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Leerburg Streaming Videos Testimonial

Streaming Videos Testimonial

Streaming Videos Testimonial


February 7, 2011

Dear Cindy,

Just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed the agility video included in today's newsletter. Your sister appears to be doing very well with her dog. The handler in the wheelchair has such a rapport with his dog, it was amazing. 

We do agility with our German Shepherd. At last year's trial, there was a handler who has Parkinson's with a Border Collie. He, too, had a wonderful connection with his dog and did a great job. After he finished, all the other handlers and the spectators gave him a standing ovation. 

Agility is such fun. Good exercise, physical and mental, for both dog and handler. Thank you for sharing the video. 

Patricia
Chicago


October 4, 2010

Ed,

These videos that you send out in you news letter are incredible! I really want to tell you that I appreciate the info that you put out there.  Keep up the good work. I’ve ordered several of the Ellis videos, and I’ve enhanced my knowledge base a hundred fold. 

Thanks again,
Bob


September 10, 2010

Cindy-

I love the newsletter! I've trained in many places, but right now I live in a town with very few serious dog people & very few dog activities. So I appreciate newsletters like yours help to fill the gap.  

I'm 45 & worked with dogs all my life. I have three dogs in the house, one is a Malinois, the second Malinois I've owned.

I caught your comment at the end of one video- "such a pain in the A$$!"; it was a little surprising. I wouldn't go as far as Barbara - that it dropped your credibility. But you may want to remember who is in your audience, & who you want to attract. I would think anyone taking their time to read you newsletter is a serious trainer or having problems with a serious dog. There are so many of us that would give our right arm for a puppy like that, I thought the comment sounded like you didn't appreciate what you have.

Thanks for all you do!

Tish


September 9, 2010

I just read the comment from Barbara regarding Cindy saying that Endy was a PITA.  I particulary enjoyed both Cindy's and Ed's responses.

I have a 15 month old Old English Sheepdog - she's 75 lbs. but I still call her a puppy. She is the 10th OES that we have owned - some from puppies and some from rescues at various ages from 10 months to 5 years.  So I am very familiar with this breed.

This "puppy" is DEFINITELY a high drive dog and is different from any of my other Sheepdogs. I have worked very hard for the last year training her.  I have had her in beginner and intermediate obedience classes with really good trainers and have worked with her every day.  I have several of your videos including Basic Dog Obedience, Dealing with Dominant & Aggressive Dogs and Remote Collar Training.  I have found them to be of immense help with training this PITA puppy!!

My nickname for her is "Butt Head"!- and I call her this with absolute love and humor (and it has taken a while to get to the humor part).

So --- I can definitely relate to Cindy and Endy. 

Just wanted you to know that there are people out there who do not give up on these "hard" dogs. Thanks for all of your help.

Sandy


September 9, 2010

I loved the comment!  I’m currently raising the most talented GSD puppy I may ever own and he can be a royal PITA – - until you get out on the training field.  He knows what he was bred to do and so do I.

Very truly yours,
Jackie


September 9, 2010

Hi,

I was just reading the Leerburg newsletter and came across the comment from another reader about you calling Endy a PITA. I don't understand this reader at all - when I watched this video I laughed at your comment, because I have a high drive puppy that drives me crazy sometimes and is also a PITA. But that doesn't mean that I love him any less or that he isn't a joy to work with - he's just a handful!

I think you're an amazing trainer and are incredible with your dogs. You certainly haven't lost any respect with me and I think it's great that you can laugh at Endy's challenging moments!

Thanks for sharing the training videos of Endy!

Jenn


September 9, 2010

Hi Cindy,

I was reading the newsletter today (one of my favorites) and saw the comment about the Endy bubbles video. I have to tell you that I had the exact opposite reaction and it actually made me laugh out loud. I also have a PITA dog and it has been a challenging 6 years. I also would not have it any other way. I liked to hear that it isn't as easy as it looks (even for you) working with such a high drive pup. You guys have helped me so many times with my PITA when I get stuck. He is such a wonderful dog and every mistake or challenge that I have gone through with him have made me so much better as a trainer. I run a walk with some of my clients every week and it seems someone always makes a comment about how nice it is to have such a well-behaved dog and how lucky I am. I just smile and point to my dog and say "That right there is a whole lot of work!"

