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Leerburg Dog Training Q&A Archive Dogs and Children Q&A

Dogs and Children Q&A

Dogs and Children Q&A


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dog and baby

I try and answer every question I receive on dog training. I may often come across a little on the blunt side, (some may call it brash). That is because I consider myself an advocate for dogs and not dog handlers. I am an advocate for common sense dog training and not the latest fad that appears on the horizon. Good dog training is not rocket science. It's common sense.



  1. My Bichon Frise shows aggression to children. I am taking him to obedience classes at Pet Smart. This is not helping. What can I do?

  2. I have a 16 month old Cairn Terrier that has been aggressive to my 3 1/2 year old son. What can I do?

  3. Our 4 year old dog is protective of our new baby grandson, do you have any suggestions?

  4. My dog is showing aggression towards my young daughter. What would you suggest?

  5. We are having a baby in September and countless people have expressed concern over introducing the dog to the baby and visa versa. Is there a right vs. wrong way to introduce a dog?

  6. My pup is growling at my two young children and being very shy towards other dogs. Should I be as concerned as I am about this situation?

  7. Our 8 year old Chesapeake Bay Retriever bit our 1 1/2 yr old baby on her hand. My wife wants the dog to go, I don't know what to do.

  8. My dog is aggressive around toddlers, what should we do?

  9. When will our dog be able to be unsupervised with our cats and what videos do you recommend that explain how to introduce a baby to our dog?  I’m due to have our first child in a couple of weeks.

  10. My dogs are very spoiled and 5 months ago we had a baby. We've done everything wrong. Our male dog marks everything in the house, including the baby's belongings and yesterday he growled at the baby when his foot accidentally touched him. Will it make my dogs worse if I crate them?

  11. As life would have it, my wife and I recently had a wonderful unexpected surprise… a baby boy. In your experience, when do you know things are going to be alright and he will see this new baby like he sees our 12 year old?

  12. I have a 9 month old rott and when she was a puppy, about 3 months, she bit my daughter while eating a bone. Since then, my other daughter claims she bit her head and just tonight my other daughter was trying to hug the puppy and she said at first she bit her but then said she just scratched her face. What can I do to make sure this isn't really happening over and over again? Are me and my family over reacting and is she really just being a playful puppy or do I have a real problem?


Question:

Ed,

Thank you for your site. The information that it contains has been helpful in trying to figure out what to do with my dog, Rocky. Rocky is a 7 year old Australian Shepard that we have had since he was 9 weeks old. He has been a great dog with a great personality. He never barks unless some comes near the house or if he and I are playing. He has always been very "happy" around people even children. There are 10 grandchildren on my wife's side of the family of which 7 of them have spent a good deal of time around Rocky over the last 5 - 6 years with no problems at all; not even a growl. Today he bit my 2 year old daughter whom he always been around and has allowed her to play with him without incident in the past. We do not know the circumstances of what happened as we were not in the room at the moment of the bite. All we know is that Rocky was lying on the floor, which is normal, and all I can figure is that she fell on him and he turn and bit her leg. One tooth did break the skin, but the was little, to no blood.

We really love our dog and definitely want to keep him around, but we are afraid of what he might do if she were to fall on him again while he is sleeping. Any training suggestions that you might give would be greatly appreciated. The possibility of losing the dog would be devastating.

Thank You for your assistance.

Larry M.

Answer:

Get a dog crate and use it and keep better control of your 2 year old. I would not blame the dog for this. If he wanted to hurt her he would have. I would get pissed off too if I was sleeping and someone jumped on me, even if it were a 2 year old. This is a dog owner problem and not a dog problem. I don't have time to mince words here.

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QUESTION:

Mr. Frawley,

I hope you can help our family. We have a 16 mon. old cairn terrier male neutered at 6 mon. He is generally a good natured dog. We have had typical problems with house training, but generally he is a typical cairn.

Problem is with my 3 1/2 year old son. There seems to be some confusion as to who is higher in the pecking order. My son is very gentle with this dog, but when the pup was 4-5 mon. old he bit my boy in the face. He still bares the scar. Over the past year this dog has tried to nip him 4-5 times. This behavior was not provoked, usually its when my son Joshua comes up to me. Evidently, I am Toto's territory. I've watched Toto when my son comes around me and Toto is very guarded, very protective towards me. The other night my son was eating a donut and had finished it and came up to me when I was watching TV petting the dog next to me and Josh said his donut was "Mmmm" Toto took it as a growl and growled at Josh. Tonight when Josh came down stairs he walked past Toto with a toy and Toto was very guarded with his toy and then came and jumped next to me putting his toy behind him and watching Josh with ears pinned down on his head and very watchful. I put my hand on Toto's collar just to keep control over the situation.

