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Leerburg Dog Training Blog

The best source for dog training news, tricks and treats, right from world class leaders in dog training.

The best source for dog training news, tricks and treats, right from world class leaders in dog training.
4 Photography Tips for Improving Your Dog Portraits

4 Photography Tips for Improving Your Dog Portraits

Today, more pictures are taken every 2 minutes than all of the pictures taken throughout the 19th century. Most of us carry a camera on us everywhere we go in the form of a cellphone. While some of these tips are geared more towards those shooting with DSLR camera, those who simply have a smartphone will be able to benefit as well. While gear is certainly important, you’re understanding of how to use it is what matters most.  Here are a few tips for you to better use your camera and capture your dogs best moments.

1 – Shoot in the Shade

Overcast days are excellent for portraits of any kind, including dog portraits. The clouds act as a giant diffuser and help us eliminate the harsh sunlight. If you are like me and live in an area where cloudy days are less common (Scottsdale, AZ), consider finding a large patch of shade where you can set up your dog or learn to shoot at sunrise and sunset. Sunrise and sunset shots are much more difficult but can produce beautiful images.

Stella – Overcast Morning

Faiza – Sunset

2  – Focus on the Eyes

When we take photos of dogs or humans, we almost always want the eyes to be the focal point of the image. The eyes always tell us the biggest story in a picture. If you’re shooting with a camera capable of capturing a shallow depth of field, this will be one of the most important (and difficult) skills you develop.

Bowie

3 – Get Low

Consider shooting from your knees or, my favorite, on your stomach especially with smaller dogs. This allows us to look straight into their eyes and gives the dog a stronger presence in the photo.

Sophie

4 – Train your Dog

I’ve been fortunate to shoot some of the most well trained dogs you can imagine and it makes my job as the photographer so much easier. If you’re out shooting your own dogs, take food with, be patient and think of it as a training session. I bring food along to my sessions with clients (and my own dogs!) which essentially turn into training sessions as well.

Tanzi

Comments

  1. Ed Frawley
    Ed Frawley
    April 27, 2017

    Ryan took the picture of Cindy’s dog Maybe (running towards the camera) that we are using for the Blog Photo.

    He has also had photos he took be featured as the cover photo for Leerburg’s catalog. He is really really a gifted photographer. I hope he posts more blog posts of taking dog pictures.

  2. Avatar
    Ro Bastacky
    April 27, 2017

    Nice article Ryan Maciej!

  3. Avatar
    Ro Bastacky
    April 27, 2017

    Nice article Ryan Maciej!
    Love your photos.

  4. Avatar
    Luc
    April 28, 2017

    Thank you for the article. Great tips for someone like me who loves to take pictures of my clients dogs to showcase to their owners what their stay has been.

  5. Avatar
    Debi Gallino
    June 22, 2017

    Awesome photos and tips! I will try them out if I can get my two GSDs to sit still long enough – squirrel!

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