You guys are awesome!
Tracy


September 9, 2010

Cindy,

I look forward to and read Leerburg's newsletters with great enjoyment and greatly value the advice and encouragement you provide to dog owners. I had to laugh at the comment about you calling Endy a pain in the A$$... I too own one of those, a little Boston Terrorist, and I even thought about changing her name to PITA (Peeta). The fact is that the reason she is a PITA is that she is so darned smart, and has a mind of her own. Once I learned to accept her as she is and train accordingly life around here got lots easier... but there are still many PITA days and that's what makes us love her. Keep enjoying Endy.

Val


September 7, 2010

YAY….to Cindy, Endy and Ed…!

WOW… what an amazing, energy packed and awesome video clip about training, engagement, learning, obedience and fun… so impressed with all of you! Cindy, you are such an amazing trainer – your hand gestures are about as quick as that little “pistol” pup of a girl named “Endy.” So impressive, both of you… lightning speed coming from both of you… Endy would have been such a challenge for the majority of dog owners but in the proper hands she will undoubtedly learn so much more than the average bear… good work on the “bubbles” fun… it just shows  how endless, creative and fun learning can be for both handler and dog.

A *special* thanks to Ed for turning up the volume and letting us hear what is going on between Cindy and Endy. I was enthralled with all of the interaction and I like your new sweeping or turning liner notes so we can be prepared for what is about to happen and yet we can still listen in… an outstanding video clip! I am going to go back and watch it again.

Keep sending those delicious videos of that Endy girl, she is just a ball of fire… and Cindy is one of the best trainers I have ever seen. I love watching them work, together.

Keep up the good work!

Storm


August 10, 2010

Dear Ed and Cindy,

I am not sure which made me chuckle more, the video of your new pup going and going and going, or the letter about your "torture" equipment. I am 56 years old and in the past have trained/raised two Brittany's, a number of Golden Retrievers (one for hunting trials), two litters of puppies, and various mixed breeds - I know what it takes to raise a dog.  However, nothing prepared me for my current pal, Lacie, an almost two year old Brittany that I got as a rescue at 9 months. She had already been through THREE households!  You would think that would raise a red flag.

At any rate, if I had not found your site I am sure our cat would be dead and Lacie would be in her 5th or 6th placement or been euthanized.  She is extremely high drive, stubborn, and very energetic. AND..... she is now becoming obedient, funny and fun to be with, pays attention, is in outstanding health, and catches everyones eye wherever I take her. We go very early to the large dog park near us and she can run (and boy can she run!) to her hearts' content because there are rarely dogs there at 6am and the few that are are mostly fixated on chasing their tennis ball. Lacie is a hunting dog and runs for the pure joy of running and pointing at birds/squirrels. All this because I got over my issues with crates and e-collars and once purchased, along with a number of your videos, and many hours spent working on pack structure (which never ends) I cannot even begin to tell you how my life with Lacie changed. 

We are not totally there but I can see a light at the end of the tunnel. Keep up the good work. I have attached a couple photos, doesn't she look calm?

Rebecca


August 2, 2010

Hi Guys!

Just watched the video. Endy is a riot! She reminded me so much of my puppy. Dutch is a Shephard/Rottie mix now 10 months old. To say he is a high drive pup is an understatement! Ed is spot-on in saying that you have to be totally prepared to have a high energy puppy. I didn’t realize the amount of patience and energy that it was going to take to raise Dutch. I am in my 40’s and not particularly athletic. Due to not getting as much exercise as he should and being crated for the better part of the day when I’m at work Dutch can be very destructive in the house. He tore the door off of his crate and ate my couch…literally, ATE the couch! I was worried not only for the destruction caused to the house but also that he may have ingested something that could make him really ill. I seriously thought about re-homing Dutch, but I made the commitment to adopt him and I’m not one of these people who thinks that pets are disposable so I’m making some adjustments, having someone walk him once during the day and my niece who is a runner comes by and takes him for a run with her in the evening in addition to his walks in the morning with me. A tired Dutch is a happy Dutch! I say all this to say that when choosing a puppy it is absolutely true that you need to pick a breed that is going to be a good match for you as far as energy level goes. You need to be sure that you have the time and wherewithal to deal with a pup, because I agree with Ed 100% having a pup is like having a hyper two year old. You need to be sure you’re ready and able to make that commitment. Keep up all the good work guys, and best of luck with Endy!

