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New Puppy Essentials

New Puppy Essentials

There are certain things that every new puppy owner should be prepared for. Deciding which products to buy and what learning material to review is the first step to that preparation, however there are so many products out there and so much information that it can become overwhelming. Leerburg would like to help simplify that by recommending a few of the products we use with our new puppies. We have broken the essentials down by category and simplified it by only recommending one or two products per category.

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Leerburg New Puppy Recommendations


Leerburg Online University Student Comment

Leerburg's Online Basic Dog Obedience Course

I have learned so much from this course that I never knew before. I could write a novel but for me the following is what stands out.

At the moment good management and consistency are really in the forefront as crucial to raising a happy puppy/dog (owners as well!) and therefore balanced dog training. I think if the dogs environment is not controlled whether that be crate training, socializing, bad behaviors, house rules, new owners will have their hands full and a dog that is soon uncontrollable. Far better to start good management with a puppy and teach it to engage with you. Both owner and dog will have a healthy and happy relationship. (how good is engagement, can't wait to start this with a puppy) Having said this Daisy is proof that you can teach an old dog new tricks.

This course has taught me that the above is a long term commitment. There is no quick fix! I am responsible for the raising of my puppy. From watching the DVDs in this course and listening to Ed talk all of the above will hopefully give me a rapport between my dog and myself and an understanding and closeness that will carry us through to competition obedience.

Read more student comments on Leerburg Online University

Leerburg Q&A
Ask your training question

Question: My dog attacks certain dogs and most recently a puppy. I do not understand why he does this. Do you know why?

Hi,

I have an 8 year old neutered male Doberman who I have had since a puppy. He has been a wonderful loving animal towards humans and most dogs. Several years ago he started dog aggressive behavior at the beach. He would start out with play and then become aggressive... grabbing the other dog by the neck and growling but never breaking skin.

I stopped taking him to the beach 2 years ago but still socialize him with friends' dogs...which has been fine. I have dogs over to my home and vice versa... he is always fine. Tonight I was walking him around an open field by my home and there is a small black lab puppy who also lives close by. He has attacked her once before for no reason...and did it again tonight. Luckily I have him on a leach and pull him off of her. She cries... and backs away. My dog never breaks the skin but acts very aggressive. I do not understand why he does this to only certain dogs and why to a puppy?

Ed's Response:

Why your dog does this is not important.

Managing the dog properly IS IMPORTANT. That starts with the leash on all the time when it’s around anther dog. You were lucky the dog was on leash. Here are some photos of people who didn’t have their dogs on a leash and they tried to break up their dog fighting.

This dog should not be allowed around strange dogs.

If we had this dog it would quickly learn that showing aggression is not acceptable behavior. It would learn that we are the pack leader and there would be no aggression unless we asked for it. It would get a correction that would not only change the dog's behavior and we would be consistent enough with that correction that  the dog would remember it the next time we told it to stop acting aggressively.

That’s not happening with you. Pulling the dog off a puppy says absolutely nothing to the dog. What did it learn from that? Not one single thing.

No dog is too old to train. Your dog is partially trained. I have that in the same book as being partially pregnant. A partially trained dog is an untrained dog.

You need some training as much as the dog does. We have a lot training resources, including online courses etc. Usually when I am blunt with people they go somewhere else. My point is you need a wake-up call, people get dog bit breaking up dog fights. When that happens people get sued and dogs get put to sleep. When people get sued they lose their home owners insurance because insurance companies HATE DOG BITES.

So why this dog does this is irrelevant. The fact is you have allowed this dog to become dog aggressive. If you love the dog you will get some training and then train your dog.

Regards,
Ed Frawley

For more questions on this topic, see our Q&A on Pack Structure and our Q&A on Aggressive Dogs.

We get a number of Q&As every week, if you would like to read this week's Q&As, click here and check out the 'Recent Questions' section!

Have a question for Ed & Cindy? Try the Leerburg Q&A Search. If you can't find the answer to your question by using our search engine, you can email Cindy here at Leerburg at cindyr@leerburg.com. If you have your spam filter on, make sure you set it to receive our replies!!!

Customer Comments

On Leerburg's Smoked Wild Salmon Crunchy Training Treats

 

Just got these and I must say my Malinois loves them. Very strong salmon fish smell which I think is what drives my pup towards them. Great product!

   
The Michael Ellis School for Dog Trainers
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