Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
10/13/2010 06:14 PM
Removing brown stains from teeth.
What are some good ways to remove brown stains from the front choppers?

Brodie has been on RMB diet for a while now and his molars have really whitened up but the fronts, particularly the canines, still have some brown.

Are the brown stains caused by Kibble diet?
Melissa Thom
(Webboard User)
10/13/2010 06:20 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
It's usually a sign that your pup might be due in for a dental. You might be able to hand scale it off or it might be time to visit the vet for them to do this for you.

I've heard tale that petzlife will slowly remove this but personally I just scale the calculus off where I can and have the vet tech do the rest.

While kibble fed dogs do get this stuff faster than non kibble fed pups all dogs can have dental build up.
Jessica Pedicord
(Webboard User)
10/13/2010 06:41 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Tropiclean makes a great product called Clean Teeth Gel. Someone I work with has been using it with great results. All you have to do is get some of the gel in the dog's mouth and it will coat the teeth and loosen plaque. I like the Tropiclean brand- its a reputable company with natural and gentle products. We use their products in our grooming salon.
Michael_Wise
(Webboard User)
10/13/2010 07:29 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Everything Melissa said.smiley for :grin:

Since most of our dog's raw meals aren't entire carcasses, the front teeth rarely get used. Not like the molars that get all the scrubbing action.

My dog is one of the ones that it doesn't matter, he is going to get some brown stains. Lack of saliva and poorly spaced teeth all play a role here.

Once you get them clean, either by gels, rinses, or you or the vet scaling them, a quick wipe with a damp towel once a day will go a long way to keeping them clean.

That last sentence has to be some sort of record for length and poor punctuation.smiley for :grin:
Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
11/09/2010 01:38 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Ended up doing finger brush or damp towel every couple of days. Seems to be helping smiley for :) I can't get Tropiclean locally but may order it from the net and give it a try as well.

I also started playing tug using a Leerburg 10" mini and it seems that the tug may be providing somewhat of a scrubbing effect on the fronts.

Does tug work help in this respect or is it just my imagination?

btw, someone should have warned me that when first learning the tug game, wear gloves!!!!!!!!!!!!
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
11/09/2010 02:13 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
In addition to what everyone else said- in my experience Collies are known for less then desirable teeth. smiley for :( My last boss bred, and I read a fair amount about the breed/learned a lot from her, and it seems pretty prevalent.

How old is Brodie?
Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
11/09/2010 04:47 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Brodie turned 5 this past Sept. I did have a dental cleaning performed shortly after I adopted him Sept 09, but as I recall, his teeth did not come out looking pearly white. The tech did say though that his teeth and gums looked healthy.
Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 03:51 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: Kelly Byrd
In addition to what everyone else said- in my experience Collies are known for less then desirable teeth. smiley for :( My last boss bred, and I read a fair amount about the breed/learned a lot from her, and it seems pretty prevalent.

Here is a recent image of the fronts. I've been brushing them periodically for about a month, but they look about the same as before brushing.

The rest of the teeth from canines back are white so I've left them alone. Breath is neutral, except burp-breath which can be pretty nasty at times.

Are these pretty typical of Collie teeth? And are they at a point where they might need scaling?

http://sinderon.net/images/IMG_0322_1.JPG
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 04:09 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
That looks just a a bit worse then average for a 5yr old dog to me... keep in mind about the collie teeth thing. smiley for :(

I see a bit of buildup on the lower right incisor (closet to the canine) along the gumline that could probably be scaled/chipped off, but other then that, to me it just looks like average discoloration.
I'm on my way out the door, but I heard of a new product recently, that is a water additive. Had great reviews from my vet. I'll look it up for you later!

