sides. I beat her on the head and get her back to get the kennel door closed. I finally get the older dog in the crate and leave to try to calm myself down.

I have never in my life had to break up a fight let alone a fight between 2 GSD's alone. All that was running through my head as I'm trying to get them apart are the thoughts "What if I can't get them apart?" "What happens if I get hurt in the crossfire and can't get them apart?" "How am I going to get to a vet afterward if I need to?"

In the end the fight was small in comparison to what it could have been. I came away with 2 very deep bruises on my belly and the younger bitch had a few scrapes on her head and  a puncture wound on her elbow that the vet decided not to stitch. I came away with a new respect and realization of how important it is not to rush and make sure that everything is latched and safe.

I know how  bad this could have been and realize that I got off easy and was very lucky that I was able to get them apart as fast and efficiently as I did and at the same time control the fight. I made mistakes in underestimating these dogs and not controlling their environment and a result I am reminded by the nasty bruises on my belly. I learned my lesson and I will never take for granted the importance of latches and leashes.

Aliza


Dog Bite:

Hi Cindy,

We were given this dog which was a Dutch shepherd by corrective services to try and train and socialize as he was very aggressive, it had attacked kennel staff and was suffering from a severe case of kennel spin due to being kenneled for most of it’s life. I believe the dog was mentally damaged, he had also chewed his own tail off.

My partner pulled the dog out of the car and was walking him, and just socializing with him.  He was comfortable with me petting him and so my partner handed me the leash while he organized water buckets etc. The dog was sitting with his head resting on my hip and I was stroking him calmly. As my partner disappeared from site, the dog started to growl and by the time I yelled out to my partner the dog had taken a bite of my hip and then went to the arm and chewed down my left arm. I managed to pull him off as my partner got back to me and as he came off my left arm managed to get a bite in on my right arm. 

My partner managed to get him into our kennel where he proceeded to spin and try and chew what is left of his tail. 

I went to the kennel after I had collected myself to try and approach him again but he tried to attack me through the fence. Unfortunately with further attempts the dog showed very erratic and unpredictable behavior taking every chance he could to take a chunk out of anyone who tried to work with him. We returned the dog to corrections as he was just too dangerous.

We were advised in the coming days that the dog had done some pretty major damage to one of the kennel staff and so the dog had to be put down.

I have many of your DVDs and read the articles on your site often when it comes to the training of my dogs.  Your training has helped in the development of my dogs for many years now … Thank you!!


Dog Bite:

Dear Mr. Frawley-

I wish I had come across your website sooner...
However it is because of multiple instances that have happened in my house this week that have caused me to submerge myself in your website and send you this desperate email.

I got my dog Bella back in April when she was about 2-3 months old. I have never completely figured out what kind of dog she but I have always guessed there was some Chow in her. Perhaps you have a suggestion based of my pictures?

Anyway, in the past week and a half Bella has suddenly become very aggressive with our other dog Daisy. She is a bit smaller then Bella, maybe by about 10 pounds. The first 2 instances were over food. Bella has seemed to develop a food aggression and perhaps even a toy aggression. If we give them both treats Bella will go after the one that Daisy has. Also, when feeding Bella, she has become quite territorial over her food if Daisy comes near it and tries to eat. I've gotten to the point where I am desperate for your suggestion and or help. This past Friday night Daisy and Bella got into a terrible fight over a raw hide. I know never to step in on a dog fight, however my roommate instinctively jumped right in and ended up having her right forearm bitten terribly. She had 3 very deep puncture wounds, I have attached a picture of the worst. We ended up sitting in the ER most of the night. The same thing happened again on Sunday night and each of the dogs walked away with some cuts. Since then I have been feeding Bella when daisy is not around and we give them treats in separate rooms or one inside and one outside. Tonight we put Bella outside with her treat and left daisy inside. Bella did not eat her treat but daisy did. We let Bella back inside and she went straight for daisy. Luckily my roommates husband scooped daisy up before Bella got to her. But this time there were no treat involved and Bella still went for her. We have been having the dogs sleep separately most of the time now. I can't understand where this sudden change in behavior has come from and I don't know what to do. I love Bella to death and giving her up just isn't an option. What do you suggest? Is there anything that I can be doing to solve this? Should I get Bella a muzzle? What boggles my mind is that we have had a baby kitten in our house since July and Bella has raised it like its her own. The kitten thinks that Bella is her mom in some respects. They play together and Bella is so gentle. But lately Bella has no tolerance for daisy.