This sounds weird too, but two of the incidents were when Josh was naked, once, as he stepped out of the tub and into a towel I was holding, Toto was sitting on the floor next to me and the second was when Josh was learning potty training and was waiting for clean underwear. Both times Toto jumped to bite his privates. Luckily, I grabbed the dog before he could do any damage. Could Toto have felt threatened in some way, I don't know...Josh is not allowed to be naked around the dog.

Toto also was the dickens to house train and occasionally does still mark. Typically Joshua's toys. . .

In the incidents I have witness Josh did nothing to provoke this dog, actually ignored him. He is leery of him since he was bit. Toto and Josh play, Toto licks his hand, they play ball. Go for walks on the leash around the house, typical boy and dog kinda thing. But on occasion things change. My question is how can I change this pecking order and make my almost four year old son more dominant.

A new thing is Toto has gotten yelled at more for dumb things like peeing on the floor, in the trash and he'll run to his kennel to hide. He does the head down scurry to the kennel thing and if he does something bad he knows it. He is looking at me more for approval of his actions now more than ever. Almost like he tests the waters, real submissive before he enters a room or jumps on the sofa. He is submissive to both me and my husband. He also looks at my daughter who is five as a protector, too. Likes to sit with her. As a pup I flipped him on his back alot, pulled on tails and ears just to help desensitize him to kids.

Joshua is the only one he does this with.

This is the second dog in our family that has done this. The first was a shelty/golden mix that after bottle raising as a pup and owning for 10 years, attacked my husband, who required 60 stitches. The dog I put down. I can't help but wonder if its something I am doing that is inspiring these dogs and even a cat to act this way (cat didn't bite, just was with me all the time. (I am also very close to my horses too) My animals seem to like me alot (obviously obsessively)

Thing is Toto may have to find a new home and I hate to have to do that, cairn's our not the easiest dog to sell, except to a cairn lover. . .

Any help you can give us would be appreciated. I have obedience trained 4 dogs over the years, even did some dog showing in 4-h and actually made it to state. A prof. trainer is pretty much out of the question, so your looking at her. . .if I can't change this behavior soon, he's going to have to go. I can see something is going to happen soon just by Toto's behavior and I can't have my boy getting hurt.

Thanks for reading. . .

Kim

ANSWER:

I am not really sure why you would keep this dog or if you do why it would ever be out of the dog crate when your child is in the house.

When I read this email I shake my head. This is 100% an owner problem and not a dog problem.

This dog is a dangerous dog to your child. Read the articles I have written:

1 -Preventing Dog Bites in Children

2- Dealing with the Dominant Dog

3- Read the article I wrote titled GROUND WORK TO BECOMING A PACK LEADER.

I am sorry but when I read emails like this I feel like I am talking to the wall because so many foolish things are going on.

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4. Question:

We have a wonderful, caring 4 year old male Belgian Sheepdog. I've done obedience training  with him professional trainers over time for general commands (heel, with me, etc.). He can be oversensitive to stimulus. He is great with adults and now is dealing with his first exposure to a young infant (our grandson). He is becoming quite protective as he darts at our other dog if he goes near the baby. He even darted toward me while I was shaking a rattle in front of baby's face. He was going directly toward the rattle but didn't touch me. I having been giving him a firm NO when he does this and sometime insist on down position.  He seems to be overprotective. He loves to lick the baby and nudge him to sniff and check him out. We never allow our Belgian near baby without supervision and after a couple of licks and greeting we tell him to leave it. Any suggestions?  I've been raised with GSD, so familiar  with the instinctive protectiveness.  Think our Belgian is over-reacting.  Hope our approach will not make this more so. We do say good down and good boy when he listens and "leaves it" (retreat). Thank you for any suggestions. 

Joanne

Answer:

Your dog isn’t being overprotective, he’s being obsessive.  I would stop allowing this behavior immediately.  Many people think a dog is being protective in a good way when in reality the dog is resource guarding the baby, as if the baby is one of HIS possessions.

I'd recommend reading our section on kids and dogs

Learn to use the search function (located in the left hand corner of every page on our website) Simply type in your search terms or key words and you will be directed to articles, question & answers, free streaming videos and posts on our forum.