Edited by Kelly Byrd (12/07/2010 04:10 PM)
Edit reason: his send too soon . :)
Niomi Smith
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 04:38 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Check this out:

http://www.lebalab.com/

I have heard some really great things about this product. I have never tried it personally, but if I ever found myself in your position, I would definitely give it a try.
Betty Landercasp
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 04:49 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
When Brodie is dozing in front of the TV I'd take my finger nail and
try to scrape some of that brown tartar off. If it scrapes off, I suspect his new diet will shine them up over time, or your vet could clean them. I think it will come off-there is a "chip" in the calculus on the back edge of the upper right canine, you can see a little triangle of "pearly white". If the material does not come off, it may be that the teeth are actually stained, either from your water, or possibly from administration of tetracycline when Brodie was a pup. His gums look healthy and I don't see any serious buildup of calculus at the gumline.
Richard Seward
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 05:41 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
My newest company Shepherd had horrible teeth when we got him at 2.5 years old. My vet said his teeth looked like a 10 year old dog's. That said, I put him on Hill's T/D (tartar/dental) for the past 2 months and that did wonders! His molars are super clean and there is a trace of tartar on the canines (where they don't chew). He does not do well with brushing so I have him on a supplement called Plaque Off. The vet said it takes approx. 3 weeks to see the results of Plaque Off. I'll hold off judging until then. You can Google that product and the pricing is reasonable.

But first, I'd definitely try the T/D from Hill's.

Kansas K9
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 05:58 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: Richard Seward


But first, I'd definitely try the T/D from Hill's.

Kansas K9


Top 8 Ingredients in Hill's Prescription Diet t/d Canine Original Bites Dry Food

Brewers rice: Cheap source of protein, waste product of brewers industry. Indicates poor quality white rice which can cause diabetes in dogs.

Ground whole grain corn: Contains all nutrients of corn but indicates the use of feed-grade (old, moldy), not human-grade (healthier, fresher), can cause allergies, weight gain, blood sugar imbalances.

Chicken by-product meal: Ground up carcasses, internal organs, beaks, feet. Concentrated.

Powdered cellulose: Suspected to include recycled cardboard.

Pork fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid): Can be rancid or 4-D (dead, dying, disabled, diseased) regardless of natural Vitamin E and C preservatives. Misleading.

Soybean mill run: This is the sweepings off the floor-cheap filler, poor source of protein.

Dried egg product: Cheap source of protein, waste product of egg industry, free of shell.

Chicken liver flavor: Poor quality of flavor additive, artificial flavors can be carcinogenic.



GROSSSSSSSSS!!!!! Totally inadequate nutrition.
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 06:02 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Tim- here is the water additive my vet uses, and recommends. She's a very strong believer in regular dental work, and supports this product.

http://www.virbacvet.com/cet/products/category/water_additives/
Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:18 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
That chem uses Xylitol which has a pretty good track record in human dental care. +

On the mechanical side, to get some scraping action on the canines, I've been thinking of just cutting a whole chicken in half and letting him gnaw his way through it. Not every day of course, but maybe 2 or 3 times a month.

Are there other gnawing options that can work the canines?
Joyce Salazar
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:27 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
I thought that Xylitol was toxic to dogs? But then again, Virbac wouldn't put something in there that would be toxic,right?

I have heard to keep sugar free gum away from dogs, because it could be toxic.... Connie, where are you? smiley for :grin:

Ok, I just found this hmmm, wonder why Virbac has this in their product?
http://vetmedicine.about.com/od/toxicology/qt/xylitol_tox.htm

Very conflicting info, I don't get it?
read down where it says http://vetmedicine.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=vetmedicine&cdn=homegarden&tm=6&f=00&tt=13&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//www2.aspca.org/site/DocServer/vetm0207f_095-100_.pdf%3FdocID%3D10462

Sharon Empson
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:43 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
It is toxic to dogs, i wouldn't use it. I had a bad incident about 8 months ago with my dog who almost died. Talking with the vet they told me sugarless gum with this ingredient Xylitol will at the least make your dog sick, at the worst, kill them. it is bad, I would not use it. sharon
Sharon Empson
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:45 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
I love the picture of your collie. I used to have 3 collies, I just love collies.
I have been looking for remedies too. Like this thread.
Sharon
Konnie Hein
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:46 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
According to the makers of that product:

http://www.virbacvet.com/images/resources/detailers/AquaDent_MiniDetailer.pdf

"Based on published studies of xylitol toxicity in
dogs and the APCC’s (Animal Poison Control Center)
experience, proper use of this product (according
to label directions) should not present a risk of
hypoglycemia in dogs. In addition, no significant
hepatic toxicity would be expected either."
Eric K. Dunayer, MS, VMD, DABT; Risk Assessment of Xylitol in Dogs and Cats, APCC-2006