Any help or suggestions you could offer would be greatly appreciate as I am desperate to solve this before someone else gets hurt. She has not gone out of her way to be aggressive towards people, is there any reason this could change?

Thank you for taking your time to read my email.

Sincerely,
Meryl

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Ed's Response:

This dog needs a serious pack structure program and you have to be prepared to change the way you live with the dog. If this doesn’t happen, she will kill the small dog and bite you again. I have a folder full of people who have had one of their dogs kill the other.

Food and toys need to go away – forever. In the pack structure program, we teach that toys are our toys and we allow the dog to play with our toys, but after play we take them away and put them up. They only have access when we allow it and they are never left out. The food is always fed in the dog crate – ALWAYS – and the dogs are never around food or bones or anything else that resembles food outside of the crate.

Get the DVD I produced titled Establishing Pack Structure with the Family Dog. Read the description on the web page for this DVD and Dealing with Dominant and Aggressive Dogs.

I have written extensively on pack structure on my web site. You should use our SITE SEARCH function found at the top left of every page.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

Hi,

I wanted to share some information with you in regards to your site on Dog Bites. I am a Police Officer, 34 years and 28 of that 34 years has been devoted to the handling and training of K9s. 

Over the years I have witnessed some very serious dog bites. Some were the result of deploying a trained K9 on a dangerous fleeing or combative suspect. Many were not police K9s and were domesticated  pets. Whatever the relationship, any related dog bites I witnessed were sudden and swift with drastic consequences. 

Not all bites were necessarily  physically disabling,  but serious none the less due to the psychological impact on the victim. This impact can last a life time creating a intense fear of dog's and or  animals in general.

During the course of my career involving  years of working with high drive canines, I was very fortunate to not have experienced a serious dog bite. I have experienced the pressure of the  canines jaws numerous times with the necessary protection and controls  in place. I have always maintained  a healthy respect for K9s and am always aware they are "animals" and are capable of inflicting unimaginable trauma in a matter of seconds.

In 2010 during a training exercise of a single purpose dog (explosive detection canine with obedience) the subject dog a Belgium Malinois got away from the handler, no collar or leash attached. The dog began to circle a nearby vehicle containing a very large & powerful German Shepherd dog. I was nearby attempting to prevent injury to both canines when suddenly the male Malinois turned on me. My reaction was immediate I had to give him my forearms to protect my throat & face. This attack took less than three seconds. I was able to remain calm and directed the handler to carefully remove his dog from the attack without causing further trauma to my limbs. He did get bite in the hand, but able to throw a toy down which was enough to distract the dog and was able to secure him back in his vehicle. My bite was through three layers of heavy clothing. It could have been worse had I and the other teams present panicked. I  learned a lesson as did the new handler. One must maintain control over the animal at all times. Once you get complacent and sloppy and forget what potentially you have on the end of the leash you become an accident waiting to happen. I  have been fortunate over the years because I have always been very conscious of animal behavior and what can lead from a calm submissive animal to primal protective reactions under certain circumstances. Hope this can assist others in the field.

Thanks for your insight,
Ken


Question:

Hi Ed,

I have been reading some of your articles, advice and other people´s comments.

I have 6 dogs - four males and two females
1 male is a newfoundland at 2 years old
1 female is a Akita at 8 months old
3 other males are all rescued from the street
1 female rescued from the street

We have a 5000 square meter property, live across the road from a huge hill.  The dogs are well looked after.

The problem I am having is that 3 of the males have now attacked the other male 3 times, once monthly.

Two of the males jump around and do little damage but the one male - medium size always goes for the back leg - the same leg every time and in the same place.  The attacked dog just finishes healing and it happens all over again.

December 1st was the last incident, he is still healing and walking on three legs.