Since you have good obedience control of your dog, I’d always demand he maintain a certain distance from the baby and NEVER allow him around the baby unsupervised, even for a moment. 


5. Question:

Hello,

I have sought help from numerous sources (too many to mention here), including my vet. I have one huge problem with our border collie, named Oreo, she is 7 yrs old, we've had her since she was 10 weeks old. She is a wonderful dog all the way around... for obedience, etc. no problems.

The problem is she is showing aggression towards our daughter who will be 4 yrs old in February. She used to be able to go and pet Oreo and help me feed her, etc. However over the last couple months her aggression is getting worse and worse. I've gone to the point that she is back in the kennel or tied to me with a leash or has to wear a muzzle in efforts to prevent her from biting my daughter. Oreo has even gone to the extent of preventing my daughter from getting on her own bed. If Oreo is close to either me or my husband, and she comes walking by (not at all provoking Oreo), Oreo will growl then show teeth. Two suggestions have been made - either find her a new home or have her put down. She also has dog aggression. As well as more and more not willing to let people see or pet her. I work from home as a pet groomer, I need to fix this.

If you need more info let me know what you'd like to know.

What would you suggest?

Shanette

Answer:

The problems you are seeing are the result of the way you live with your dog.  When dogs act like this they lack leadership from their owners. In other words their owners don’t understand how important pack drive is in how they raise their dogs. As your daughter gets older, your dog is trying to make sure he keeps his place in the pack order by making sure your daughter doesn’t become higher ranking than he is.  It’s up to you to be the leader, you have been allowing your dog to call the shots without even knowing that you are doing so. This is completely normal behavior in dogs and how they interact with each other. This is also very dangerous behavior especially when children are involved.

Owners of dogs like yours underestimate the genetic power of  "PACK DRIVE." Pack structure is not something new and it is not optional, and if you don’t provide the structure and leadership a dog NEEDS then he or she will behave as canines have for thousands of years and will structure your family and household their own way. Your dog is not behaving badly out of spite or stubbornness; your dog is simply being a dog, a dog that needs some guidance and rules.

If you want to fix a problem like this you can but it takes some work. 

I’d start with our Groundwork program  and the video that picks up where the article leaves off, Pack Structure for the Family Pet.

Here is a DVD that I would recommend titled Dealing with Dominant and Aggressive Dogs. If you go to the link on this DVD you can read about what it covers. You will also see a detailed outline of what’s in the video.

I’d use a muzzle and this dog would be either on a leash, muzzled attached to me or in a crate at all times until this issue is under control.  Oreo should not ever be loose in your house at all, she’s lost those privileges by behaving in a dominant manner.

I would direct you to the search function in the upper left corner of the website for any additional questions you may have. If you type in your key words it will guide you to articles, Q & A’s and posts on our forum.  You will find out that your problem is probably the most common issue discussed on our website. 

I hope this helps.

Cindy


6. Question:

Hi there,

We have a 16 month old Boerboel (South African Mastiff). We have been following your videos for puppies and he sailed through a local obedience class with flying colors.

We are having a baby in September and countless people have expressed concern over introducing the dog to the baby and visa versa. I scanned your Q&A, but couldn't find something close on the subject.

Is there a right vs. wrong way to introduce a dog to a new high ranking member of the pack?

When friends come over with toddlers, he is fantastic, but a crying newborn may be different.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

-Marisa (with her 165 pound Boerboel puppy)

Answer:

I’d make sure you have very good pack structure in place before bringing a baby home.  I’d start with our Groundwork program and the video that picks up where the article leaves off.  Pack Structure for the Family Pet

I would then recommend you spend some time reading our Dogs & Kids section, there is an article about how to introduce a baby into the household.

I hope this helps.

Cindy


7. Question:

Hello, I have looked for an answer to this question on your website and I have found some good responses but not one that totally satisfied me. So I wanted to ask you this one directly because I am concerned about this new puppy I have and need to make a decision about returning it to the breeder or not.

First off this puppy has a lot of qualities that we like she has bonded to the family almost instantly, she is very intelligent, very loving and is responding to basic obedience commands very well. My only concern is her growling at two young children and being very shy towards other dogs. She is a 16 week old Cane Corso which we have had for 5 days now. She has not growled at me or my 6 month old son at all but once at my wife when she was picking up a blanket that was in front of the puppy.

Both of the growls at the young children were due to the children getting close to the puppy. I do not and will not leave my dogs around kids unsupervised and this puppy is no exception. That said I know that the children were acting appropriately around the puppy under my supervision.