Interesting.
Sharon Empson
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:46 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Does it have any physical side effects? Taken internally, what are the ingredients.
Love, sharon
Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:47 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
The wiki on Zylitol mentions toxicity and dogs but I could not make heads or tails out of the dosage per Kg that is of concern.
Sharon Empson
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:47 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Oh i thought it was something you put in their food. never mind.
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:51 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Interesting Joyce. I hadn't thought about THAT! Virbac- whats up...? I'd assume in the concentration if you follow the directions would be safe, but who knows. I'll have to call the vet tomorrow, and see what HER explanation for that it.

And yes, where is Connie? I'd like to know her thoughts!

edit- whoops. Hadn't refreshed my browser. A bunch of posts since i wrote this.

Edited by Kelly Byrd (12/07/2010 08:52 PM)
Edit reason: didn't refresh- old, whoops.
Connie Sutherland
(Moderator)
12/07/2010 08:54 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: tim curtis
The wiki on Zylitol mentions toxicity and dogs but I could not make heads or tails out of the dosage per Kg that is of concern.


I personally would not use a product with Xylitol for a dog.

However: "What about Xylitol Containing Mouthwashes for Pets?

The oral health benefits of xylitol do seem to hold true for dogs if appropriately low doses of xylitol are used. A product called Aquadent has been marketed for canine oral care, specifically for dogs that do not tolerate other methods of dental home care. This product is mixed in drinking water to provide antibacterial benefits. It comes in a 500cc (half liter) bottle that contains a total of 2.5 grams of xylitol as well as in small packets. If one follows the dosing instructions on the bottle or packet, there should be no problems.

Trouble could occur if there are animals of different sizes drinking from the same water bowl (one should dose for the smallest animal to use the bowl to be sure overdose is not possible). A dog finding the bottle and chewing it up, drinking a substantial quantity of the undiluted product could easily be poisoned depending on the dog's size."



Two Deadly Effects of Xylitol

Hypoglycemia
In the canine body, the pancreas confuses xylitol with real sugar and releases insulin to store the "sugar." The problem is that xylitol does not offer the extra calories of sugar and the rush of insulin only serves to remove the real sugar from the circulation. Blood sugar levels plummet resulting in weakness, disorientation, tremors, and potentially seizures.

It does not take many sticks of gum to poison a dog, especially a small dog (see below for toxic doses). Symptoms typically begin within 30 minutes and can last for more than 12 hours. Vomiting and diarrhea may also occur.

Hepatic Necrosis
The other reaction associated with xylitol in the canine body is actual destruction of liver tissue. How this happens remains unknown but the doses of xylitol required to produce this effect are much higher than the hypoglycemic doses described above. Signs take longer to show up (typically 8-12 hours) and surprisingly not all dogs that experience hepatic necrosis, will have experienced hypoglycemia first. A lucky dog experiences only temporary illness but alternatively, a complete and acute liver failure can result with death following. Internal hemorrhage and inability of blood to clot is commonly involved.

How Much Xylitol Is Dangerous?

The hypoglycemic dose of xylitol for dogs is considered to be approximately 0.1 grams per kilogram of body weight (about 0.045 grams per pound). A typical stick of gum contains 0.3 to 0.4 grams of xylitol, which means that a 10 lb dog could be poisoned by as little as a stick and a half of gum.

The dose to cause hepatic necrosis is 1 gram per kilogram of body weight, about ten times more than the above dose. In the example above, the 10 lb dog would have to find an unopened package of gum and eat it for liver destruction to occur."

All from veterinarypartner.com at http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=2875&S=1&SourceID=42


Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 08:56 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Thanks Connie!!!! smiley for :D
Joyce Salazar
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 09:02 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
There is enough compelling info in there for me to want to stay away from any amount of xylitol. Thanks Connie. smiley for ;)
Betty Landercasp
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 09:40 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Some dogs will allow you to do a little scraping on their teeth with a dental scaler.
One tooth at a time, careful not to nick the gum. Some show dog folks do this.



Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
12/07/2010 09:42 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Yes indeed, thanks Connie!

So any thoughts on gnawing options for scraping the canine teeth, short of a whole carcass as Michael W alluded to earlier, or my half-chicken idea?
Angie Stark
(Webboard User)
12/08/2010 07:45 AM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
What about this stuff...anybody ever tried it? http://www.wysong.net/products/dentatreat-dog-cat-supplement.php

Ingredients: A special blend of Dental-Active Natural Cheeses, Trona Minerals, Calcium Lactate, Aloe Vera, Potassium Citrate, Direct Fed Microbe Cultures (Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus acidophilus, bifidus, and salivarius), Milk Calcium, Apple Polyphenols, Natural Enzymes, Wysong Whole Salt™, Fructooligosaccharides, Chromium Yeast, Isolated Milk Proteins (including Lactoferrin and Lactoperoxidase).
jenn verrier
(Webboard User)
12/08/2010 08:42 AM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
I thought greenies were supposed to be pretty good for dogs teeth too? I have this problem with my dog too, because she does NOT like her teeth brushed, etc. I have been using dental cleaning pads lately though that I got from dr. fosters because she seems to tolerate it a little more. i also have petzlife but she hates it. i take her to get a cleaning once x year, but am trying to find something to use in between. she's not a chewer, and does not care for bones/rawhide, but does seem to like greenies at least.
Connie Sutherland
(Moderator)
12/08/2010 10:36 AM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: jenn verrier
I have this problem with my dog too, because she does NOT like her teeth brushed, etc.


Teeth care can be desensitized like like any "procedure." Somewhere here I described ear- and eye-care desensitizing with marker work .... I'll see if I can find it.

But number one is: Do one tooth, or one surface of one tooth. Use chicken or other toothpaste he loves. Done! Reward! Don't try to start with a whole mouthful at once.

eta
You might want to plug into "search" (over on the left, "search Leerburg.com," in this particular case, rather than the upper right "search") the word greenies.

Edited by Connie Sutherland (12/08/2010 10:37 AM)
Edit reason: eta
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/08/2010 11:08 AM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Ahhhaahah, I was wondering what you were going to say to the greenies Connie! smiley for :)

Greenies have LOTS of scary things happen with them, bowel obstruction is one. Scary stuff. I really strongly suggest doing some research on Greenies before giving your dog another.
Cindy Shepard
(Webboard User)
12/08/2010 02:32 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Back in the 70's I had father-in-law who was a dentist and taught me how to scale teeth with a dental tool.
I have since scaled the teeth of every dog I have owned since then on a regular basis (3-4 times a year) and every one had perfectly clean teeth their whole lives - even on a kibble diet and even some chihuahuas who had all kinds of weirdnesses with their teeth.

I have also scaled my own teeth for all those decades ... it's easy ... and have not paid a dentist to do it since. I honestly don't understand why it is not as common as tooth brushing to do yourself.
Just like with veterinarians, it's all about pretending to have knowledge or skills that the average person can't understand and charging them to dispense it . . .
Ok, I won't get into a rant here smiley for :) But I highly recommend self tooth scaling for your dogs!
Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
12/09/2010 07:47 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
It seems that no matter how you look at it, tarter is just one of those things that is best removed by mechanical means i.e., scraping. Either natural scraping by chewing through bones or by human hand using a tool...

Cindy - Could I use the same tool that my dentist uses or is there a special tool for dogs?