Last Tuesday, December 22nd, they were all barking at a dog in the street and everyone got excited and a fight started, of course the attacked dog again was the main target but I ran outside screaming and pulled the dogs off him, after pulling off the one who always does the most damage, he came back and bit me on the left leg - front and back. Of course at the time I felt the bite, but no pain. I was so busy trying to prevent the attacked dog from his fourth attack. Anyway we managed to stop them and I went off to the emergency room.

I'm better now - was a big bite.

Anyway - I need some advice on what to do when having 4 males.  I would of thought after the first attack, dominance would have been established. I can't continue living like this, worrying about my one male getting killed.

My one female is fixed and the other will be done next week.

Can you advise what to do about the males - non of them are fixed.

Thank you

dog bite

Answer:

You have a dog pack and you need to establish leadership and train them. This means keeping them separate when you can't supervise and not allowing dogs that don't get along to interact in ways that instigate a problem. This may mean forever keeping some of them separated.

I'd recommend having crates or kennels for each dog, dominant dog collars and muzzles. We have directions on how to measure the dogs for muzzles on this page.

I'd also recommend Pack Structure for the Family Pet and Dealing with Dominant & Aggressive Dogs.

You are right to be worried, this problem won't go away. It will escalate if you don't make changes.

We also have a number of eBooks, which include topics that may help you.

If you spend some time reading this section on dog fights, you'll see that your problems are very common. I've received 6 or 7 emails just today from dog owners with very similar problems. If you don't teach the dogs your rules, they can't possibly behave how you want them to.

Cindy Rhodes


Dog Fight:

The Chow Rott, her name is Bear, is about 6 years old. We also have a male American Eskimo around 4 years old, named Buddy and the Australian Kelpie is 3 years old, her name is Angel. Angel is very protective of Don, my boyfriend, and I believe her to be jealous of attention given to Bear at times.

This particular fight, where my boyfriend's hand was bitten by Bear, just happened in October 2010. Not the first fight between these two dogs but the first where Bear bit him. Not quite sure what started the fight this time, we were inside and it was evening time. I think my boyfriend and Angel were playing tug-a-war and Bear might have thought she was too rough with Don or she may have accidentally been stepped on or Angel could have jumped up and landed on her, it doesn't take much. I heard Don tell Angel no and said it again and by the time I rounded the corner to the dining room they were in full fight mode. Don was pretty much pinned against a door with both dogs at his feet. He was trying to pull Bear off Angel, Bear always gets the best of Angel, she's so much bigger. When he got her away from Angel, then Angel would never give up and keep charging and snapping at Bear. I grabbed a hold of Angel and got the door open so Don could toss Bear in the other room. There was so much blood on us, the floor and the wall/door that at first I didn't know Bear had bitten him. Don did not get stitches and healed totally in 3 weeks. Angel is a very loving dog and enjoys playing with other dogs but for some reason she only tolerates Bear and it doesn't take much to set them off. Bear, on the other hand, is animal aggressive in my opinion.

When Bear was 3 years old, Don's daughter was over and brought her little male Basingee/Chihuahua mix and somehow he got into the backyard with the other dogs (at this time we also had a 14 year old male wolf) and we thought it was going to be the wolf who would attack the little one but it was Bear. She rushed him, rolled him into a row of hedges and picked him up by the back of the neck and shook him like a little rag doll. By that time his daughter had reached them and was beating on Bear, to no avail of course. Don got there and literally had to cram his fist into Bears mouth to get the little dog away from her. Don and his daughter rushed her little dog to the vet and $900 later saved his life.

Bear and Angel don't fight all the time, plenty enough for me though, but when they do it's pretty bad. Angel usually winds up at the vet. She's had most of her puppy pads ripped off and sewn back together. She has had chunks of meat missing exposing bone where she had to get stapled shut. Every one of her legs, different occasions, have been casted, wrapped or splinted. It's awful scary. I'm afraid I'll come home from work and find Angel dead or seriously hurt. I tell Don, especially since he's been bitten, that we need to grab their rear legs and separate them but he doesn't want to believe that will work.

Well I hope my story helps you and others and I hope it wasn't to long and drawn out.

Best wishes to all,
Renee

Ed's Response:

    1. This dog would wear a remote collar from the moment he came out of his dog crate in the morning and it wouldn’t come off until he went to bed at night. It would become a part of this dogs life.