My question is if I should be as concerned as I am about this situation. I am trying to socialize the puppy by bringing her to new places and meeting new people every day. When we got her from the breeder I did notice that the pups mother was very unsociable however the father was fine. Also we picked her up from the breeder that lived on a farm and I am told the puppy received socialization off the farm.

I am currently in a situation were the breeder will take her back with a full refund early next week. However like I said before I really like this dog however if I cannot socialize her properly around other dogs or people this is a deal breaker. One other thing is due to school I had to leave me Boxer with my parents. I will not be able to pick up my Boxer for another 3 months and I am worried that I will have problems then not with my boxer but with this new puppy. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

Jared

Answer:

What kind of foundation did you establish for the puppy? Did you start her off with any pack structure when you brought her home? Sometimes new pups feel insecure until they settle in. This is where this article called The Groundwork to Becoming Your Puppy’s Pack Leader comes in.

Pack Structure for the Family Pet

There are also puppies that are genetically weak nerved or sharp. These dogs ABSOLUTELY need structure and to have all their free time controlled. They also need the work I mention above, but in many cases if you slack off on the structure at all as they grow you may have problems.

Many times weak nerved pups seem to bond instantly, because they are so unsure they need to be with an authority figure. These dogs can be good companions as long as you are aware of the dangers of having a dog whose genetic predisposition is to be suspicious.  Suspicious dogs typically don’t have the strongest self confidence and may have aggressive tendencies.

It all depends on what you can handle, what your household is like and whether the pup is just going through an adjustment period or if she’s showing a core temperament issue. You have a small child that will be mobile soon, so I would give careful thought to how your household will be changing as your son grows.

We have a section on dogs & babies.

If you do keep her I’d recommend you read this before you bring the boxer home.

I would direct you to the search function in the upper left corner of the website for any additional questions you may have. If you type in your key words it will guide you to articles, Q & A’s and posts on our forum. 

Cindy


8. Question:

Cindy,

Our 8 year old Chesapeake Bay Retriever bit our 1 1/2 yr old baby on her hand. My wife went into the kitchen quickly leaving them alone, less than 5 seconds, so she didn't see what happened. The dog drew blood - could have used a stitch or 2. My wife wants the dog to go, I don't know what to do. Sarge {our dog} has had possessive issues since he has been a pup. Thanks  for any thoughts that can protect all involved.

Tom

Answer:

If you’ve let a dog be possessive his whole life and then left him alone with a baby (even for a few seconds) you are very lucky there wasn’t a much worse incident.  

The problems you are seeing are the result of the way you live with your dog. When dogs act like this they lack leadership from their owners. In other words their owners don’t understand how important pack drive is in how they raise their dogs. 

Owners of dogs like yours underestimate the genetic power of  "PACK DRIVE." Pack structure is not something new and it is not optional, and if you don’t provide the structure and leadership a dog NEEDS then he or she will behave as canines have for thousands of years and will structure your family and household their own way. Your dog is not behaving badly out of spite or stubbornness; your dog is simply being a dog, a dog that needs some guidance and rules.

If you want to fix a problem like this it will take some work. I’d start with our Groundwork program and the video that picks up where the article leaves off - Pack Structure for the Family Pet.

Here is a DVD that I would recommend titled Dealing with Dominant and Aggressive Dogs. If you go to the link on this DVD you can read about what it covers. You will also see a detailed outline of what’s in the video.

This dog needs to have his free time controlled 100% of the time, no privileges unless you grant them and no contact with kids. 

We have a section on kids and dogs.

It’s likely that you will never be able to trust your dog around your child, if this was my child I would NEVER leave the dog with the baby ever. This dog would be on a leash attached to me, or in a crate or kennel at all times.

I would direct you to the search function in the upper left corner of the website for any additional questions you may have. If you type in your key words it will guide you to articles, Q & A’s and posts on our forum.

Cindy


9. Question:

Hi Cindy,
 
We have a two year old German Shepherd/Australian Cattle dog that we got from a shelter at three months old. We used both your Puppy and Basic training videos and our dog generally behaves well and we are happy with her. She is a soft dog and shows signs of being submissive as I understand it (presents her back side, licks me, etc.) She has never been aggressive towards anyone save for when we used to get near her and her food although that behavior has almost disappeared. We have a three month old girl and the dogs have been fantastic around her as well.