Betty Landercasp
(Webboard User)
12/09/2010 08:55 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
I'm sure you can buy a dental scaler on the internet. The only thing is, you need to put quite a little force on to pull the tarter down and off, and it's easy to slip and hit the bottom gum. Might be best to have the dog hold a washcloth in his mouth, and then practice on the upper canine first. It is not painful, but they don't like it
(who likes dental work!)
steve strom
(Webboard User)
12/09/2010 09:13 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
They sell them at dog shows or places like Foster & Smith.
http://pet-supplies.drsfostersmith.com/search?af=type%3Aproduct&view=grid&w=tooth%20scaler&visitorID=&cartcount=0&wishcount=0&subtotal=0.00
I push away from the gum, if that makes sense, rather then pull that direction. I can control it better so it doesnt slip like Betty pointed out.
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/09/2010 09:31 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Dentals are my favorite thing to do when I'm working as a vet tech. That and plucking ears. It's SOOO rewarding to see the difference!
Elaine Haynes
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 03:43 AM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: Kelly Byrd
In addition to what everyone else said- in my experience Collies are known for less then desirable teeth. smiley for :( My last boss bred, and I read a fair amount about the breed/learned a lot from her, and it seems pretty prevalent.

How old is Brodie?


i can vouch for that! I had 3 Collies and their teeth are definitely a weak point. In Fact that was what got me started researching and eventually going with a raw diet.
Connie Sutherland
(Moderator)
12/10/2010 09:47 AM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
I never knew that. Are there other bad-teeth breeds?

(I already know about Pugs, but that's more from the crowded flat-face mouth and overlapping.)
Mary Lynne Hooey
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 12:19 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
This is an interesting thread. I just called a few vets (London, Ontario)to get an estimate on cleaning plaque off my dog's teeth.
Only one would give me an estimate over the phone, without seeing my dog. They charge $39.00 to see him. They all would put the dog under a general anesthetic and with IV fluid and blood tests (88 lb. dog)...it only costs $900.00!

I was told by my vet some years ago, that the dog must be put under and a dam is used to collect the plaque, because the bacteria is very harmful if swallowed. Now they are saying it's because the dog won't stay still.

I'll investigate the suggestions noted here, to prevent my dog getting stains. Thanks for the info.
Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 01:01 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: Betty Landercasp
I'm sure you can buy a dental scaler on the internet. The only thing is, you need to put quite a little force on to pull the tarter down and off, and it's easy to slip and hit the bottom gum. Might be best to have the dog hold a washcloth in his mouth, and then practice on the upper canine first. It is not painful, but they don't like it
(who likes dental work!)

I took your earlier suggestion, and while Brodie was napping in front of the TV, I took my fingernail and scraped a bit on one of the canines. The brown stuff is not really a stain, its like a material coating, and its adheared quite strongly to the tooth.

I can see why it takes a metal scraper to get it off.

Is there also a tool that uses a water jet (or something)?

I seem to remember a youtube video that showed a tech using a tool to clean a dogs teeth and it looked like the tool was emitting water.
Tim Curtis
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 01:02 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: steve strom
They sell them at dog shows or places like Foster & Smith.
http://pet-supplies.drsfostersmith.com/search?af=type%3Aproduct&view=grid&w=tooth%20scaler&visitorID=&cartcount=0&wishcount=0&subtotal=0.00
I push away from the gum, if that makes sense, rather then pull that direction. I can control it better so it doesnt slip like Betty pointed out.

Thanks for the link Steve.
Cindy Shepard
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 02:16 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: connie sutherland
I never knew that. Are there other bad-teeth breeds?

(I already know about Pugs, but that's more from the crowded flat-face mouth and overlapping.)


I find that Chihuahuas have "weak" teeth and gums - teeth seem to get loose and fall out easily on some.
That being said, one of my tiny chi's had never lost a bunch of his baby teeth - the adult teeth came in and crowded the baby canines aside and some molars just formed a double row.

I regularly scaled this dogs teeth and he kept all of them until he died at age 18.

I have never had a problem teaching dogs to stay still while scaling and with my new dog (MinPIn) I'm using markers just like with dremeling her nails.

Start out with just handling her mouth and lips a lot marking and rewarding all along. Pulling the lips back far enough to reach the molars is the least pleasant for them, so do a lot of that. Then just touching the teeth with the tool, then mild scraping etc. etc. Start at the gum line and pull downwards (you can nudge the gum up a bit with the back of the tool).

Little dogs I hold in my lap, big dogs I teach to lie down on their sides on the floor sometimes with their head in my lap.