Lisa 


August 2, 2010

Hi Guys!

Just watched the video "So You Think You Want a High Drive Puppy." Endy is a riot! She reminded me so much of my puppy. Dutch is a Shephard/Rottie mix now 10 months old. To say he is a high drive pup is an understatement! Ed is spot-on in saying that you have to be totally prepared to have a high energy puppy. I didn’t realize the amount of patience and energy that it was going to take to raise Dutch. I am in my 40’s and not particularly athletic. Due to not getting as much exercise as he should and being crated for the better part of the day when I’m at work Dutch can be very destructive in the house. He tore the door off of his crate and ate my couch… literally, ATE the couch! I was worried not only for the destruction caused to the house but also that he may have ingested something that could make him really ill. I seriously thought about re-homing Dutch, but I made the commitment to adopt him and I’m not one of these people who thinks that pets are disposable so I’m making some adjustments, having someone walk him once during the day and my niece who is a runner comes by and takes him for a run with her in the evening in addition to his walks in the morning with me. A tired Dutch is a happy Dutch! I say all this to say that when choosing a puppy it is absolutely true that you need to pick a breed that is going to be a good match for you as far as energy level goes. You need to be sure that you have the time and wherewithal to deal with a pup, because I agree with Ed 100% having a pup is like having a hyper two year old. You need to be sure you’re ready and able to make that commitment. Keep up all the good work guys, and best of luck with Endy!

Lisa   


August 2, 2010

I had to write after I saw the high drive puppy video – that was our Polly (GSD) 2 years ago. I had NO idea what it meant to have a high drive dog. The only people who were thrilled to see her at 6 months were the trainers we finally found who wanted to keep her and were very disappointed to learn that she was already spayed. But 2 long years later we have the smartest, almost most completely well behaved, sweetest dog, that anyone could ever ask for. It took constant training – I went to “dog school” 3 - 4 times a week for over a year where I worked her with the support of a team of trainers who really knew what they were doing. I also own, and have watched repeatedly, every video you have produced. The turning point came when I finally watched Dealing with Dominant and Aggressive Dogs. Polly was about 15 months at that point. While we had made a great deal of progress I wasn’t committed to what it would take to get her into line. After watching, and really absorbing the message, we embarked on a 2 month intensive period where she did absolutely nothing without my say so. She was on a leash or e-collar at all times. She had to stay with me, down, quiet, unless I told her something else. Luckily I work at home so she could be out and around while this was going on. While she is well trained to a crate (one of the true blessings for us) I do not like to crate her except at night or when we are away. We have always given Polly lots of exercise, walks, playing fetch, training etc, and she eats a raw diet which keeps her lean and healthy. Our one remaining problem is that she is aggressive with other dogs. I think this is a combination problem born of not enough socialization as a small pup, a few bad incidents with other dogs, and my failure to correct her effectively in these situations. She is actually fine at dog school where all the dogs are well behaved and she knows her place. Our problem is walking where there are other dogs; she just strikes out and refuses to be indifferent. Because she is so reactive she brings out the worst in other dogs… and as I have discovered many other dogs are very poorly behaved.  But this is the final frontier and I know we will conquer it. So I agree with you, most people have no idea what they are getting into with a high drive dog. Having said that I am already thinking about when we might get another puppy; I am almost ready to start again! Thanks for all your help and support you have the best information and are just a fabulous resource for dog lovers.

I attached a picture – thought you’d like seeing her in one of her favorite poses.