The problem is when toddlers are introduced to the mix. My 1 1/2 year old niece and a three year old friend of ours seem to make our dog uncomfortable. She gets snappy and barks around them, especially when they make sudden moves even if the actions are not directed at the dog. While we are confident that she will deal well with our daughter as she gets older, what can we do to help her deal with toddlers now? For now, we simply keep the dog and toddlers separated when they visit. We try to introduce the toddlers to the dog gently by having the kids pet her with me holding the dog or with the toddlers giving her treats so that she can experience toddlers in a pleasant setting. What would your best solution? I have looked over your boards and couldn't find a question that dealt specifically with this. Thanks.
 
Luke

Answer:

The recipe for a successful relationship between kids (of any age) and dogs is supervision at ALL times.  I’d first suggest you start with our Groundwork program and the video that picks up where the article leaves off - Pack Structure for the Family Pet DVD.

I would NOT ever think I was going to change a dog’s view of kids (no matter the age) by letting kids give the dog treats or petting. BAD IDEA. You are putting the dog and the child in precarious situation when you do this. It’s much better to teach the dog that they are not allowed to interact with the kids, and they must be indifferent and non aggressive. You must control the kids so they are not allowed to get in the dog’s space. It only takes a split second for an incident to happen.

If you find you need to put the dog in a crate in order to preserve the dog’s and child’s safety and your piece of mind then that’s what I would recommend. Be aware that as your baby’s mobility changes, your dog’s attitude towards her may also change. Don’t take anything for granted here.

You should read this section of the web site.

Cindy


10. Question:

Hello,

I have a 70-75 pound Alaskan Malamute that is 2 years old and have 2 cats that lived in the house prior to my dog living here. Ever since she (my dog) was a puppy, I followed your techniques with training her to get along with the cats. At this time, she is wonderful with the cats! She seems to even be protective over them and does NOT chase them, in fact she will quickly look the other way if she accidentally catches a glance of my 15 year old cat (my 15 year old cat is the boss of all the animals). There has been no fighting and truly peace between the cats and dog; the cats fight with each other, but never with the dog. 

I still keep the dog separated from the cats when my husband and I are not around (we use a tall baby gate with a lockable cat door in it). My question, is there ever a time in our dog's life where we can leave them in the same common area? I know that every dog/cat situation is different, but I am being super cautious and other than at night they do not wonder together without our supervision. She is trained to stay in our kitchen and only leaves the kitchen when we give her the command, so at night the cats sleep with us and the dog sleeps in the kitchen (I'm amazed that we were actually able to train her to stay in the kitchen, as she's my first dog). She'll even be within feet of the cats when they eat and does NOT go near their food. If anything, I actually have the opposite problem where my one cat will eat my dog's food and my dog will openly share with him with no ill feelings! However, I quickly scold the cat for doing that and remove him from the dog's food area as this is a bad habit that my cat has.

Thank you for all of the advice and training techniques with the cats, it really worked!  Overall, our dog is very easy going and really accepts our cats as part of her pack. I was very strict with my training, so I believe that things paid off!  Now, if I can only get my dog to protect me! It just does not seem to be in our dog's nature to want to do anything other than lick strangers!

Also, we are expecting our first child in a couple of weeks and was wondering if you have any DVD's or places within your website with advice for a new baby? She loves babies and kids, but I wanted to work with her in the correct manner. Perhaps I was looking in the wrong place or missed it on the website, but I couldn't find a DVD with baby specific baby information in it.

Regards,
Terri

Answer:

I can’t tell you if and when your dog is trustworthy around cats.  That is something that you will need to determine.  It sounds like you’ve done a good job training your dog, but without seeing your dog and cats interact with my own eyes, I would not want to offer an opinion about that.  

If you are having success with things as they are so I would not rock the boat especially with a baby coming.  Dogs need predictable structure; I wouldn’t be loosening things up at this point.  You’ve heard the saying “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

If you want a protection dog, I think you may have the wrong breed.  Malamutes were not bred to be protective, they were bred to be rather independent and to pull.

We have a section on our website about dogs and babies; use the search function (located in the left hand corner of every page on our website) Simply type in your search terms or key words and you will be directed to articles, question & answers, free streaming videos and posts on our forum.

I hope this helps.  

Cindy


11. Question:

Good morning!  I'm hoping you can give me some advice please.  I just came across your web page,5 months too late however! You offer great advice, and I hope to gain more.

We have an 11year old Jack Russell female and a 5 year old unaltered male Scottish Terrier. The Jack is the boss, and they were spoiled as our "kids" up until 5 months ago, when we had our son. We've done everything wrong according to your points on introducing dogs to babies. The dogs have full run of the house, including baby's room and our bedroom.