      Obviously I know how to use a remote collar. I produced a training DVD on this Remote Collar Training for the Pet Owner.

    2. In a social setting the dog would never be allowed another dog, either one of my own or a strange dog. If it was going to be around another dog it would also wear a wire basket muzzle.

    3. This dog needs to be run through a pack structure program. This is a very specific program that teaches a dog who his leaders are along with teaching the dog that there are rules to follow and consequences to not following rules. I did a DVD  on this Establishing Pack Structure with the Family Dog. Read the description on the web page for this DVD.

Good luck with your dog.

Regards,
Ed Frawley


Dog Bite:

This is what happened to me while I broke up my dogs fighting. I hag two dogs, 1 of which is a pit mix (male) the other is a small border mix (female). Most of the time they do fine but once in awhile they get into it. On this morning the argument was over food.


Dog Fight:

Our pittie mix (a rescue from the dog rescue where I volunteer) has been best friends with our grown daughter’s pit for a year now. The other day, they were outside with a bone and began a vicious fight. Our dog and our daughter were hurt pretty bad before we were able to break it up. I wish we had read your website so we would have known how to handle the fight without getting hurt. My daughter was hurt pretty bad (see photos) during the fight when our dog bit her. We were very upset, ready to have her put down, even though she had never been aggressive before. I can’t have a dog that bites people with my grand kids around. We read your website and realized that she was not trying to hurt our daughter. Thank God, and you, that we now have tools to handle a fight if we should ever experience that again. My daughter and I are going to keep our dogs muzzled (both purchased from your site) any time they are near other dogs just to be sure this never happens again.

Thank you!

Randi


Dog Bite:

Hi. My name is Shawn and the other day while trying to break up a dog fight, I was bitten by my Shepherd. I was searching around the net to research how to effectively stop a fight if it happens again since we have decided to keep both of the dogs involved. I noticed in your article that you asked for pics, and since mine is pretty severe, I wanted to send you a pic.

Thank you for posting that article, you taught me a lot, like the first thing I did wrong was try to break up two very powerful Shepherds by myself.

~S


Comment:

Because I stayed calm and used your method of breaking up a dog fight, I avoided being one of your gruesome photos on your Dog Bite site.

While I didn’t execute the break-up perfectly, I surely did things in a much safer manner!  I have 2 Aussies that are siblings.  I feed the female (the aggressor) in the kitchen and the male in the living room, mostly so the female doesn’t go after the male’s food.  He normally submits to her.

Well, I’ve started using the Honest Kitchen raw dog food and they both really love it!  This time when the female tried to raid the males bowl, the male said no way and their first real fight ensued.  I have to say, my first instinct was to reach for a collar, but then I stopped, collected myself and went and got 2 belts.  I slipped one belt around the female’s back hip area and basically dragged them both over to a door.  I secured the belt to the door handle.  I then put the 2nd belt around the male and pulled him up off his feet and he let go.  There was some blood but nothing too bad. 

I work in the aviation safety business and a rule of thumb is, in an emergency, your brain will take you back to the last training you had.  This was the case for me.  So please remind all your readers to LISTEN TO THE SAFETY BRIEFING and look for your exits when you get on board an aircraft.  You’ll be the one that knows how to get out!

Best Regards,
Jo


Dog Fight:

My girlfriend and I were walking our two dogs to the dog park (a 19 pound Westie and 65 pound Labradoodle). We crossed an intersection and saw a crazy dog in a vehicle trying desperately to get to our dogs. The owner of the dog had their windows open and the dog jumped out the windows and charged towards our westie (this dog was a mixed breed but had rottie in it, he was probably 75-85 pounds). He grabbed a hold of our Westie and flipped him over trying to bite at his neck. Before he was able to, I grabbed the dog by the jaw to prevent him from biting down. The dog ended up attempting to bite me and scratched up my legs very badly to try to get back to our Westie to kill it. It broke free and attacked our labradoodle before the owner of the dog finally came out to grab their dog (they only came out because I yelled I was going to call the cops on them). Eventually the owner got the dog in the car and asked if our dogs were OK. I told her that our Westie's leg was hurt and she then immediately said "Don't call the cops" and fled the scene.