Kathe


August 2, 2010

Cindy

I just finished watching the video "Teaching Your Puppy to Swim." What a tremendous service to anyone who has ever wondered how to introduce their dog to water and how to teach them to swim. Our Lab pretty much figured it out on her own. Our Yorkshire Terrier puppy is OK with getting about belly deep and then steps back. I had been wondering how to get her past that, and knew I needed to actually get in the water with her. However, I've been unsure as to the process to follow. It appears that proceeding slowly, and patience with the puppy's comfort level is the key. Thanks for your newsletters and the valuable learning information they always contain.

Milton

August 1, 2010

I have been involved in Malinois Rescue for about 8 years now, and I must say I love your High Drive Puppy Video. We would love to make that video a requirement for ALL new Malinois Adopters:-)  I get those young dogs out of the shelters ALL the time. Mostly when they are 7 months-1 year old. I had an owner turn in once that told me the dog was the most "disrespectful" dog he had ever had! I politely told him that respect is something that is earned... Come to find out, this working dog was sold in a petstore!

Thank you so much for for being so blunt and relating those high-drive puppies to 2 year olds! My husband owns quite a bit of your DVDs and respects your training and philosophies quite a bit, as do many working people we know. It was great to see this video.

Far too many people think that getting a high drive puppy versus a rescued young Malinois (1-3 years old) is much better. Maybe if they saw your video they would realize that it's not all cute and fun!

Thanks again for your wonderful work!

Maryfrances


July 26, 2010

Cindy: 

Just watched your puppy-swimming video. My you have great patience...

I'm writing to tell you that 9 years ago, I had just brought home a 12 week old GSD from a kennel in CA. Having had fears of a dog drowning in the pool, I emailed Ed. He gave me, via email, step by step instructions. I followed the instructions and soon had a puppy who "owned" the pool. She has owned it for her 9 years. Even when I don't move quickly enough for her she'll flip a frisbee into the pool and go in and retrieve it.

I SO appreciate the wonderful help received. I'm not sure if I'll get another puppy (figure I have a good three or more years with the dog I have now) and I don't think I'll get a puppy in my 80's... maybe adopt an older GSD who just needs a good home. Unfortunately, the shelters are full of them now - too many people can no longer feed them and are dumping them. I cry just thinking about it and wish I had the property, funds, and time to adopt a bunch.

Back to the point: you folks sure do great work. Sharing your knowledge and helping get dogs properly trained. Nothing like a well-trained dog to give joy, companionship, and protection -- mine have scared away a couple of sets of would-be intruders. I live close to the Mexican border here and home invasions are getting to be commonplace. 

Thanks again to Ed for his gracious help teaching my dog to swim 9 years ago.

Denne


July 19, 2010

Cindy,

Congrats on acquiring “Endy”… she is adorable. You must be “in love” all over again. I am envious but can see all of the hard work that goes into “puppy” raising. If she comes out anything like Rush, it will be well worth it.

I have all of the Michael Ellis videos (waiting for the retrieve disc to arrive) and many of the old Leerburg videos and I watch each and every streaming video you have on your site. I have to say that the clip of you and Endy that arrived in my email-box this morning was the *best* of them all. I was mesmerized watching you lead a 9 week old puppy like that. I am amazed… jaw on floor wonderful to witness. I am hoping this will be incorporated into the next video to come out of Leerburg… how to start the 1st steps of puppy training. It is not only heart-warming to watch but so informative as well. It goes against all of the previous information about waiting to train until they are months old. What non-sense... to wait. I cannot believe how well Endy is responding, already.
What a joy!

In the meantime, keep those video clips of you and Endy coming… or get Ed to complete a “puppy” training video for all of us novices. You make it look so easy… I know… it’s simple but NOT easy… all the best for you and Endy in the years to come!

Stormy


July 12, 2010

Cindy,

I've been getting your newsletter for about 6 months now and have really enjoyed watching the training videos of you and Rush. Watching your performance at the latest trial was something else though. What really came through to me was the wonderful feeling I got from your dog. He is so focused and HAPPY! He loves his job and is a true credit to his breeding and training. Congratulations.