I never paid much attention as to where the plaque ends up, but if you keep up with the task there isn't enough of it (if any) to worry about the dog ingesting IMO.
Connie Sutherland
(Moderator)
12/10/2010 02:24 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
"I have never had a problem teaching dogs to stay still while scaling and with my new dog (MinPIn) I'm using markers just like with dremeling her nails. "


Just want to add that marker work to desensitize dogs to "procedures," and especially of the head/face and paws, is work that no owner will regret doing (and the vet will thank them too).

The time to do it is before there is an eye injury, ear infection, etc.

Tooth-brushing is a good place to start. I do one front tooth, praise and treat. Probably take a week (average) to work up to doing the whole thing, but it's all stress-free and permanent.
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 05:12 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: Mary Lynne Hooey
This is an interesting thread. I just called a few vets (London, Ontario)to get an estimate on cleaning plaque off my dog's teeth.
Only one would give me an estimate over the phone, without seeing my dog. They charge $39.00 to see him. They all would put the dog under a general anesthetic and with IV fluid and blood tests (88 lb. dog)...it only costs $900.00!

I was told by my vet some years ago, that the dog must be put under and a dam is used to collect the plaque, because the bacteria is very harmful if swallowed. Now they are saying it's because the dog won't stay still.

I'll investigate the suggestions noted here, to prevent my dog getting stains. Thanks for the info.


Estimates are hard with dentals, especially over the phone if they don't know your pet... it can vary on the size and age of the dog. Individual plaque buildup can really vary, and you never really know till you get in there if you'll need any extractions or not.

Every vet I've ever worked for has put a dog under full anesthesia. An IV Catheter is ALWAYS a good idea when anesthesia is used, but some vets only insist on it for pets over 5. (I'd never put a personal dog under without one though.) Depending on the age of the dog, some vets may require yearly blood work prior to anesthesia. (again, generally 5 and up) It's pretty good practice to get bloodwork on a young healthy dog at least once though, so you have a baseline measure for your particular dog if anything should ever go wrong.

A dental scale and polish, with IV Cath and blood work can run anywhere from $300(small, young dog with nice teeth)-$700(big old dog, lots of buildup) dollars in my area. More of course, if the work takes longer then an hour (the general time allowed for a dental, price goes up after that). More if they find a cavity, or tooth that needs to be pulled.

Melissa Thom
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 05:16 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Often times there is a special in Feb on dentals. Here the special is the works for $85
Betty Landercasp
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 05:45 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
Wow, that's a ton of money for a dental. (900.00)
We always had the dentals under gas anaesthesia for dental work, always intubated, as Kelly said, always an IV line(catheter) in place. Back in the day $150. was a lot for a dental, but we didn't have a polishing device, we used -- get ready--Ajax on a cotton swab to polish the teeth after the scraping. That was of course rinsed off.
Some vets will allow you not to have the pre-anaesthesia blood work if you will sign a waiver that if the dog dies under anaesthesia you will not hold them responsible for the death.
Kelly Byrd
(Webboard User)
12/10/2010 09:18 PM
Re: Removing brown stains from teeth.
 Quote: Betty Landercasp
Wow, that's a ton of money for a dental. (900.00)

we didn't have a polishing device, we used -- get ready--Ajax on a cotton swab to polish the teeth after the scraping. That was of course rinsed off.
Some vets will allow you not to have the pre-anaesthesia blood work if you will sign a waiver that if the dog dies under anaesthesia you will not hold them responsible for the death.

$900 seems steep. I thought the $700 bill I saw was crazy, but it was on a old (14?) poodle with NASSSTTTYYYY teeth. Now that I think of it, I've seen a lot of Poodles with above average plaque on the teeth. Maybe they are another breed like collies? (I'm purely guessing here- I KNOW collies are known for it, I dunno about Poodles)

Ajax!! LOL. Thats awesome.

Our vet will allow you to bypass BW on young dogs signing that waiver, but only on dogs under 7. If they are 7 and up, she'll refer you to someone else because she won't do it w/o BW.