Luckily we called the cops and I was able to get the license plate, so we have them and are filing a police report as I type.

Phil

Skinned Knees from Breaking up a dog fight


Dog Bite:

Cindy:

Here's the story of this picture:

I took this with my cell phone today, two days after the bite. This bite might be smaller than the rest on your website, but I wanted to share my story as I know many can relate.

I own a beautiful, non aggressive, lovable 3 1/2 year old black German Shepherd. He has been spoiled rotten since puppy. Lives indoor with us, gets to go out at lunch to potty when I come home EVERY SINGLE DAY for lunch. He has been socialized since puppy and really has no issues with other dogs. He had NEVER growled at anyone, big or small, including dogs, he just simply for some reason dislikes cats.

He has been attacked a couple of times by dogs but nothing serious and no injuries.  

Two days ago, I was with him on our driveway with the leash. There are two females German Shepherds who live down our street and get walked a lot by the girls in the family (about 10 years and 13 respectively). This time they were on their bikes. Charlie, our GSD has seen these dogs and we all know they are not friendly. They have nipped at Charlie before and I should have known better and gone inside the house, but I stayed there and gave the girl and her dog the benefit of the doubt. Wrong action...

As soon as her dog saw mine, she managed to get away and she ran straight to Charlie, who of course tried to defend himself, when my motherly instinct reacted and I tried to separate them with my leg, this picture you see is two days old. It is now starting to bruise. And of course, the other GSD did not directly attack me, my leg was in the way and she got me by mistake.

The owners came with the little girl afterwards and saw me cleaning the wound.  It hurt a LOT, so I can only imagine what those other horrific ones are like.

I went to the ER the day after to get a tetanous shot. The co pay was $125, which they have offered to pay. Animal control took their dog to quarantine for 10 days @ $10 a day. They were told that by law, big dogs are to be walked by people older than 17 years of age.

This happened in like 5 seconds. The girl got a hold of her dog that fast. If not, it would have been worse. I really do recommend getting the video to avoid situations like these. Including one for myself.


Dog Bite:

I got a female dalmatian at 12 weeks old and she was 19 months old when we got a 7 month old female dalmatian, they are cousins. They had a bit of a fight after 2 weeks, the older one putting the younger one in her place after constantly pushing her away from me, the oldest one having stiches in her back leg. The second time was a year later when the older one hadn’t finished her biscuits and the younger one was staring at her. Before I could reach them, the younger one pounced on her resulting in stitches on her leg. They have been together for 3 and a half years and for the past 6 months the younger one, whilst walking, will very often turn her head and stare at the other dog. If both on the sofa, one either side of me, the younger will stare at the other, sometimes beginning to tremble and then growling and staring.

Yesterday, the youngest dog (now 4), was sitting in the older dog's box (now 5) and she walked past, looked at the youngest and suddenly bolted for the door with the younger in pursuit who grabbed the back of her neck and started to shake her. I jumped in and was obviously bitten on the hand, puncture wounds on my arm and thumb. The older dog has a rip on the back of her neck and the younger is ok. 5 minutes later I took them for their usual walk and let them off lead and they played as usual, jumping over each other and knocking each other over. When we got home they had breakfast and played happily in the garden.

I am at a loss at what to do and I am thinking that re-homing of one is going to have to happen, as heartbreaking as it is.

dog bite dog bite
dog bite dog bite

Cindy's Response:

Rehoming is an option if you can’t do the training necessary. When you have 2 dogs and you haven’t established leadership with them both, they are going to do what comes naturally to all social animals. They are going to try to establish rank with each other. If they both think they are in charge, a fight is typically the result.

You need to take the leadership role, and show them that as the leader, you do not tolerate fighting.

Start with our groundwork program and Pack Structure for the Family Pet. I’d also recommend Dealing with Dominant & Aggressive Dogs.

You will need to separate the dogs and train each one individually at first.

We also have a number of eBooks, which include topics that may help you. 