Sincerely
Dawn


April 4, 2010

Dear Cindy and Ed,

I wanted to thank you for keeping the video on heat stroke available on your website. I live in Southeastern Wisconsin and we have had some very nice weather here so I took my dog out to play. Long winters and a rare warm spring day lead to a dog whose owner let him overdo play time. When I brought him in he was huffing like a freight train and was warmer than usual. I remembered the information in your newsletter and quickly looked up the video that you made. We applied cool washcloths constantly to his belly and chest and noticed a big difference in about 20 minutes. Maybe I erred on the side of caution but I have no regrets in my actions!!

Thank you ever so much for the information. I’m know in my case it may have been a lifesaver!!

Love your newsletter too!!

Kindest Regards,
Lisa


March 30, 2010

Hello Mr. Frawley,  

I had to write to let you know I thoroughly enjoyed the video on the newsletter I read this morning. It was about increasing speed in performance exercises. INCREDIBLE!!! More! More! More! I love the 'out of the box' thinking of Michael Ellis, and I love that you are capturing it on tape for all to see. You have made my job easier with my girls, and I wanted to thank you... without your site and insight I would have sent my first working dobe back to the breeder.... You have made her understandable to me. So much so, that I now have a second working dobe. I thank you.

-Susan

September 30, 2009

Hello,

I just had to write and tell you that the video (Rewarding the Stand for Exam) in the newsletter is wonderful. I have been grappling with the stand for exam, not being able to figure out how to train it properly. That short and sweet video is a PERFECT starting place. Thank you.

I am waiting for the next Leerburg/Ellis DVD to come out. Any idea when??? I have a 7 month pup and need the information as soon as possible... LOL I live out in the country - no helper for over 3+ hours away, and then it is only once in a while.

Again, thank you for your wonderful site.
-Susan

Ed's Response:

Susan,

Well you just made my day. :-)

I have 4 1/2 hours done on the tug DVD. I hope to finish the editing before Saturday. It takes 2 to 2 1/2 weeks to be sent off and pressed.

I am leaving for 2 weeks of filming with Michael in CA on Sunday so I am under the gun here.

I think the tug DVD is better than the food DVD.

Best Regards,
Ed


August 17, 2009

Good Morning,

I had to write to let you know how very pleased I am that you included the training video clip with Cindy and Rush in the last newsletter. I have a a 5 month working dobe pup, (schutzhund) that I am working with as well as my 3 year old dobe bitch. I was struggling with positions and keeping the front end in place when going from sit to stand to down or whatever. I did attend the Ellis seminar when he was in Albany, NY last month. It was wonderful. But I didn't see him talk about using a touch pad for the 'positions' (sit, stand and down) at that time. WHAT A PERFECT WAY TO GET CONSISTENTLY CORRECT POSITIONS!!! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU. I started to use the pad for 'touch' and eventually for the send away, as he teaches. I did order the new Ellis video, thank you for making it. HE is the best trainer I have worked with to date, I am a marker trainer anyway, and have been for quite a few years, Well 4 at least, because I was introduced to it with my first 'bred for working' dobe bitch who is now just over 3 years old. I can not wait until the Leerburg Ellis video comes, and have been searching your site in the meantime, to keep me 'on track' and to keep me from going crazy while waiting. LOL.

You have saved my relationship with my older dog, and have made my understanding of dogs and dog behavior grow tremendously. I almost gave up my 3 year old when she was just 5 months old, because I didn't understand her or what my part was in her life, and how to fulfill her potential. Your site saved us. Literally, I kept her only after finding your site and realizing you had answers that made sense and worked for us. (I actually sent her home back to the breeder at that age, but took her back after about a month of reading and finding your site). Thank you for making ours a wonderful relationship! If not for you and your staff and site, I would not have her with me now.

Thank You
-Susan


July 27, 2009

Cindy and Ed:

I just ordered Training Dogs with Food with Michael Ellis. I have never written a testimonial to anyone before but I wanted to say that the Michael Ellis training videos on your website the last few weeks are the best training videos, by far, that I’ve ever watched. Michael lays everything out in a way that is incredibly clear and easy to follow. I can hardly wait to get my new DVD and I am very grateful to all three of you for making the free streaming videos and the full-length DVDs available.