As our baby is beginning to move, I'm afraid of our dogs acting aggressive towards him. The Jack has licked the baby, but I fear once the babe gets crawling, she'll get nippy with him once he interrupts her sleeping. The Scottie follows me everywhere, and when i'm on the floor with baby, he's right there too. Yesterday, the baby moved his feet ever so slightly and touched the scottie-he let out a growl. The scottie sits beside the baby most times, is he protecting him or dominating him?

As we've spoiled these dogs for so long, will it make them worse if I crate them? If I do crate them, where should they be?  In view of the family, or somewhere remote?

I should add that the scottie has marked the baby's play things, he does on everything! Now I'm wondering if that is dominance?  As he has always been 2nd to the Jack, is he trying to lead the baby???

I appreciate your time in reading this and any help you can give would be wonderful. Thank you!!!!

Jean

Answer:

You need to take back leadership of your home, and crating the dogs is the first step. I'd start with our groundwork program.

If I had a dog that marked ANYWHERE in my house, but especially on my child's belongings I would take that as a serious red flag. Your dog is claiming the baby's items as his own, and most likely is sitting by the baby (not to protect him) but to also claim him as a resource, like he would a bone. This can be a dangerous situation.

I'd recommend you totally restructure the dogs' lives, as the baby becomes more mobile this will become much more complicated to deal with. You need to have control of the dogs. 

I'd also recommend Dealing with Dominant & Aggressive Dogs.  

You may want to review our kids and dogs section as well. I would recommend learning to use our SEARCH function, which is located in the top left corner of every page of the website. If you type in your key words or question it will find you articles, Q & A’s, free streaming video and links to threads on our discussion forum. 

Cindy

Thank You:

Thank you sooo much for getting back to me!! Your advice and web page are indispensable!! Thanks again for your time!!!

Jean


12. Question:

Hello Ed,

I’ve always been a big fan of you and your website, and I do get your newsletters… thank you!

Quick question:

I thought I was done with parenting after my first daughter turned 16 and the other 12 so I got a beautiful German Shepherd with 100% german lines out of a Texas breeder. He is a wonderful, obedient, sweet dog with what I would presume a great temperament. 

No issues with aggressiveness at all;  He is a bit of a baby who enjoys to play and be with my kids and I. Sometimes I wonder if he will ever attack if someone breaks into my house….

As life would have it, my wife and I recently had a wonderful unexpected surprise… a baby boy. Our dog has not shown any aggression to the baby at all, and because I don’t allow him to get close to the baby he doesn’t show any interest in the baby either. 

I have introduced him to the baby several times for a very short period of time with me off course and he dog just licks his little feet and lies down on my feet. 

In your experience, when do you know things are going to be alright and he will see this new baby like he sees our 12 year old? 

Andrés

Answer:

You should read the section on preventing dog bites with kids, there is a section on how to properly introduce a baby to a dog.

There is no magic time frame, because every dog is different.  Some dogs can never be trusted with babies or kids, and honestly who really wants to test it?  To a dog, a baby is not even the same type of creature as a 12 year old kid.

I always supervise my dogs and kids, that way the risk of something happening is minimal.

Cindy Rhodes


13. Question:

Hello my name is Angie, I was searching around online and found your site and had a similar situation. I have a 9 month old rott and when she was a puppy, about 3 months, she bit my daughter while eating a bone. My daughter had dropped something by her reached down to get it and she bit her lip. Since then, my other daughter claims she bit her head while she brushing her hair next to her and just tonight my other daughter, 5, was trying to hug the puppy and she said at first she bit her but then said she just scratched her face. Now looking at her it didn't seem like a bit but I'm not sure. What can I do to make sure this isn't really happening over and over again. Are me and my family over reacting and is she really just being a playful puppy or do I have a real problem? Anything you can suggest that might be helpful I will greatly appreciate it.

Answer:

It sounds like you have a problem brewing. Kids and dogs should always be supervised as neither of them are known for their good decision making skills.

Here is  a section on preventing dog bites in kids.

Your puppy needs training and leadership. Rottweilers are big, powerful dogs that can do a lot of damage. I’d recommend Pack Structure for the Family Pet and Basic Dog Obedience.

We also have a number of ebooks, which include topics that may help you. 

I hope this helps. Please don’t allow your kids and dog to be unsupervised.

Cindy Rhodes


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