If you spend some time reading this section on dog fights, you’ll see that your problems are very common. I’ve received 6 or 7 emails just today from dog owners with very similar problems. If you don’t teach the dogs your rules, they can’t possibly behave how you want them to.

You may need muzzles for them during the training process. We also have directions on how to measure the dog for a muzzle.
I hope this helps.

Cindy Rhodes


Dog Bite:

I tried to separate my 2, normally friendly, dogs from fighting and it resulted in me getting bit. I wish I would have read your article first.

To be perfectly honest, I'm not 100% sure what happened. My best guess is this:

We have 3 dogs Lola (shar pei, pit bull, boxer mix), we adopted her at 8 weeks old, now almost 4 years old. Molly is dog #2, as best we can tell she is a fox hound mix. We adopted Molly when she was around a year old, but no one really knows because she was a stray. When she came into our home back in Sept 2010, she was under weight and very aggressive with her food. So, I started feeding her as much as she would eat, the food aggression went away very quickly, now she is a healthy 62 lbs. The only issue I notice with her is that if a new toy is brought into the house, she wants it right away and will take it from the other dogs, and the other dogs will let her have it. 6 weeks ago we brought a new puppy into the home, Suka a pure bred lab. All 3 dogs appear to be getting along well, chasing and playing without any aggressive behavior. Yesterday I bought Suka a soft bone designed for puppies to chew on. When Suka was done with it then we placed it in her kennel and closed the door so the other dogs would leave it alone. Molly was very focused on the bone pawing at Suka's kennel trying to get at it. Lola went over to see what Molly was doing and Molly went after Lola. I let it go on for a moment, then pulled Lola's collar to get her away from Molly. (My big mistake) Molly came up and got my arm, but released it right away. I didn't scream or yell because this seemed to stop Molly in her tracks. I then kenneled both dogs, separately of course and the bone went directly into the trash. After an hour in their kennel we let them out one at a time and all seems to be back to normal.

This is the everyday Lola (left) and Molly (right).

dog bite dogs

Dog Bite:

Hi, my name is Rohit and I own a black Pomeranian. I am from India.

This incident occurred just couple hours ago (time 11:30 pm in India). Me and Sheero were having a regular walk on the street. There was a black, full grown aggressive Labrador at the end of the street. He was alone, his owner wasn't there, he probably must have slipped from his house. Also there was no one on the streets. I saw him and decided to turn around but Sheero barked at him and he came running towards us. I lifted Sheero in my arms and that dog jumped and grabbed my left arm (pic sent). I screamed and dropped Sheero, the dog was biting my poor little Sheero very ferociously. I punched that dog, kicked him, even tried to pull him but all in vain. Finally, I got hold of Sheero's head, pulled him out and threw him over a neighbor's gate and I too jumped there. The dog then ran away.

Sheero's tail and back portion was bleeding, now it has stopped a little. My hand is also bleeding too much. I applied normal antiseptic on both of us. It is night time so I have to wait till morning to go to the doctor and vet. I will first go to the family who owns that dog and ask them about the injections they had given to him.

I am too much worried about Sheero. If you are online please tell if anything would happen to him or he would be safe?

dog bite on arm

Cindy's Response:

I hope you got your dog to a vet and I hope he’s alright. For future reference, Ed has written an article about what to do if you are attacked by a stray or loose dog.

I’m sorry you had to go through this!

Cindy Rhodes


Dog Bite:

Mr. Frawley,

I read on your site that you were looking for dog bite pictures...
Here are two for you.

Background:
I own an in-home (their home) pet sitting company. I was at my initial meeting with the client (owner) and his dog (8 month old German Shepherd). The dog approached me and began sniffing my feet while I was beginning the conversation with the owner. Suddenly, without warning, the dog latched onto my hand and this is the end result. I am now almost 4 weeks since the bite and it is looking good... no serious damage done. They closed it with 5 stitches and 10 days of heavy antibiotics. Luckily the dog was up to date on his shots. Apparently, this dog has been aggressive towards people for quite awhile and has attempted to bite in the past. The owner took some bad advice and was treating the dog's aggression towards people and other dogs with an electric collar.

The picture with the suture in is 12 hrs. after the bite and the second picture is the day the sutures were removed.
Hope this helps.

DJ

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