Regards,
Jackie


July 24, 2009

Cindy and Ed,

After reading this weeks newsletter I watched the video on heat stroke in dogs and realized that my dog may be suffering heat stroke every day! We play two ball every evening, yesterday it was 73 degrees.  We have limited our playtime to 10 minutes because one of the dogs begins to pant heavily after only a few minutes (she is really good at two ball).  Usually she gets into the baby pool as soon as we finish but yesterday I had emptied and cleaned it and had not refilled it yet.  I brought her in and took her temperature and found that is was a little over 105 so I started wetting her down in front of a fan.  Her temperature reduced pretty quickly but I realized that we have to reduce our play time more.  I guess some dogs are more prone to overheating, and I will be much more cautious now.  Thank you for all the great info.  When I found your site, a few years ago, it was an answer to my prayers, and saved me and my dogs. I have learned so much and I wish I had learned it before I got the dog! I have found that old people and dogs can learn new tricks. 

Beverly


July 20, 2009

Just a note of thanks --- I love ordering from you all--- quick, easy and the products are such quality. My recent order was received within a couple of days after the order was placed. This was not the first time I have ordered from Leerburg -- all other orders have been received the same -- Thank you again so much for providing me such a great service!

Sandie


July 20, 2009

Loved the streaming videos of Michael's lecture -- he's really terrific, isn't he? -- and looking forward to the DVDs.


July 7, 2009

Cindy & Ed,

There are tidbits in Michael’s lecture that have really helped me understand Marker Training better, and I am finally having some success with my puppy.

I have a very nice GSD puppy that I got took home at 7 weeks. I was very excited to get started with her using marker training (I have your latest video), but I was stumped when she did not show much food drive – not for hot dogs, roast beef, or even dried liver. Since she was a skinny puppy and a little underweight, I didn’t want to withhold food from her until she was older, so I just worked on pack structure and prey drive games. Now she is 18 weeks old, and has caught up with the other puppies (thanks to a raw food diet – her litter mates are all eating Royal Canin). I thought it was OK to let her get a little hungry and use some very tasty liver treats.

I realized from listening to Michael, that I really had to spend some time charging the “yes” marker, and there was no point in moving to the next step until she associated “Yes” with something good that she wanted.

It took two days of light feeding to get her hungry enough to really want the treats. Then I spent three days just charging the mark with her and working on my timing.

Yesterday and today I started with the hand touch. It is so much fun for me to see her brain working trying to figure out what I want, and finally getting it. Then she got very excited and started biting my hand instead of just touching it with her nose. I’m using “Try Again” as the withholding reward marker. She looked at me puzzled after she bit at my hand and got no “yes” and no treat, but I just said, “try again,” and after two more bites, she just touched with her nose, and I said “Yes” at just the right moment. I’ll spend the next few days getting some consistency, and then add the “touch” command.

I can’t wait for the next video clips and I just wanted to share with you how helpful they are. I’ll be looking for the full length video when you have that published.

Valerie
San Diego, CA


May 28, 2009

Hello,

Just wanted to tell you how cool (no pun here) it was for me to see your latest video clip on heat stroke. It was the answer to a question we've worried about for a year now. We have a golden retriever puppy who at one year exhibited that "drunken behavior" you described after taking a walk with my daughter. I'm supposing now that maybe our daughter unwillingly overdid it a bit (she is on the track team) and that our beautiful male golden was pooped and overheated when he began to stumble about! 

I immediately put him on the floor and just rubbed him gently and gave him water on his tongue but at the time I was thinking epilepsy instead of (doh!!!) the most obvious (but not to me) heat stroke! To think now that I could have helped him so much faster with a cooling water on the tummy or alcohol rub, makes me sad, but also very happy now to feel that I now know what to do in the event I ever see any dog in this situation! Thank you thank you for your wonderful sharing of this problem and for all the neat information we have found with you. I love your site!

All My Best,
Mary & Mason (pictured below)

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